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Articles
by Brady Jones — 2018
This article explores the role of personality in teacher retention using a rich set of quantitative and qualitative measures. The author finds that despite stereotypes of American teachers as unambitious, a “special kind of ambition”—self-promotion coupled with a commitment to others—predicts a long-term commitment to the occupation.

by Kristy Stein, Andrew Miness & Tara Kintz — 2018
The authors use cognitive flexibility theory to theoretically and empirically explore the relationship between how high school teachers understand student engagement and their ability to consistently engage students in class. Using three years of data from annual student surveys and teacher focus groups, they find that teachers whom students rated as being more engaging tended to illustrate more cognitive flexibility in how they spoke and thought about engagement.

by Holland Banse, Timothy Curby, Natalia Palacios & Sara Rimm-Kaufman — 2018
This study examines relations between fifth-grade teachers’ use of general teaching practices, such as emotional support, and mathematics-specific practices, such facilitating mathematical discourse, over the course of a school year.

by Alice Ginsberg, Marybeth Gasman & Andrés Samayoa — 2017
This article explores the contributions of minority serving institutions to the production of teachers of color. The authors lay the groundwork for research in this area and put forth an agenda for future research.

by Irene Yoon — 2016
This article analyzes the way that a teacher community shares stories about students in a racially and socioeconomically diverse elementary school. The narratives that emerge from the teacher community’s discourse reveal these middle-class White women teachers’ intense ambiguity about, and social distance from, their students. Implications for leadership and policy in response to this common occurrence in schools are discussed.

by Eleanor Fulbeck & Meredith Richards — 2015
In this study, authors use data from 2006 to 2010 to examine the impact of school-based financial incentives on patterns of teacher mobility, focusing on teachers' strategic moves.

by Nicole Simon & Susan Moore Johnson — 2015
This article reframes the debate about what fuels high rates of teacher turnover in high-poverty schools. After reviewing findings from past studies of turnover, it focuses on recent scholarship suggesting that teachers who leave such schools are not fleeing their students, but rather the poor working conditions that make it difficult for them to teach and for their students to learn.

by Toni Rogat, Shelly Witham & Clark Chinn — 2014
Our purpose is to enrich current conceptualizations of autonomy support that remain constrained by the context of study and by the limited available descriptions of teacher enactment. Toward this end, we richly describe teachers’ provision of academically significant autonomy support within an inquiry-based science curricular context to incorporate higher quality differentiations.

by Erika Kitzmiller — 2013
This article presents and analyzes a variety of approaches that teachers in a struggling urban school used after a violent teacher attack ushered in a culture of chaos and fear throughout the school. As this paper suggests, many of these approaches failed to generate the authority necessary to restore student engagement and the relational trust between teachers and students that they had lost following this incident. At the same time, one teacher implemented an approach that allowed him to reclaim his authority, repair the teacher-student relationship, and increase student engagement in his classroom. Drawing on various theories about power and authority in schools, I argue that the degree to which these different approaches created engaging learning environments and restored a meaningful teacher-student relationship depended on whether students recognized a teacher’s authority as legitimate.

by Andrew Brantlinger & Beverly Smith — 2013
Alternative teacher certification programs have surfaced as a popular remedy to alleviate anxieties about the quality of teachers in hard-to-staff schools and in such high needs areas as mathematics. Despite the growth in the number and influence of alternative route programs their particulars remain largely unexamined. This study addresses this situation by investigating the preparation of mathematics teachers in the New York City Teaching Fellows (NYCTF) program, an alternative route program of national prominence.

by Eran Tamir — 2013
This comparative, longitudinal study of 30 beginning teachers from three mission-driven, teacher education programs explores career commitments among beginning teachers and how school environments shape them. The study confirms the importance of administration support and professional community even for elite college graduates who are highly motivated to teach and make a difference in the lives of children.

by Barbara Stengel & Mary Casey — 2013
To teach for instrumental and innovative growth for both student and teacher is not simply a technical challenge. It is a moral task, requiring intimacy in the service of developing autonomy. It involves moral sensitivity and moral perception in prompting and framing responsible pedagogical action. It is an emotionally fraught enterprise, one that runs headlong into the human resistance to development and growth (Bion, 1994). What follows is an uncovering of this pedagogical responsibility. As we shall show, the way in to the moral dimensions of a teacher’s work is the same path that leads to academic effectiveness. Taking the moral seriously is not a diversion from the preparation and development of effective teachers, nor is it an added consideration; it is central to the very possibility of responsive and responsible education.

by Jim Garrison & A.G. Rud — 2013
The purpose of this chapter is to understand the spiritual dimensions of teaching by elucidating the cardinal and forgotten virtue of reverence. Reverence has a power beyond a typical understanding of it as something religious. Reverence involves a sense of wonder and awe for something or someone that meets at least one of the following conditions: (1) something we cannot control; (2) something we cannot create; (3) something we cannot fully understand; (4) something transcendent, even supernatural The chapter shows reverence in a wider context that does not diminish its spiritual connotations, but rather shows its importance and relevance to teaching in today’s classrooms.

by Eleanor Drago-Severson — 2012
This research identifies strategies that principals in high-, middle- and low-financial resource Catholic, independent, and public schools use to foster school climates that promote teacher learning and development.

by Pamela Grossman — 2011
In this introduction to a special section on teaching practice, Pam Grossman introduces the ideas from the original study on teaching practice that inspired the work in teacher education described in the articles that follow. She describes the constructs of the representation, decomposition, and approximation of practice and how these help us understand more deeply how professional practice is taught.

by Morgaen Donaldson, Susan Moore Johnson, Cheryl Kirkpatrick, William Marinell, Jennifer Steele & Stacy Szczesiul — 2008
Drawing on interviews with 20 second-stage teachers (in their 3rd �10th year), this study examines the experiences of teachers who were relatively new to the teaching profession yet occupied positions that set them apart from their colleagues. We found that these teachers encountered resistance from their colleagues who invoked teaching�s traditional norms of autonomy, egalitarianism, and seniority in rebuffing the second-stage teachers� efforts to change their classroom practice.

by Marnie Curry — 2008
This article examines school-based professional inquiry communities known as Critical Friends Groups, analyzing how four design features—their diverse menu of activities, their decentralized structure, their interdisciplinary membership, and their reliance on structured conversation tools called “protocols”—influence the capacity of these groups to pursue whole-school reform and instructional improvement.

by Adrienne Dixson & Jeannine Dingus — 2008
This article examines reasons underlying the professional entry of African American women teachers who participated in two separate qualitative studies. Study findings suggest that for some Black women teachers, teaching is more than a vocational choice, but rather a decision related to intergenerational connections, communities, and cultural work.

by Judith Little — 2007
Accounts of teaching experience punctuate teachers’ talk with one another in a range of workplace contexts: in staffroom or hallway encounters, regularly scheduled meetings of one sort or another, professional development events, and increasingly, activities focused on reviews of school assessment data or samples of student work. Such accounts, whether in the form of passing references or extended narratives, form a pervasive feature of professional interaction. Yet in studies that now span several decades, scholars offer quite mixed assessments of them: what they convey of teachers’ knowledge; what they signify regarding teachers’ beliefs about and dispositions toward students, parents, and colleagues; how they function in shaping or changing the norms of professional discourse; and what they offer as resources for problem solving and innovation.

by Allan Luke — 2004
A critique of current educational policies effects on teaching and teacher education, focusing on the redefinition of teaching in new economic and cultural conditions.

by Lesley Rex & Matthew Nelson — 2004
In this article, we present profiles of two high school English teachers and their classrooms as the teachers responded to mandated high-stakes test accountability.

by Jane Agee — 2004
This case study examines the experiences of a young African American English teacher over 3 years as she tried to teach multicultural literature.

by Richard Ingersoll — 2004
Although ensuring that our nation’s classrooms are all staffed with quality teachers is a perennially important issue in our schools, it is also among the most misunderstood. This misunderstanding centers on the supposed sources of the problem—the reasons behind the purportedly low quality of teaching in American schools—and has undermined the success of reform efforts. Underlying much of the criticism and reforms is a series of assumptions and claims as to the sources of the problems plaguing the teaching occupation. In this chapter I will focus on four of these.

by Ana María Villegas & Tamara Lucas — 2004
In this chapter, we argue that increasing the racial/ethnic diversity of the teacher workforce should be a key component of any system that aims to supply schools with well-prepared teachers for all students. We first explain why we think attention and resources should be devoted to increasing the diversity of the teacher workforce. We then provide a brief account of minority teacher and student representation in U.S. public schools since 1950, followed by a discussion of the reasons why the percentage of minorities in the teacher workforce declined significantly during the 1970s and 1980s.

by Carolyn Kelley & Kara Finnigan — 2004
In this chapter, we focus on the role that one policy area—teacher compensation—can play in inhibiting or advancing teacher quality through its impact on attracting, retaining, and developing a high-quality teaching force. Because compensation reform is at a nascent stage of development, we rely on a variety of information sources for our review, including empirical research studies examining the role that compensation plays in influencing teacher behaviors, theoretical studies, and case studies of innovative uses of compensation to affect teacher behavior.

by Nina Bascia — 2004
This chapter draws attention to two of the major and unique contributions teacher unions have made to the quality of the teacher workforce over the past several decades. It draws from more than a decade of research on U.S. and Canadian teacher unions’ roles in both the backwaters and the frontiers of educational reform.

by Mary Futrell & Janet Heddesheimer — 2004
Over the past two decades in the United States, there has been an increased emphasis on ensuring an adequate supply of teachers to serve our diverse student population. In response to this need, a movement to redefine teaching as a profession in order to attract and retain more teachers has emerged. At the same time, a countermovement has emerged, advocating that anyone who can meet minimal content and pedagogical standards should be allowed to teach. Both approaches use the phrase “highly qualified” to describe their teacher candidates.

by Paul Goren — 2004
If you visit the human resource operations of most districts, you will see that they are focused primarily on triage—handling the most immediate problem facing the school system that day. These problems can range from not having enough substitutes to meeting the No Child Left Behind mandates to finding mid-year replacements for specialists or for particular courses. As important as it is to have a full, well thought out, rational strategy for teacher recruitment and retention, it is hard to sustain this effort alone, when day-today emergencies must take precedence.

by Daniel Liston — 2004
Teaching entails a love of learning. In teaching, teachers invite students to learn more about the grace of great things.

by Lisa Smulyan — 2004
This study uses data from a 10-year longitudinal study to explore how women graduates of a liberal arts college experience the gendered construction of teachers and teaching as they make life and career choices.

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Resources
  • Teacher Quality
    Overall, the chapters in this edited volume provide the reader with a portrait of a good teacher and good teaching methods and encourage districts to set high standards for teachers, to develop strong accountability systems for measuring performance, to reward those who perform and frown on those who do not.
  • Innovations in Education and Teaching International
    The content of IETI includes a range of perspectives, and important contributions on new developments in educational technology.
  • Center for the Study of Teaching and Policy
    CTP is one of 12 national research centers funded by the Department of Education. It functions as a consortium, drawing together researchers from five universities—Teachers College/Columbia, Stanford University, the University of Michigan, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Washington (lead institution). CTP tracks the enactment and effects of policies aimed at the improvement of teaching in various contexts and at multiple levels of the system, identifying ways these policies support, stimulate, impede, or otherwise affect the quality of teaching and learning in U.S. elementary and secondary schools.
  • Improving Teacher Evaluation to Improve Teaching Quality
    Reforming teacher evaluation holds promise as a strategy to improve instruction and raise student achievement.
  • Oxford Review of Education
    The object of the Oxford Review of Education is to advance the study of education. It especially wishes to promote the elaboration and evaluation of a body of speculative and empirical theory, the development of which might improve educational practice.
  • The Consortium for Policy Research in Education
    The Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE) unites researchers from five of the nation's leading universities to improve elementary and secondary education through research on policy, finance, school reform, and school governance.
  • Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality
    Examines the appropriateness and technical quality of teacher licensure tests currently in use, evaluates the merits of using licensure test results to hold states and institutions of higher education accountable for the quality of teacher preparation and licensure, and suggests alternatives for developing and assessing beginning teacher competence.
  • Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education
    The Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education is an international medium for educators with an interest in the pre-service and continuing education of teachers.
  • The National Center for Restructuring Education, Schools, and Teaching
    NCREST, established at Teachers College in 1990, supports restructuring efforts by documenting successful initiatives, creating reform networks to share new research findings with practitioners, and linking policy to practice.
  • Teacher Test Accountability: From Alabama to Massachusetts
    The purpose of this article is to highlight some of the psychometric results reported by National Evaluation Systems (NES) in their 1999 Massachusetts Educator Certification Test (MECT) Technical Report, and more specifically, to identify those technical characteristics of the MECT that are inconsistent with the Standards. A second purpose of this article is to call for the establishment of a standing test auditing organization with investigation and sanctioning power.
  • Phi Delta Kappan
    The Phi Delta Kappan publishes articles concerned with educational research, service, and leadership; issues, trends, and policy are emphasized.
  • National Education Association
    NEA is America's oldest and largest organization committed to advancing the cause of public education.
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