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Researching Up: Triangulating Qualitative Research To Influence the Public Debate of “On-Time” College Graduation


by Tim McCormack, Emily Schnee & Jason VanOra — 2014


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 116 Number 4, 2014, p. -
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 17413, Date Accessed: 12/14/2017 9:58:06 AM
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About the Author
  • Tim McCormack
    John Jay College of Criminal Justice
    E-mail Author
    TIM MCCORMACK is an assistant professor of English at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY who teaches basic writing, first-year composition, journalism, and creative non-fiction to undergraduates, as well as graduate courses in the teaching of writing and writing for management. His most recent publication, “Boss of Me: When the Former Adjunct Runs the Writing Shop,” appeared in the Fall 2011 issue of WPA: Journal of the Council of Writing Program Administrators. McCormack is currently working on an ethnographic research project he calls a “literacyscape,” which will detail the pedagogical and curricular dividing line between freshman composition and basic writing classrooms and how that line impacts students’ academic achievement and progress.
  • Emily Schnee
    Kingsborough Community College
    E-mail Author
    EMILY SCHNEE is Assistant Professor of English at Kingsborough Community College, CUNY where she teaches developmental English and composition. Her research interests are urban education, educational equity, and social justice. She is currently conducting a study, with Jason VanOra, on the long-term impact of learning communities on academically underprepared community college students. Schnee’s essay “Upward Mobility and Higher Education: Mining the Contradictions in a Worker Education Program” was selected for inclusion in the forthcoming collection Class and the College Classroom, edited by Robert C. Rosen (Continuum Press). She is the co-author with VanOra of “Student Incivility: An Engagement or Compliance Model?” published in MountainRise: The International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (Winter 2012).
  • Jason VanOra
    Kingsborough Community College
    E-mail Author
    JASON VANORA is a social/personality psychologist and Assistant Professor of Psychology at Kingsborough Community College. His interests concern the impact of marginalization on personality, resiliency, and identity. Recent publications include “Student Incivility: An Engagement or Compliance Model?” (co-authored with Emily Schnee) published in MountainRise: The International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and “The Experience of Community College for Developmental Students: Challenges and Motivations” published in Community College Enterprise. His forthcoming book, being published by AMS Press is entitled “Desperate to Achieve: Understanding the Lives, Struggles, and Motivations of Community College Students Assigned to Developmental Classes.”
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