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Articles
by Myley Dang & Karen Nylund-Gibson — 2017
In this article, the authors implemented a latent class analysis to study the extent to which math attitudes and self-efficacy influence careers in science, technology, engineering, and math using the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002. Authors examined these patterns for 10th grade native and non-native English speakers and followed their trajectories ten years later.

by Angela Barton, Edna Tan & Day Greenberg — 2017
This article describes how and why youth engage in making in an after-school, youth-focused, community-based makerspace program. Using a mobilities of learning framework, authors discuss how youth appropriated and repurposed the process of making, and unpack how the program attempted to value and negotiate youths’ ways of making from an equity-oriented perspective.

by Kathleen Clark — 2017
This article reports the results of two related studies that investigated the effects of a 10-week reading intervention program in which culturally relevant texts were used for instruction on urban African American children’s reading achievement.

by Ahlam Lee — 2017
This article explores the effects of computer-based learning activities in math classrooms on STEM major selection in 4-year postsecondary institutions. The author uses a nationally representative sample of U.S. young adults who enrolled in 4-year postsecondary institutions by 2006.

by Jamie Colwell & David Reinking — 2016
This article examines the results of a ten-week formative experiment to investigate how eighth-grade history instruction could be aligned with literacy goals. We give specific focus to our collaboration with the history teacher and her implementation of an instructional intervention to scaffold students’ reading and analysis of historical texts.

by Viki Young, Ann House, David Sherer, Corinne Singleton, Haiwen Wang & Kristin Klopfenstein — 2016
This article highlights the early outcomes of the T STEM initiative in Texas, the largest investment in scaling up inclusive STEM-focused schools at the time. It describes the broad infrastructure undergirding T STEM academy development.

by Becky Huang & Alison Bailey — 2016
The current study focuses on the long-term English language outcomes of a sample of first-generation child immigrants from Asian, specifically Chinese, ethnic backgrounds.

by Jack Schneider & Sivan Zakai — 2016
This article explores the nature of the historical writing process by looking at the hallmark writing skills historians develop as they learn the craft.

by Karen Thompson — 2015
In this mixed methods study, the author uses eight years of district-wide, student-level longitudinal data to determine characteristics and overall patterns of academic achievement for Long-Term English Learners in a medium-sized California district.

by Yasuko Kanno & Jennifer Cromley — 2015
Using the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002, this study examines high-school English language learners’ pathways to four-year colleges in order to explore why ELLs’ access to four-year college is so limited.

by Rebecca Tarlau — 2015
This article examines the educational initiatives of a large agrarian social movement, the Brazilian Landless Workers’ Movement (MST), by exploring the diverse pedagogies and theories activists have drawn on to develop their alternative educational proposals for rural schools. The article analyzes this process of grassroots educational innovation, while also discussing the tensions that arise when social movements with particular visions of societal transformation demand to participate in the public school sphere.

by Brian Carolan & Jamaal Matthews — 2015
Using data derived from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009, this article examines how the social capital of students who are able to exercise curricular choice is associated with the achievement outcomes associated with these choices.

by Charles Munter, Mary Kay Stein & Margaret Smith — 2015
This article specifies two models of mathematics instruction—dialogic and direct—based on a series of conversations with nationally recognized experts who hold opposing points of view, and provides a discussion of the sources that underlie ongoing debates.

by Keith Sawyer — 2015
Drawing on the history of research on teaching creativity and on arts education, this article argues that the best way to teach for creativity is to transform domain specific education in each subject area.

by Sharon Bailin — 2015
This commentary argues that creativity is best viewed in terms of significant achievement and that such achievement is best developed through promoting critical inquiry.

by Srikala Naraian — 2015
This commentary notes the oppositional traditions that inform polarized perspectives on disability and schooling, and raises the question of the significance of such divisions for schools and for preparing teachers.

by Olga Hubard — 2015
Excerpts from a conversation on creativity with Olga Hubard, conducted prior to a symposium on the same topic at Teachers College, are interwoven with artworks by Hubard's students and professional artists.

by Erick Gordon & Ruth Vinz — 2015
This commentary details the creative process of New York City teachers and students coming together as players to remix Mary Shelley's Frankenstein in the summer of 2014.

by Beth Hennessey — 2015
In teaching and learning situations where there is one “right” answer and one best path to a solution, extrinsic incentives can be extremely effective. However, when more open-ended problems and activities are presented to students, these same extrinsic incentives have been shown to kill Western students’ intrinsic motivation and creativity. In the face of an expected reward or performance evaluation, students are unlikely to take risks and tend not to be fueled by an excitement about learning that would allow them to persist with challenging tasks until they achieve a creative outcome.

by Sandra Okita — 2015
Many technological artifacts (e.g., humanoid robots, computer agents) consist of biologically inspired features of human-like appearance and behaviors that elicit a social response. As robots cross the boundaries between humans and machines, the features of human interactions can be replicated to reveal new insights into the role of social relationships in learning and creativity. Peer robots can be designed to create ideal circumstances that enable new ways for students to reflect, reason, and learn. This paper explores how peer-like robots and robotic systems may help students learn and engage in creative ways of thinking.

by Monisha Bajaj — 2015
This article how human rights education can utilize creative and innovative approaches for meaningful learning among marginalized communities. Specifically, the approach of one non-governmental organization in India is reviewed and presented as an example of how educators and those interested in imparting knowledge of basic rights can advance a transformative form of human rights education through innovative curricula, pedagogy and co-curricular efforts.

by Kwami Coleman — 2015
This is a response essay to an interview with George E. Lewis, the Edwin H. Case Professor of American Music at Columbia University, conducted by Cara Furman of Teachers College. The essay explores Lewis's thoughts on quotidian creativity and the ubiquity of improvisation, their necessity in academic institutions, and their potentially life-transforming effects for all people.

by Nick Sousanis & Daiyu Suzuki — 2015
A collaborative effort in comics form inspired by Maxine Greene to explore the possibilities of social change in the intersections of education, philosophy, and the tree she looked upon outside her window. The authors, both former students of Greene’s, celebrate her life and teaching by continuing the conversation she began in their own unique way.

by Anthony Brown & Keffrelyn Brown — 2015
Drawing from the theories of racial formation theory and race marking, this chapter explores the durability of racial discourses in school curriculum over time in the United States. The authors’ inquiry focuses on racial discourses located in two sources of curricula knowledge: children’s literature and U.S. history textbooks.

by Sarah Selmer, Melissa Luna & James Rye — 2015
The purpose of this research is to seek insights into teachers’ experiences as they implement garden-based learning. Our results add to existing frameworks describing the relationship between the teacher and the curriculum specifically in the garden-based learning context.

by Kristen Wilcox , Hal Lawson & Janet Angelis — 2015
This article describes practices that distinguish elementary schools whose ethnically and linguistically diverse students consistently exceed expectations on English language arts assessments. Results of the multicase study show that higher achievement correlates with policies and practices that are coherently supported and sustained across classroom, school, and district levels.

by Amanda Kibler, Allison Atteberry, Christine Hardigree & April Salerno — 2015
This mixed-methods study describes the changing social networks of adolescents participating in an extracurricular dual-language program.

by Michael Gottfried & Morgan Polikoff — 2015
This research evaluates whether English Language Learner (ELL) classmates are associated with the social skills outcomes of students with disabilities in kindergarten. Using a national large-scale sample of kindergarten students, the results show that having a greater number of ELL classmates has a positive effect on the social skills outcomes for students with disabilities.

by Mary Yee — 2015
This study constitutes the secondary analysis of data collected as part of classroom instruction in a prior practitioner inquiry study. Consequently, IRB approval, parental consent, and participant assent for the present study were obtained after the conclusion of the original study.

by Susan Yonezawa — 2015
Common Core proponents and detractors debate its merits, but students have voiced their opinion for years. Using a decade’s worth of data gathered through design-research on youth voice, this article discusses what high school students have long described as more ideal learning environments for themselves—and how remarkably similar the Common Core ideals are to what kids say they want and need to learn best.

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Book Reviews
by Thomas S. C. Farrell
reviwed by Yolanda Padrón — 2019

by Geoffrey Scheurman & Ronald W. Evans (Eds.)
reviwed by Charles White — 2019

by Elizabeth Mendoza, Ben Kirshner, & Kris D. Gutiérrez
reviwed by Gladis Kersaint — 2019

by Shawn C. Rubin & Cathy Sanford
reviwed by Penny Bishop — 2019

by Marci R. McMahon, Marie T. Mora, & Ala R. Qubbaj (Eds.)
reviwed by Dianna Mullet — 2019

by Cia Verschelden
reviwed by Valerie Polakow & Katja Robinson — 2019

by Susan K. Johnsen (Ed.)
reviwed by Saiying Steenbergen-Hu & Eric Calvert — 2019

by Janice Baines, Carmen Tisdale, & Susi Long
reviwed by Arlette Willis, Melanie Kirkwood, Kendra Nalubega-Booker, Mohamed Nasir & Lourdes Bustos — 2019

by Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Rena Subotnik.& Frank Worrell (Eds.)
reviwed by Jennifer Ritchotte — 2019

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Resources
  • Discourse and Sociocultural Studies in Reading
    This article seeks to develop an integrated perspective on language, literacy, and the human mind, a perspective that holds important implications for the nature of reading, both cognitively and socioculturally.
  • Journal of Peace Education
    Journal of Peace Education publishes articles which promote discussions on theories, research and practices in peace education in varied educational and cultural settings.
  • Reading Rockets
    Reading Rockets is a national multimedia project that looks at how young kids learn to read, why so many struggle, and how caring adults can help them.
  • Teaching High School Science in the Information Age: A Review of Courses and Technology for Inquiry-based Learning
    This report reviews programs designed to improve scientific inquiry in high school classes and identifies promising curricular materials.
  • Peace Review
    Peace Review is a quarterly, multidisciplinary, transnational journal of research and analysis, focusing on the current issues and controversies that underlie the promotion of a more peaceful world.
  • P.E.4 Life
    The mission of the not-for-profit organization is to be the collective voice for promoting and expanding quality, daily physical education programs to develop active, healthy lifestyles for America's youth.
  • Classroom Assessment and the National Science Education Standards
    Focusing on the teacher as the primary player in assessment, this book offers assessment guidelines and explores how they can be adapted to the individual classroom.
  • Journal of Dance Education
    Articles appearing in the Journal of Dance Education cover the range of dance education in all settings
  • The Social Science Research Council
    This website features an extraordinary and still-expanding collection of essays by leading social scientists from around the country and the world. These are efforts by social scientists to bring theoretical and empirical knowledge to bear on the events of Sept. 11, their precursors, and what comes after.
  • Adding It Up: Helping Children Learn Mathematics
    Explores how students in pre-K through 8th grade learn mathematics and recommends how teaching, curricula, and teacher education should change to improve mathematics learning during these critical years
  • The Review of Education, Pedagogy & Cultural Studies
    The Review of Education, Pedagogy & Cultural Studies is the only journal that publishes critical essays relating pedagogy to a wide variety of political, social, cultural, and economic issues.
  • Human Rights Watch
    Human Rights Watch is dedicated to protecting the human rights of people around the world. Human Rights Watch is an independent, nongovernmental organization, supported by contributions from private individuals and foundations worldwide. It accepts no government funds, directly or indirectly.
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