Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements
 
Teacher Education


Articles
by Edward Britton — 2012
This chapter draws from recent qualitative studies of nine mathematics-specific induction programs around the country and abroad. Half of the U.S. programs were created with support from the National Science Foundation to specifically serve mathematics novices; the other programs served beginning teachers of all subjects and grades and included program strategies focused on mathematics-specific needs of their beginning secondary teachers. The chapter explores the mathematics-specific needs of beginning mathematics teachers, the strengths and challenges of programs aimed at addressing such needs, and dimensions to be considered in matching mathematics mentors with mentees and training the mentors. The chapter closes by noting the implications for induction policies.

by Pamela Grossman, Susanna Loeb, Jeannie Myung, Donald Boyd, Hamilton Lankford & James Wyckoff — 2012
Mentoring programs for beginning teachers have grown in prominence in school districts nationwide as a strategy for inducting new teachers into the profession and promoting retention. In 2004, the New York City Department of Education invested $36 million in a teacher mentoring program for all first-year teachers to address the dual problems of high teacher attrition and low student achievement. The authors use survey data from first-year teachers in combination with district-level administrative data to investigate the effectiveness of this mentoring program in meeting the needs of beginning teachers.

by Sharon Feiman-Nemser & Cynthia Carver — 2012
Based on a study of three well-regarded induction programs, this chapter examines how state and district policies regarding new teacher induction shape the practice of mentors and the learning of beginning teachers. The authors argue that induction policies must help program leaders, district and school administrators, and mentor teachers understand the potential of development-oriented mentoring and the conditions on which it depends.

by Barnett Berry & Ann Byrd — 2012
This chapter points to a new era of teaching and employs current research surrounding new teacher induction and mentoring programs to underline the need for an innovative model of support for novice teachers. Berry and Byrd draw on their experiences building virtual communities of teachers and a virtual mentoring pilot program to examine the prospects for increasing consistency in the effectiveness of new teacher support through online networks.

by Marjorie Wechsler, Kyra Caspary, Daniel Humphrey & Kavita Matsko — 2012
This chapter examines the implementation and outcomes of state-funded induction programs in Illinois, and finds important contributions to increasing the effectiveness of beginning teachers. However, even when program supports for new teachers are intensive and focus on instruction, a poor school climate and weak leadership can undermine the program. The authors question the current conception of new teacher induction as an isolated program and call for a more comprehensive approach linking teacher induction with whole-school improvement.

by Julie Luft — 2012
It is important that content specialists have induction programs that are tailored to their needs, given that content knowledge is important during instruction. Unfortunately, most content specialists (including science teachers) don't experience content-focused induction programs. In an effort to illuminate the need for this type of induction program, this chapter provides an overview of the programs and research that the author has conducted with beginning secondary teachers.

by Martha Bleeker, Sarah Dolfin, Amy Johnson, Steve Glazerman, Eric Isenberg & Mary Grider — 2012
This study provides a detailed portrait of typical induction support provided to beginning elementary school teachers during the 2005-2006 school year in 17 high-poverty urban school districts around the country.

by Richard Ingersoll & Michael Strong — 2012
This chapter provides a review of empirical studies that have evaluated the effects of induction. The chapter's objective is to provide researchers, policy makers, and educators with a reliable and current assessment of what is known and not known about the effectiveness of teacher induction and mentoring programs. A second objective is to identify gaps in the research base and pinpoint relevant questions that have not been addressed and that warrant further research.

by Andrew Wayne — 2012
This final chapter digests the core chapters of this volume, which draws together some of the most sophisticated thinking on new teacher induction from the last decade. In so doing, this chapter attends to five key understandings about induction programs, including their context, design, implementation, and outcomes. These understandings emerge as highly relevant to those who design induction programs as well as researchers, as they continue to build the knowledge base on teacher induction.

by Erik Malewski, Suniti Sharma & JoAnn Phillion — 2012
In this article, we examine how international field experiences promote cross-cultural awareness in U.S. American preservice teachers through experiential learning. The findings we present are based on a 6-year study of a short-term study abroad program in Honduras and contribute to the effort to prepare future teachers for culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms beginning at the preservice level.

by Steven Athanases, Juliet Wahleithner & Lisa Bennett — 2012
Student teachers in a teacher credential program featuring teacher inquiry evidenced many indicators of attention to the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students in their inquiry products and processes.

by Marylin Chambliss, Patricia Alexander & Jeremy Price — 2012
This analytical article focuses a philosophical lens on quality teaching in general, mathematics and reading education, and prominent research paradigms. It then turns the same lens on the High-Quality Teaching (HQT) study, an examination of what teachers do to help fourth- and fifth-grade students succeed in reading and mathematics. Our intent is to demonstrate how such philosophical scrutiny can lead to a fuller understanding of high-quality teaching in its varied manifestations.

by Mary Juzwik, Michael Sherry, Samantha Caughlan, Anne Heintz & Carlin Borsheim-Black — 2012
Using emerging digital technologies within a teacher education pedagogy emphasizing expanded definitions and modes of literacy can support teacher candidates in understanding, leading, collaboratively critiquing, and improving classroom interactions across diverse contexts. We describe and theorize a program-wide project to implement such a pedagogy in secondary English teacher preparation: Video Based Response and Revision (VBBR).

by Jason Irizarry — 2011
This article reports the findings of an ethnographic study in which a cohort of Latino/a preservice teachers was followed from the teachers’ recruitment into college, through their undergraduate years and, for most, their eventual transition into the teaching profession. Using critical race theory (CRT) and Latino/a critical race theory (LatCrit) as analytic lenses, various sites within an institution of higher education where students experienced racialized marginalization are identified.

by Kristie Phillips, Laura Desimone & Thomas Smith — 2011
This article assesses the relationship between teachers’ participation in content-focused professional development and state and school policies.

by Jane Neapolitan — 2011
The idea of “currency” is implied in the title, for, as many of our contributors discuss within their chapters, the professional development school (PDS) cannot and will not prevail in its present form without dedicated fiscal backing and sustained commitment for integrating the PDS effort into new structures.

by Alison Rutter — 2011
As a result of the government’s criticism, a plethora of reform agendas and reports were commissioned, trying to make sense of the issues and find long-term solutions. Among these are four key efforts that laid the groundwork for the professional development schools (PDS) movement.

by Jane Neapolitan & Marsha Levine — 2011
In this chapter, we build on the discussion of the history, trends, and issues of the PDS effort described in Chapter 1 (Rutter, 2011) while examining the approaches for PDS implementation set forth by organizations that have had a major influence on PDS development.

by Kenneth Howey — 2011
The authors don’t attempt to overstate the scope of development or level of impact with respect to PDS. On the positive side, they remind us that hundreds of NCATE’s accredited institutions report that they are engaged in PDS partnerships, involving at least one, and often more than one, school partner.

by Sharon Castle & Kathleen Reilly — 2011
In this chapter, we build on the discussion of the history, trends, and issues of the PDS effort described in Chapter 1 (Rutter, 2011) while examining the approaches for PDS implementation set forth by organizations that have had a major influence on PDS development.

by Jim Nolan Jr., Doris Grove, Horatio Leftwich, Kelly Mark & Brian Peters — 2011
The focus of this chapter is on the evidence to date that documents the impact of PDS engagement on four specific groups of participants: veteran P–12 teachers, university faculty, P–12 school principals, and parents and community members.

by Pia Lindquist Wong & Ronald Davis Glass — 2011
In this chapter, we review the existing literature with a focus on three key areas: (1) the ways in which PDS models are structured to improve student learning, yielding a rich description of PDS interventions for student achievement; (2) the impact of PDSs on student learning and achievement, with a specific focus on publications that used rigorous research designs and/or captured student achievement with multiple measures; and (3) the extent to which PDSs have a differential impact on the learning of low-income and culturally and racially diverse students.

by A. Lin Goodwin — 2011
All the authors also caution us that the evidence is not always robust, that much more evidence is needed, and that there are many additional related lines of inquiry that require exploration. But, these cautions aside, the three chapters each use the research to go inside PDS settings and classrooms and provide an up-close look at implementation and results in relation to teacher preparation, professional development, and impact on students.

by Bernard Badiali — 2011
The purpose of the chapter is to serve program evaluators and stakeholders as they formulate an approach to assessing the effectiveness of their professional development school (PDS) program.

by Jeanne Tunks — 2011
This chapter represents an in-depth study of action research in the PDS with recommendations for future practice and collaboration.

by Linda Catelli — 2011
My approach to writing this chapter is to comment first on the two essays and then provide readers with my personal history intertwined with my own perspective and recommendations for the future. My history and past experiences with action research in school–university partnership settings and with schools as self-renewing institutions have dramatically shaped my perspective on PDS as leverage for education change, improvement, and reform.

by Carole Basile & Cindy Gutierrez — 2011
In this chapter, we briefly examine the literature related to roles, structures, and governance and the typical players in PDSs, while making a case for the rediscovery of the community as having a critical role in PDS work.

by Diane Yendol-Hoppey & Jason Smith — 2011
The rapid proliferation of newly established professional development schools (PDS) partnerships accentuated concern associated with the lack of conceptual clarity of the PDS concept itself. Levine and Churins (1999) warned the PDS community that this innovative institution needed standards to ensure the necessary rigor, accountability, and sustainability.

by Donna Wiseman — 2011
Long-term PDSs have been successful at navigating accountability, resource, and infrastructure issues as partnerships are shaped and modified to meet the needs of the schools and universities.

by Lee Teitel — 2011
Writing this afterword pulls me back in. The fine scholarly work of the Yearbook—its focus on history and purpose, on research and impacts, on structures, roles and accountability, and on leveraging change—has enabled me to reconnect with my roots and passion. Rip Van Winkle, looking with a fresh set of eyes on something that is both familiar and removed. Here’s what stands out to me.

Found 345
Displaying 31 to 60
<Back | Next>
 
Recent Posts
 
Book Reviews
by Alan V. Brown & Gregory L. Thompson
reviwed by Michael Guerrero & Maria Guerrero — 2018

by Andrea M. Kent & André M. Green (Eds.)
reviwed by Sheri Williams & Joseph DeBonis — 2018

by Mary E. Dilworth
reviwed by Amanda Vickery — 2018

by S. G. Grant, John Lee, & Kathy Swan (Eds.)
reviwed by Kathryn Engebretson — 2018

by Helen M. G. Watt, Paul W. Richardson, & Kari Smith (Eds.)
reviwed by Kenneth Carano — 2018

by Valerie A. Storey (Ed.)
reviwed by Karen Huchting — 2018

by Jeffrey S. Brooks & Anthony H. Normore (Eds.)
reviwed by Jerome Delaney — 2018

by John P. Miller & Kelli Nigh (Eds.)
reviwed by Lisa Lucas — 2018

by Christopher C. Martell (Ed.)
reviwed by Janie Hubbard — 2018

Found 194
Displaying 1 to 10
<Back | Next>

Resources
  • Phi Delta Kappan
    The Phi Delta Kappan publishes articles concerned with educational research, service, and leadership; issues, trends, and policy are emphasized.
  • Teacher Education Accreditation Council
    The Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC)is a nonprofit organization of institutions of higher education and other groups and individuals devoted to the improvement of academic degree programs for professional educators.
  • Staff Development Policy: Fuzzy Choices in an Imperfect Market
    It is argued here that staff development in the public elementary and secondary schools of the United States is misguided in both policy and practice.
  • Issues in the Undergraduate Mathematics Preparation of School Teachers: The Journal
    The Journal is intended to provide a formal forum for the dissemination of the research results, insights, and ideas of professional educators and mathematicians on the wide variety of issues that pertain to the college level mathematics preparation of future K-12 teachers.
  • Educational Insights
    In 1990, a graduate-student journal, Educational Insights, was initiated by the Centre to give graduate students an opportunity to reach out to other educators by publishing what they have learned from their studies and by serving in an editorial capacity to help others share their work.
  • Educational Review
    Educational Review publishes general articles and accounts of research of interest to teachers, to lecturers, to research workers in education and educational psychology, and to students of education.
  • Educational Researcher
    Published by the American Educational Research Association, the Educational Researcher features section publishes manuscripts that report, synthesize, review, or analyze scholarly inquiry, especially manuscripts that focus on the interpretation, implication, or significance of R&D work in education, and manuscripts that examine developments important to the R&D field.
  • Education Review
    Education Review (ER) publishes review articles of recently published books in education. ER contains sixteen departments covering the range of educational scholarship, and is intended to promote wider understanding of the latest and best research in the field.
  • American Journal of Education
    The American Journal of Education is devoted to original inquiries in education, to the evaluation and synthesis of educational scholarship, and to scholarly commentary of educational practice.
  • FORUM: for promoting 3-19 comprehensive education
    FORUM has for almost forty years been the pre-eminent focal point in the United Kingdom for topical and informed analysis - very often highly forthright and critical - of all aspects of government policy as it influences the education of children from primary through to higher education.
Found 34Displaying 11 to 20 | Next>
 
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS