Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements
Early Childhood Education


Articles
by Ümmühan Yeşil Dağlı & Ithel Jones — 2013
This study utilized data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 to examine the longitudinal effects of delayed, early or on-time kindergarten enrollment and relative age on children’s reading and mathematics achievement from kindergarten to third grade. Data were analyzed using a propensity score stratification method and a cross-classified random effects model, adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics. Children in the delayed group entered kindergarten with higher reading and mathematics scores, yet achievement differences were negligible by the end of third grade. Relative age predicted children’s performances in reading and mathematics achievement. Typically, children who were older than their peers in the same class had higher academic achievement scores.

by Gregory Camilli, Sadako Vargas, Sharon Ryan & W. Steven Barnett — 2010
There is much current interest in the impact of early childhood education programs on preschoolers and, in particular, on the magnitude of cognitive and affective gains. To address this issue comprehensively, a meta-analysis was conducted for the purpose of synthesizing the outcomes of comparative studies in this area. Consistent with the accrued research base on the effects of preschool education, significant effects were found in this study for children who attend a preschool program prior to entering kindergarten. Although the largest effect sizes were observed for cognitive outcomes, a preschool education was also found to impact children�s social skills and school progress. Specific aspects of the treatments that positively correlated with gains included teacher-directed instruction and small-group instruction; provision of additional services tended to be associated with smaller gains.

by Daric Desautel — 2009
This article explores how several classroom practices can promote self-reflection and metacognition among elementary students. When built into the existing curriculum, activities such as directed goal-setting, practice with language prompts, written self-reflections, and posttask oral conversations are shown to enrich the learning process by increasing students' awareness of themselves as learners.

by Wendy McGrath — 2007
This article discusses the notion of parent-teacher partnerships in early childhood education and care, and presents findings from an ethnographic study of relationships between mothers and teachers in a child care center.

by Judith Bernhard, Jim Cummins, F. Campoy, Alma Ada, Adam Winsler & Charles Bleiker — 2006
The authors describe in this article an innovative language intervention program involving the creation of bilingual, student self-authored identity texts. Called the Early Authors Program (EAP), the intervention stands as an example of how spaces and opportunities for literacy development among young ELLs can be created in a classroom instructional environment.

by William Jeynes — 2006
The author argues that American educators rely on standardized tests at too early an age when administered in kindergarten, particularly given the original intent of kindergarten as envisioned by its founder, Friedrich Froebel.

by David Kennedy — 2000
An inquiry into Western representations of childhood in art, literature, social and cultural history, philosophy, psychoanalysis and religion. Implications are considered for the future of the adult-child relation in child rearing and education.

by Bruce Fuller, Costanza Eggers-Pierola, Susan Holloway & Xiaoyan Liang — 1996
This article focuses on the considerably lower proportion of Latino parents who select a formal preschool or child-care center for their three to five-year-old youngsters. The authors empirically focus on the influence of ethnicity, maternal education, family structure, and preliteracy practices on parents' propensity to select preschools and center-based programs.

by Grace Hechinger & Fred Hechinger — 1990
Reports on a study of the way children are provided for in Scandinavia and explores those aspects of the child-care system which are potentially adaptable to American needs.

by Leslie Williams & Frances Rust — 1989
An introduction to this special issue of the Teachers College Record that represents some of the most recent thinking on the conceptual and practical growth within the field of early childhood education and child care.

by Bettye Caldwell — 1989
Child care and early childhood education should be fully integrated. The roots and consequences of the current separation are examined. A description is provided of the Kramer Project, a day care school. Obstacles to fully integrated day care and educational services are discussed.

by Rene Magid — 1989
After tracing the changing forms of work, family life, and child care in America, this article explores the benefits to family, home life, work place, parents, children, and child care workers afforded by a variety of current employer practices in child care services and support.

by Guy Haskins & Samuel Alessi, Jr. — 1989
Buffalo's Early Childhood Centers, which grew out of court-ordered desegregation plans, are described and evaluated in this article in terms of student achievement, parental involvement, and racial balancing.

by Frances Rust — 1989
The change process surrounding the introduction of an all-day kindergarten program in a small suburban school district is examined in this case study. Implications for adoption and implementation of early childhood programs in other school systems are discussed.

by Lisbeth Schorr — 1989
A look at programs that reduce damaging outcomes for at-risk youth.

by Marian Edelman — 1989
This article discusses the connection between the availability of day care and early childhood education and the future of the U.S. economy by examining three key elements in the relationship: the family, the individual, and the nation as a whole.

by Patrick Lee — 1989
Two antithetical views of the sense-making potential of young children are explored: the Piagetian egocentric view and the sociocentric view. The article suggests that empirical research demonstrates socially construed perspective-taking tasks do not show the young child to be egocentric, but sociocentric.

by Doris Fromberg — 1989
Kindergarten programs in public schools generally have an academic/ formal orientation or an intellectual/experiential orientation. This article highlights the fundamental differences between the two approaches by examining current curriculum, policy and staffing, and administrative practice regarding kindergarten.

by Leslie Williams — 1989
This article outlines key issues in early childhood education related to (1) identification and characterization of the populations to be served, (2) definition of the goals of services, (3) preparation of early childhood specialists, and (4) optimal settings for delivery of service.

by Sharon Kagan — 1989
This article discusses four reasons for advocacy activities related to early childhood education and child care: preserving existing programs; increasing capacity and quality of service; making early education more accessible, affordable, and equitable; and educating the public.

by Iona Ginsburg — 1982
The views of Jean Piaget and Rudolf Steiner concerning children's stages of development are compared and related to present-day instructional practices used in the Waldorf schools, which employ Steiner's ideas. Educational principles and practices used at the elementary school level are discussed.

by David Ertel & Gilbert Voyat — 1982
Jean Piaget's theories about children's cognitive development are applied to the evaluation of childhood psychosis. Problems with the testing of such children are described, and results of a research project that used the Piaget-inspired Uzgiris and Hunt Ordinal Scales of Psychological Development to assess autistic children's cognitive processes are given.

by Kieran Egan — 1982
Jean Piaget's belief that children's developmental levels largely determine what they can learn is challenged. Research concerning the existence of cognitive structures in children is critiqued, and problems with administering Piagetian tasks are pointed out. Educators should not restrict children's exposure to learning because, according to Piagetian criteria, they are not ready.

by John Broughton, Bonnie Leadbeater & Eric Amsel — 1981
On November 14, 1980, the Developmental Psychology Program at Teachers College, Columbia University, held a memorial conference in Thorndike Hall to mark the death of Jean Piaget on September 17, 1980. Sixteen scholars from the fields of psychology, philosophy, and education presented brief reflections on Piaget’s work to an audience of about sixty people.

by William Sweeney — 1975
The underlying premise of this article is that the information and the education processes should be perceived as integrated—or combined in a larger process—and that activities related to both processes should be coordinated. The perception is important in both the industrialized and less industrialized countries (LIC's).

by Urie Bronfenbrenner — 1974
The 1960s saw the widespread adoption in this country of early education pro¬grams aimed at counteracting the effects of poverty on human development. This article is an analysis of seven early education program studies.

by Lawrence Cremin — 1974
As fresh studies of familial education are undertaken in their own right—studies in which explicitly educational questions are addressed to appropriate primary sources—a criticized body of generalizations will begin to emerge, and we shall come to see the family anew as the crucially important educator it has always been.

by Hope Leichter — 1974
The author discusses some of the literature on the family as educator. The family is an arena in which virtually the entire range of human experience can take place. Warfare, violence, love, tenderness, honesty, deceit, private property, communal sharing, power manipulation, informed consent, formal status hierar¬chies, egalitarian decision-making—all can be found within the setting of the fam¬ily. And so, also, can a variety of educational encounters, ranging from conscious, systematic instruction to repetitive, moment-to-moment influences at the margins of awareness.

by Margaret Mead — 1974
Within anthropology we have developed several useful distinctions in discussing the questions of how grandparents do or do not play a role in the education of children in any given society, and particularly in our own. Within the context of this article the author uses the word education to include conscious teaching of any sort, whether of speech, manners, morals, or skills, but include also the process of socialization, which occurs in all societies as children learn to restrain their impulses, postpone gratification, control their sphincters, walk, talk, and participate in social life, and the process of enculturation, by which children learn a particular culture.

by Peter Moock — 1974
It is possible to combine all the individual and group consumption that goes on in the family unit into one "family consumption package" and, using economic theories designed for analyzing individual decisions, to make valid and useful statements about family activities.

Found 43
Displaying 1 to 30
<Back | Next>
Recent Posts
 
Book Reviews
by Anna Beresin
reviwed by Shifra Teitelbaum — 2014

by Stacie G. Goffin
reviwed by Donna Satterlee — 2014

by James J. Heckman
reviwed by Nicola Alexander — 2013

by Eurydice B. Bauer & Mileidis Gort (eds.)
reviwed by Michael Byram — 2013

by Holly Elissa Bruno & Tom Copeland
reviwed by Megan Hallissey & Saran Donahoo — 2013

by Olivia N. Saracho & Bernard Spodek
reviwed by Stephanie Smith — 2013

by Doris Pronin Fromberg
reviwed by Malissa Wheeler — 2013

Found 101
Displaying 1 to 10
<Back | Next>

Resources
  • Maximizing Learning in Early Childhood Multiage Classrooms: Child, Teacher, and Parent Perceptions
    The multiage classroom is not a new concept. In fact, the concept of multiage grouping dates back to the one-room schoolhouse of the 19th century. Most educators believe that multiage grouping allows them to develop a more developmentally appropriate program. It is considered as a “natural community of learners”.
  • Early Years: An International Journal of Research and Development
    Early Years: An International Journal of Research and Development, aims to broaden the international debate about the best provision for young children by representing a wide range of perspectives from different countries, different disciplines and different research methodologies.
  • Reading Rockets
    Reading Rockets is a national multimedia project that looks at how young kids learn to read, why so many struggle, and how caring adults can help them.
  • Eager to Learn: Educating Our Preschoolers
    What will it take to provide better early education and care for our children between the ages of two and five?
  • Educational Psychology in Practice
    The defining feature of Educational Psychology in Practice is that it aims to publish refereed articles representing theory, research and practice which is of relevance to practising educational psychologists in the UK and beyond.
  • The Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center
    The Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center is one of the nation's oldest multidisciplinary centers for the study of young children and their families. Research and education activities focus on child development and health, especially factors that may put children at risk for developmental problems.
  • A Comparison of the National Preschool Curricula in Norway and Sweden
    A comparison of national preschool plans for children ages 1 to 5 in terms of their evolution, purpose, and content
  • Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood
    Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood is a new online, fully-refereed, free-access, international research journal.
  • The Society for Research in Child Development
    The purposes of the Society are to promote multidisciplinary research in the field of human development and to foster the exchange of information among scientists.
  • The Role of Religious Beliefs in Early Childhood Education: Christian and Buddhist Preschools in Japan
    The views of teachers and directors in four Christian preschools and four Buddhist preschools are examined in this qualitative study of early childhood education in Japan.
  • Child Development
    Since its inception in 1930, Child Development has been devoted to original contributions on topics in child development from the fetal period through adolescence. It is a vital source of information not only for researchers and theoreticians, but for child psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, psychiatric social workers, specialists in early childhood education, educational psychologists, special education teachers, and other researchers in the field.
  • Society for Research in Child Development
    SRCD is a multidisciplinary, not-for-profit, professional association with an international membership of approximately 5,000 researchers, practitioners, and human development professionals
Found 28Displaying 1 to 10 <Back | Next>
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS