Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements
Administration >> Leadership

Articles
by Mavis Sanders — 2018
This article draws from the literature on cross-boundary leadership, relational leadership, and relational trust, and qualitative data from a multiple case study to explore the role of principals in the administration of full-service community schools. These schools rely on family engagement and community partnerships to provide extended services and learning opportunities for children and youth in low-income, ethnically diverse communities.

by Haim Shaked & Chen Schechter — 2018
This study explored the development of holistic school leadership—an approach where principals lead schools through the systems thinking concept and procedures—over principals' different career stages, a topic that has received little research attention.

by Eleanor Drago-Severson & Patricia Maslin-Ostrowski — 2018
This research examines how effective principals framed the pressing challenges confronted in their leadership practice (technical, adaptive or mixed), and in what ways, learning was implanted in their response.

by Alex Bowers, Mark Blitz, Marsha Modeste, Jason Salisbury & Richard Halverson — 2017
This study investigates the existence and extent of significantly different subgroups of teacher and leader responses to the Comprehensive Assessment of Leadership for Learning (CALL) survey. This survey is a formative assessment of school leadership developed by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison employing the principles of distributed leadership and current research on leadership activities that promote student learning.

by James Sebastian, Elaine Allensworth & David Stevens — 2014
This article applies fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) to high school administrative and survey data to examine the relationship of school leadership and mediating organizational supports with students’ classroom participation. The study uses a configurational approach to examine combinations of supports that are associated with the varying levels of the outcome.

by Sydney Freeman Jr. & Marybeth Gasman — 2014
This study captures the background characteristics of HBCU leaders in order to lay the groundwork for future studies on HBCU presidents. It also seeks to understand the role these leaders play in grooming and mentoring the next generation of HBCU leaders.

by Bruce Kimball — 2014
Comprehensive, multi-year mass fundraising campaigns in American higher education began with the Harvard Endowment Fund (HEF) drive, which extended from 1915 to 1925. Based on the first thorough study of the archival records, this essay reveals that the campaign established novel features of university fundraising through contentious negotiations among conflicting groups, prompted the university administration to centralize and control alumni affairs and development efforts for the first time, and, above all, introduced today’s ubiquitous episodic pattern of continuous fundraising, in which mass comprehensive campaigns alternate with discrete solicitations of wealthy donors, whose dominant roles have never changed.

by Meredith Honig & Lydia Rainey — 2014
This paper explores to what extent central office administrators lead meetings of principal professional learning communities in ways that promise to strengthen principals’ development as instructional leaders and the conditions that help or hinder administrators in the process.

by Eleanor Drago-Severson — 2012
This study offers insights into how 25 principals from public, private, and Catholic schools with varying levels of financial resources (i.e., high, medium, and low) renew themselves and prevent burnout, crucial for 21st-century school leaders.

by Jason Grissom — 2011
This article examines how principal effectiveness and other determinants of teachers’ work environments explain teacher satisfaction and turnover. Using national data, it finds that effective principals have an even greater impact on teacher outcomes in schools with large numbers of disadvantaged students than in other schools, suggesting that policies focused on getting the best principals into the most challenging school environments may be effective strategies for lowering perpetually high teacher turnover rates in those schools.

by Denise Armstrong — 2010
This article examines the socialization rites that newly appointed secondary school vice-principals experienced as they negotiated the passage between teaching and administration.

by Carola Suarez-Orozco , Allyson Pimentel & Margary Martin — 2009
The role of relationships in mediating immigrant newcomers’ academic engagement and performance is examined using a mixed-methods approach.

by Luis Fraga & Roy Elis — 2009
In this article, we determine whether the greater presence of Latinos on school boards in California is related to greater representation of coethnics among educational administrators and teachers. We then examine if there is any relationship between greater representation in the educational bureaucracy, and more favorable educational outcomes for Latino students.

by Marnie Curry — 2008
This article examines school-based professional inquiry communities known as Critical Friends Groups, analyzing how four design features—their diverse menu of activities, their decentralized structure, their interdisciplinary membership, and their reliance on structured conversation tools called “protocols”—influence the capacity of these groups to pursue whole-school reform and instructional improvement.

by Michael Knapp, Michael Copland & Juli Swinnerton — 2007
Educational leaders have always had “data” of some kind available to them when making decisions. Gathering whatever information they could readily access, and drawing on accumulated experience, intuition, and political acumen, leaders have pursued what they viewed as the wisest courses of action. However, in many cases, the data drawn into the decision-making process was unsystematically gathered, incomplete, or insufficiently nuanced to carry the weight of important decisions.

by M. King — 2004
One of the prominent ways in which educational leaders shape school conditions and teaching practices is through their beliefs and actions regarding teacher learning. Of course, leaders must still attend to myriad important matters, such as selection, assignment, and retention of teachers; utilization of financial and other material resources; and cultivation of school-level leadership and school-family-community relations. But the shift to a greater emphasis on the instructional role of leaders should be paramount. In this chapter, I will address school- and district-level leadership for teacher workforce development through improving teacher learning and capacity.

by Paul Pitre & Wade Smith — 2004
This article examines the centrist leader perspective of the ISLLC standards and argues that the centrist view undermines the potential for collaborative leadership in schools.

by Joseph Cronin & Michael Usdan — 2003
Major cities in the United States, unhappy with persistent achievement gaps between students of different races and socioeconomic backgrounds, now search for highly effective medicine men who will upgrade urban school productivity. These efforts stand in stark contrast to the first two hundred years of the Republic, when villages relied on local ministers, elders, or farmers with extra time in the winter to visit the schools, many of which operated for only a few months of the year.

by Mavis Sanders & Adia Harvey — 2002
This case study describes how one urban elementary school in a high-reform district and state has been able to develop strong connections with community businesses and organizations as part of its program of school, family, and community partnerships. The case study identifies four factors that allowed the school to build successful bridges to its community. These factors are: a) the school's commitment to learning; b) the principal's support and vision for community involvement; c) the school's receptivity and openness to community involvement; and d) the school's willingness to engage in two-way communication with potential community partners about their level and kind of involvement.

by Ellen Goldring & William Greenfield — 2002
Buffeted during the past 20 years by successive waves of educational reform, educational administration is more aware today than at any time in the field’s history of the complexities and challenges of public education, and of the importance of effective educational leadership to the enduring good health of that institution (Murphy & Louis, 1999).

by Catherine Lugg, Katrina Bulkley, William Firestone & C. Garner — 2002
This chapter seeks to map the contextual terrain facing contemporary educational leaders, noting six key interrelated features of the ever-shifting landscape: the political, the economic, the financial, the accountability, the demographic, and the staffing terrain.

by Kenneth Leithwood & Nona Prestine — 2002
This chapter consists of two main sections. The first section reviews what we know about the challenges facing leaders in highly accountable contexts and the nature of productive responses on their part. This review encompasses both theoretical and empirical literatures, and most of it is specifically focused on school-level leadership. While little evidence has been reported about district-level leadership in accountability-oriented contexts, such leadership appears to be central to success. The second main section of the chapter reports a case study of an exemplary district’s efforts to make the most of large-scale reform initiated in the state of Illinois.

by Joseph Murphy — 2002
I begin by reviewing the methods traditionally used to define the profession and its work. I suggest that these methods will not prove successful in reculturing school leadership and argue for an alternative method to locate an appropriate portal to the future. In so doing, I retrace the steps that led to a new perspective, one that is based on the powerful unifying concepts of social justice, democratic community, and school improvement. Second, using this alternative way of framing the profession, I present one framework for recasting the concept of leadership.

by James Spillane & Karen Seashore Louis — 2002
Our goal in this paper is not to undertake an exhaustive review of the literature on school improvement, but rather to frame or perhaps reframe this work. Specifically, we stand back from scholarship that falls under the school improvement rubric and develop a conceptual scaffold for thinking about this line of research and its relation to teaching and learning in schools.

by Gail Furman & Robert Starratt — 2002
What would it mean for democratic community to be the center for educational leadership in schools, and how would this choice re-culture the profession?

by Colleen Larson & Khaula Murtadha — 2002
Researchers and leaders for social justice, then, seek to define the theories and practices of leadership that are vital to creating greater freedom, opportunity, and justice for all citizens—citizens who, through public education, are better able to participate in and sustain a free, civil, multicultural, and democratic society.

by Mark Smylie, Sharon Conley & Helen Marks — 2002
We begin with a brief historical review describing the evolution of teacher leadership since the early 1900s. Then we examine teacher research as a form of teacher leadership. We explore several models of distributive school leadership. Finally we consider self-managed teams as means of teacher leadership and substitutes for administrative leadership.

by Gary Crow, Charles Hausman & Jay Scribner — 2002
This chapter begins with an identification of how work roles have changed, and are changing, in the 21st century. This change is represented primarily by greater complexity in how work is performed. In light of this change, the remainder of the chapter focuses on the internal and external complexities that contribute to reshaping the principal’s role.

by C. Cryss Brunner, Margaret Grogan & Lars Björk — 2002
In this chapter, we seek answers by examining the discourse of the superintendency to try to determine what has shaped the role previously and what is likely to shape it in the future.

by Sharon Rallis, Mark Shibles & Austin Swanson — 2002
The chapter begins by examining the natural tensions that exist among groups, both lay and professional, that have different local, state, and national perspectives and responsibilities. It then explores the potential of lay volunteers in altering school culture for the better, and the role of laypeople in formally defined roles on school boards and advisory councils. The chapter concludes with a proposal for repositioning lay leadership to better meet the needs of our increasingly diverse public.

Found 84
Displaying 1 to 30
<Back | Next>
Recent Posts
 
Book Reviews
by Jonathan A. Plucker & Scott J. Peters
reviwed by M. Jayne Fleener — 2017

by William H. Warring Jr.
reviwed by NaYoung Hwang — 2017

by Autumn Tooms Cyprès
reviwed by Carrie Sampson & Emerald Ochonogor — 2017

by Sharon L. Nichols
reviwed by Ross Roholt & Tracy Leitl — 2017

by Terri Friel
reviwed by Linda Clark — 2017

by David Landis & Sapargul Mirseitova
reviwed by Karon LeCompte — 2017

by Nel Noddings & Laurie Brooks
reviwed by Dia Davis & Vonzell Agosto — 2017

by Anthony A. Piña, Jason B. Huett, & Charles Schlosser (Eds.)
reviwed by Oksana Vorobel — 2017

by Mark Hlavacik
reviwed by Richard Welsh & Shafiqua Little — 2017

Found 130
Displaying 11 to 20
<Back | Next>

Resources
Found 28Displaying 11 to 20 | Next>
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS