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Curriculum >> Mathematics

Articles
by Roy Pea & Lee Martin — 2010
In the spirit of deepening our understanding of the social conditions of everyday uses of mathematics, the authors studied 20 diverse families with a middle school child by interviewing family members together at home about their occasions of mathematics use.

by Ilana Seidel Horn — 2010
This article explores the intersection of teacher learning and collegial interactions, reporting findings from a highly collaborative, improvement-oriented high school mathematics department. The author identifies discourse structures important to the representation and exploration of problems of practice.

by Xin Ma — 2009
This research examines the relationship between mathematics and science coursework patterns among high school graduates using data from the 2000 High School Transcript Study.

by Mark Ellis — 2008
This inquiry raises questions about the manner in which the No Child Left Behind Act aims to improve mathematics education through continued reliance on standardized testing and mandated use of scientifically based teaching practices. Specifically, it is argued that this approach is tied to assumptions about intellectual ability and achievement that precipitated the dividing practices used to justify differential access to mathematics learning almost a century ago. An examination of so-called objective and scientific approaches to school mathematics suggests the need for more earnest reflection about the particular path toward educational progress privileged by this legislation.

by Deborah Ball & Hyman Bass — 2008
Mathematics enables us to fly to the moon, track our genetic codes, create beautiful music, design our cars, build our houses, and contact others around the world almost instantaneously. However, mathematics, that abstract language which helps us to access the relationships in our physical universe(s), is rarely invoked in the service of preparing young people for democratic participation. Deborah Ball and Hyman Bass take on the challenge of situating the highly revered, somewhat mystical discipline of mathematics as a key contributor to concepts of democracy.

by Karen Dorgan — 2004
The article describes results of a qualitative study of an elementary school as it enacted a variety of strategies to help students raise scores on a newly required state test designed to serve as an accountability tool.

by Helen Patrick, Julianne Turner, Debra Meyer & Carol Midgley — 2003
Observations of the first days of school in eight sixth-grade classrooms identified three different classroom environments.

by Xin Ma — 2003
This study examined the effects of early acceleration of students in mathematics on the development of their attitude and anxiety toward mathematics across junior and senior high school, using data from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth (LSAY).

by Alan Schoenfeld — 2001
The first main section of the chapter, “The evolving content(s) of mathematics instruction,” discusses changes in the mathematics curriculum over the course of the century. The second main section, “On research: psychological, epistemological, and methodological issues,” describes the development of the discipline of research in mathematics education. A concluding discussion, “And next?,” discusses some of the evolutionary needs and pressures that may shape mathematics education in the early parts of the twenty-first century.

by Douglas Grouws & Kristin Cebulla — 2000
Our goal in this chapter is to provide an accurate characterization of the current state of elementary and middle school mathematics education in the United States and to highlight “crossroads” points where crucial reevaluations are needed.

by Michael Matthews — 2000
As one constructivist remarked, “In summary then the term ‘constructivism’ appears to be fashionable, mostly used loosely with no clear definition of the term, and is used without clear links to an epistemological base.” Although there are countless thousands of constructivist articles, it is rare to find ones with fully worked out epistemology, learning theory, educational theory, or ethical and political positions. This makes appraisal difficult.

by Deborah Ball & Hyman Bass — 2000
In this chapter, we examine the construction of mathematical knowledge in classroom teaching and learning.

by David Cohen & Heather Hill — 2000
Drawing upon a teacher survey, this article proposes that successful instructional policies are themselves instructional: teachers’ opportunities to learn about and from policy influence both their practice and, at least indirectly, student achievement.

by Xin Ma — 1999
Drawing on the Longitudinal Study of American Youth, this study examines the effects of individual characteristics and different types of parental involvement on student participation in advanced mathematics.

by Ann Gallagher — 1998
The author evaluates and extends the literature demonstrating that gender differences on standardized tests of quantitative reasoning may reflect underlying differences in cognitive processing that might be explained in part by socialization patterns inherent in American culture.

by Thomas Romberg — 1998
Background to the key notions underlying the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics

by Judith Roitman — 1998
One mathematician's view of the NCTM standards document

by Deborah Haimo — 1998
A discussion of the danger of losing the essence of mathematics

by William Clune — 1998
The author explores further the areas of agreement and disagreement across the articles about the general issue of active learning, teaching for understanding, or, at the risk of raising a red flag, constructivism.

by David Baker & Thomas Smith — 1997
The authors have selected three trends as points of discussion for this special section of the Record featuring expert commentary on the condition of education in the nation. The trends address the following issues: (1) appraising the state of academic achievement among American elementary and secondary students, (2) improving the quality of the nation’s K-12 faculty, and (3) the march toward the expansion of higher education for all students.

by George Bohrnstedt — 1997
One of two articles on academic achievement, this article discusses the performance of U.S. students on mathematics and science achievement tests compared to students in other countries. Recent data show they are performing better. This commentary examines the importance of meeting certain research conditions before drawing conclusions about achievement trends.

by David Baker & Thomas Smith — 1997
This article presents data on trends in mathematics and science achievement among U.S. students according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress and various international studies.

by DeWayne Mason & Thomas Good — 1996
An examination of curriculum, instruction, and organizational formats in multi-grade and single-grade mathematics classes

by Richard Elmore & Susan Fuhrman — 1995
This article focuses on opportunity-to-learn standards, which define a set of conditions that schools, districts, and states must meet in order to ensure students an equal opportunity to meet expectations for their performance.

by Thomas Romberg — 1983
Some mathematics should be taught to all students, but an adequate presentation of a "common curriculum" for mathematics cannot consist of a list of topics to be covered, however extensive and carefully prepared. I use the word "curriculum" as a course of study, its contents, and its organization, and my task in this chapter is to consider four questions which shape an outline for a common curriculum for mathematics. The questions to be examined are: 1. What does it mean to know mathematics? 2. Who decides on the mathematical tasks for students and for what reasons? 3. What should be the principles from which a common curriculum can be built? 4. For this yearbook, how should individual differences be considered?

by Julian Stanley — 1979
One of the most valuable types of intellectual talent for both society and the individual is mathematical reasoning ability. It undergirds much of current achievement in technology, science, and social science. Usually this ability is poorly assessed by in-school mathematics tests, because often they consist of a mixture of computation, learned concepts, and reasoning. Also, it is difficult to measure mathematical reasoning ability until the young student has acquired enough knowledge of elementary general mathematics with which to reason. The basic content of the test items must be fairly well known so that reasoning can be the chief trait measured.

by R. Wilder — 1970
Both mathematicians and historians are familiar with the fact that the evolution of counting was an extremely slow process. This has been ascertained by piecing together remains of ancient cultures turned up by archeologists and by observing the counting habits of those primitive societies that still existed during the last century.

by Lee Shulman — 1970
This chapter will not attempt a comprehensive review of literature in the psychology of mathematics learning. It will instead examine some of the current theoretical issues in psychology that have relevance to education in mathematics, citing empirical literature only for illustrative purposes.

by John Kelley & Richard Dean — 1970
This is a brief description of the development of the number system. This presentation requires very little mathematical background; it is an attempt to provide, for nonspecialists, an overall view of the successive enlargements of the concept of number which take place in the early school years. The approach we use is very near that of the best currently available commercial textbooks. These comprise the so-called second generation new math programs. But we do not discuss current and projected experimental curricula.

by H. Moredock — 1970
In this chapter, the content of the geometry and measurement program at the various grade levels will be examined, and a rationale will be offered for what is being done and for what is being proposed for the program.

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