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Articles
by Lewis Wasserman & John Connolly — 2017
This article examines the impact of the Supreme Court’s 2006 Garcetti v. Ceballos ruling on the voting of both Democratic and Republican U.S. Courts of Appeals appointees as a case of doctrinal signaling.

by Wayne Journell — 2016
This article analyzes the act of teacher political disclosure using both the democratic and interpersonal aspects of Foucault’s notion of parrhēsia.

by Kenneth Zeichner & César Peña-Sandoval — 2015
This article analyzes the role of venture philanthropy in shaping teacher education policies in the United States, with a particular focus on the role of the New Schools Venture Fund in promoting the Growing Excellent Achievement Training Academies for Teachers and Principals Act.

by Joel Weiss & Robert Brown — 2003
This paper challenges the traditional interpretation of the origins of the North American summer calendar by suggesting that the roots of the presently defined school year were more influenced by multiple pressures arising from increasing urbanization, than by the demands of farm life. Examining why there has been such resistance to changing the school calendar, the paper investigates the calendar’s ties with changes over time in the construction of other “clocks” of society. Finally, we consider the school calendar as part of a larger ongoing discussion on what constitutes effectiveness of schools.

by James Ryan — 2003
The paper argues that what currently counts as race discrimination in education and how such discrimination is proven are, from a legal perspective, at once both straightforward and complex questions.

by Frederick Hess, Robert Maranto, Scott Milliman & Kathleen Grammatico — 2002
While research on choice-based school reform has proliferated in recent years, little attention has been paid to examining how teachers themselves view choice-based reforms or what shapes their attitudes. We use a survey of teachers in Arizona, the state with the nation's most developed system of school choice, to explore how key personal and contextual traits influence teachers' attitudes toward charter schools and school vouchers. Our results can help shed light on how teachers will respond to the spread of school choice, and the likely prospects and effects of choice-based reform.

by Julie McDaniel & Cecil Miskel — 2002
The purpose of this study is to employ a stakeholder framework to examine the changing salience levels of a state business group as it tried to shape educational policy during a 5-year period of intense state-level reform.

by Henry Giroux — 2002
An examination of the many ways in which life in post–September 11 America is both a rupture from some of the antigovernment politics that dominated before these tragic events and an uncanny continuity from the pre–September 11 worship of global capitalism and the virtual abandonment of any effort to create greater equality.

by Roger Mourad — 2001
In this paper, the question of the relationship of education to conceptions of individual well-being within the broader context of political theory is pursued.

by Joseph Murphy — 2000
This essay reviews the current governance problems in education and details the range of possible governance models for post-industrial schooling.

by David Purpel — 1997
We would all be better served by recognizing that the current so-called character education movement essentially represents an ideological and political movement rather than a debate about curricular and instructional matters. My basic criticisms of this approach, which are elaborated in this chapter, can be briefly stated as deploring the naïveté or disingenuousness of the discourse and of the inadequacies of its political and social assumptions. I will try to show how this movement, far from being innovative and reforming, represents instead a longstanding tradition of using schools as agents of social stability., political stasis, and cultural preservation. I hope that this analysis will shed light on the more general issues of moral education and the moral nature of education.

by Richard Elmore & Susan Fuhrman — 1995
This article examines the evolution of deregulation as a state education policy strategy, from limited waiver programs to charter programs and new accountability systems that include broad deregulation. The article discusses the substantial political and practical barriers to broad deregulation despite the assumption that greater school-level autonomy will lead to improvement.

by Joshua Bogin — 1995
As a moderator of a “Brown Plus Forty” Conference general session panel discussion, the author offers both a synthesis of the panelists’ expressed views and his own thoughts on the legacy of the Supreme Court’s 1954 opinion.

by Kevin Brown — 1995
The Supreme Court's vision in Brown did not include a multicultural society

by Marshall Smith & Brett Scoll — 1995
President Clinton's human capital agenda emphasizes efforts to ensure the future strength of the United States economy by investing in education and training citizens. This paper describes the agenda and the legislation it shaped, focusing on K-12 reforms and the changing federal role in education.

by Walter Secada & Theodora Lightfoot — 1993
The focus of this chapter is on the symbolic importance of those debates. People often coalesce around issues as much because of their symbolic nature as because of theoretical or practical considerations. In this chapter, we take as given that, in order to understand the political context of bilingual education (that is, how it is situated in the politics of language and education) we must understand the symbols that frame the issues as well as the theoretical and technical debates, and how all of these ·find their expression in political actions.

by James Jacobs & Boaz Morag — 1992

by Tamar Liebes — 1992

by Julian Bond — 1991
This article discusses issues related to reconstruction and the southern civil rights movement (past, present, and future). It examines historical illiteracy, politics regarding race, and ignorance about race relations in the United States.

by Robert Boruch — 1991
In this chapter, I translate President Bush's mandate into evaluation strategies that generate evidence about what works and what works better. In doing so, I rely substantially on the efforts of the U. S. Department of Education to clarify the presidential initiative and to assure that evaluative evidence is available to make decisions about education projects and programs. I also rely on the U. S. General Accounting Office as counsel to the U.S. Congress on related matters.

by Carol Weiss — 1991
When the editors invited me to review my 1973 paper on the politics of program evaluation, it sounded like an engaging idea. In the doing, it turned out to be much less fun. There were two possibilities: that I'd changed my mind considerably (which would make me look skittish and unreliable) or that I still believed the things I'd written (which would suggest I hadn't learned much).

by John Chubb & Terry Moe — 1991
Five articles comment on Chubb and Terry M. Moe's book "Politics, Markets, and America's Schools": (1) Choice in Education: Examining the Evidence on Equity; (2) Politics, Markets, and America's Schools: A Review; (3) Political Pollyannas; (4) Degrees of Imperfection: A Note from a Political Pollyanna; and (5) Thoughts on Choice.

by Peter Cookson Jr. — 1991
A review of Politics, Markets, and America’s Schools. The author argues that market-driven school choice policies are a product of our times because they place self over society, individual gain over community action, and signal to parents and children that consumership is of higher value than the larger social good.

by Sunita Parikh — 1990
This article presents a comparative analysis of the U.S. and Indian Supreme Courts' roles in civil rights and preference policies. Despite structural and historical differences, similarities exist in the development of such policies. Both are more concerned with fidelity to constitutional and statutory interpretations than to personal ideological viewpoints.

by Luvern Cunningham — 1990
In this chapter I argue for substantial change in the structure and management of local governments, including school districts. I also call for reconsideration of the philosophy, leadership, and management of local-level institutions that affect the lives of children and youth in particular. I propose that the focus of local government be fixed on well-being, acknowledging education as primary to the quality of life for Americans of all ages. Over the next generation or two, communities need to phase out local school districts, local school boards, and local school superintendents in favor of new jurisdictions and authorities through a carefully developed and statutorily approved reconstituting process centered on the notion of well-being.

by Amy Gutmann — 1990
This article discusses the tension between civic virtue and individual freedom, a challenge for education, and proposes a "state of democratic education" which leaves maximum moral room for citizens to shape their society in an image that they can identify with their moral choices.

by David Nyberg — 1990
The teaching of values to students is unavoidable and inevitable. The problem for educators is how to choose wisely what is explicitly taught in the way of values and how to understand and control the implicit moral education in schools and in the communities that support them.

by Michael Apple — 1988
The author comments on the response to his arguments by Burbules and Kantor, stating that their response is thoughtful, well-reasoned, and articulate. They agree on much, but disagree on matters of theoretical importance (really on points of emphasis) that could affect their political/educational practice. He points to these theoretical issues here.

by Manfred Stanley — 1988
This article discusses the concept of the forum as a form of "political conversation" in America. Two forum models (liberal and democratic) are contrasted on the basis of educational objective, experiential analogy, consensus goal, and forum participants.

by Robert Anderson — 1988
Curriculum workers, supervisors, and others in leadership roles are frequently daunted by essentially political forces and pressures that call for compromise of professional standards or ethics or the diversion of energies intended to benefit children to other and less legitimate activities. In some cases, the pressures take the form of mandates or their equivalent from state governments, state agencies, or other powerful entities seeking to accomplish certain broad social or political goals through the instrument of public education. In other cases, the pressures are more localized and originate with parents, both individually and collectively, with boards of education, or with the administrative officers of the local school district. On occasion the pressures come from prestigious persons, organizations, or other opinion-influencing entities such as the media. Whatever their origins or their merit, such pressures sometimes pose enormous problems for supervisors and eventually dilute, alter, or imperil the overall quality of educational services. In this chapter we examine these pressures and consider how curriculum workers are affected by and deal with them.

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Resources
  • Education Policy Analysis Archives
    A peer-reviewed scholarly electronic journal published at Arizona State University.
  • Educational Insights
    In 1990, a graduate-student journal, Educational Insights, was initiated by the Centre to give graduate students an opportunity to reach out to other educators by publishing what they have learned from their studies and by serving in an editorial capacity to help others share their work.
  • Education Review
    Education Review (ER) publishes review articles of recently published books in education. ER contains sixteen departments covering the range of educational scholarship, and is intended to promote wider understanding of the latest and best research in the field.
  • Educational Policy
    International in scope and analytical in orientation, Educational Policy provides an interdisciplinary forum for improving education in primary and secondary schools, as well as in higher education and non-school settings.
  • The Educational Forum
    The Educational Forum presents scholarly inquiries that generate new knowledge and insights on issues of great importance in the improvement of education. It serves as a forum for learned discussion of these issues by presenting ideologically and culturally diverse viewpoints.
  • Journal of Education
    The Journal of Education addresses students and educators with regard to pertinent issues in contemporary education.
  • Journal of Educational Research
    The Journal of Educational Research publishes manuscripts that describe or synthesize research of direct relevance to educational practice in elementary and secondary schools.
  • Review of Educational Research
    Published by the The American Educational Research Association (AERA), RER presents critical, integrative reviews of research literature bearing on education. Such reviews include conceptualizations, interpretations, and syntheses of literature and scholarly work in a field or problem areas.
  • School Effectiveness and School Improvement
    The aim of the journal is to present information on research, educational practice and policy-making in the fields of school effectiveness and school improvement in a format that is accessible to both researcher and practitioner. Within this journal it will be assumed that the ultimate criterion for effectiveness and improvement is the educational progress of students regardless of family background and economic status.
  • The Australian Journal of Education
    The Australian Journal of Education publishes a wide range of articles on contemporary educational issues and quality educational research.
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