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Race and Academic Achievement in Racially Diverse High Schools: Opportunity and Stratification


by Chandra Muller, Catherine Riegle-Crumb, Kathryn S. Schiller, Lindsey Wilkinson & Kenneth A. Frank — 2010


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 112 Number 4, 2010, p. 1038-1063
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 15659, Date Accessed: 8/29/2014 4:00:22 AM
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About the Author
  • Chandra Muller
    University of Texas at Austin
    E-mail Author
    CHANDRA MULLER is a professor of sociology and a faculty affiliate of the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research interests are in the effects of high schools on adolescents’ transitions to adulthood. She is principal investigator of the Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement Study. Her recent publications (with colleagues Frank, Riegle-Crumb, Schiller, Wilkinson, and others) concern the effects of social relationships on math and science course-taking in Sociology of Education and American Journal of Sociology, and the course-taking patterns of immigrant students (with Rebecca Callahan and others) in Social Science Quarterly and Theory and Research in Social Education.
  • Catherine Riegle-Crumb
    University of Texas at Austin
    CATHERINE RIEGLE-CRUMB is an assistant professor of curriculum and instruction and a faculty research associate at the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research interests include how social contexts influence gender and racial/ethnic inequality in educational trajectories from high school into postsecondary, with a particular focus on the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Recent publications include “The Role of Gender and Friendship in Advanced Course-Taking” (with coauthors George Farkas and Chandra Muller) in Sociology of Education.
  • Kathryn Schiller
    University at Albany, State University of New York
    KATHRYN S. SCHILLER is an associate professor in the Department of Educational Administration and Policy Studies and the Department of Sociology at the University at Albany, State University of New York. Her main fields of interest are social stratification, math and science curriculum, academic trajectories, and school transitions. Recent publications include “Raising the Bar and Equity? State Policies and High School Students’ Mathematics Course Taking” in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, and “Economic Development and the Effects of Family Characteristics on Mathematics Achievement” in the Journal of Marriage and Family.
  • Lindsey Wilkinson
    Portland State University
    LINDSEY WILKINSON is an assistant professor of sociology at Portland State University. Her research interests include educational inequality, immigrant adaptation, and the transition to adulthood. She has recently coauthored articles in Educational Policy and Social Science Quarterly that address the impact of high school ESL placement on math and science course-taking among immigrant youth. She is currently working on a project that examines the impact of high school processes on the language use of Asians and Latinos in young adulthood.
  • Kenneth Frank
    Michigan State University
    KENNETH A. FRANK is a professor of measurement and quantitative methods, counseling, educational psychology, and special education, and an associate professor of fisheries and wildlife at Michigan State University. His substantive interests include the diffusion of innovations, study of schools as organizations, social structures of students and teachers and school decision-making, social capital, and resource flow. His substantive areas are linked to several methodological interests: social network analysis, causal inference, and multilevel models. Recent publications, with collaborators, include “The Social Dynamics of Mathematics Coursetaking in High School” in American Journal of Sociology, and “Extended Influence: National Board Certified Teachers as Help Providers” in Education, Evaluation, and Policy Analysis.
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