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Articles
by Juliet Wahleithner — 2018
This study uses five case studies to examine high school English teachers’ instruction of writing while taking into account their preparation for teaching writing, the instructional policies in place, and the learners in their classrooms.

by Stuart Yeh — 2017
Evidence regarding the reliability and validity of value-added teacher rankings, evidence that National Board for Professional Teaching Standards teacher certification is a reliable measure, but a weak predictor, of gains in student performance, and evidence from a path analysis suggest reasons to question the prevailing view that the contribution of teachers to student performance is the largest factor influencing student achievement.

by Susan Yoon, Jessica Koehler Yom , Zhitong Yang & Lei Liu — 2017
This study compares teachers’ social and human capital variables to see which of the two predict growth in classroom implementation of a high school science intervention based in cognitively rich and technology curricula.

by Nicole Louie — 2017
This article highlights four types of resources that appear critical for supporting teacher learning through investigation of two cases of close teacher engagement with equity-oriented practice and two cases of relatively low engagement.

by Christine Andrews-Larson, Jonee Wilson & Adrian Larbi-Cherif — 2017
In this article, the authors examine the focus and facilitation of teachers’ collaborative conversations in schools that exhibited growth in instructional quality.

by Leslie Burns & sj Miller — 2017
This article describes the development of the first formally accepted national standard for social justice teacher education in U.S. history. The article culminates in a discussion of how policymaking influences professional realizations about social justice as a matter of fundamental education policy reform and local practice.

by Kenneth Zeichner & Hilary Conklin — 2016
This paper analyzes how research has been misused in debates about the future of teacher education and offers several specific suggestions for improving the quality of this debate.

by Meg Riordan, Emily Klein & Reva Jaffe-Walter — 2016
This study explores how three organizations—Big Picture Learning, EL Education, and Internationals Network—meet the challenges of growing effective teacher learning communities while also scaling their school designs across geographies.

by Kevin Bastian, C. Kevin Fortner, Alisa Chapman, M. Jayne Fleener, Ellen McIntyre & Linda Patriarca — 2016
This article calls for the creation of partnerships between teacher preparation programs and researchers or state education agencies to share individual-level data on program graduates with teacher preparation programs.

by Bradley Ermeling & Jessica Yarbo — 2016
This case study of two secondary school teacher teams explored the potential of collaborative partnerships with outside content experts (OCEs) for infusing new resources and perspectives that move beyond persistent images of classroom instruction. Findings reveal several pivotal episodes of interaction with clear evidence of OCE influence on teacher instructional plans.

by Teija Löytönen — 2016
By using the field of dance education in Finland as an example and by describing the critical incidents that occurred during the collaborative knowledge creation process amongst the participating dance professionals this article sheds light to a more general phenomenon of facilitating the creation of new knowledge in professional contexts, that are characterized by epistemic diversity or specificity. In so doing, the article offers some insights into how collaborative inquiry could offer a more practitioner-based and context-sensitive social space to enhance sensible meaning making and actionable knowledge creation.

by Rebecca Powell, Susan Chambers Cantrell, Victor Malo-Juvera & Pamela Correll — 2016
In this article, we share results of a mixed methods study that examined the use of the Culturally Responsive Instruction Observation Protocol (CRIOP) model in elementary classrooms.

by Vanessa Seriki, Cory Brown & Kenneth Fasching-Varner — 2015
This chapter chronicles the experiences of three friends who journey from being students in teacher education to junior faculty in the field. Using critical race theory as an analytical tool, the three friends highlight the ways in which racism exists and is manifested in three different teacher education programs.

by Robyn Seglem & Antero Garcia — 2015
As teacher education programs have struggled with how to best reconcile the needs of students of color with the experiences and misconceptions of White teachers, this study looks at how digital tools can be leveraged to support culturally responsive pedagogy.

by Dennis Barr, Beth Boulay, Robert Selman, Rachel McCormick, Ethan Lowenstein, Beth Gamse, Melinda Fine & M. Brielle Leonard — 2015
This article reports on a randomized controlled experiment examining the impact of a professional development intervention that helps teachers foster students’ historical thinking skills, social and ethical reflection, and civic learning.

by Emery Petchauer — 2014
This two-year qualitative study used the theoretical constructs of identity contingencies and situational cues to explore the experiences of 22 African American preservice teachers in their teacher licensure testing events. Findings illustrate that race can become a salient dimension of the testing event through (a) interactions with test proctors and site administrators and (b) actions of other test takers that inadvertently cue racial stereotypes and judgments.

by Marilyn Cochran-Smith, Fiona Ell, Larry Ludlow, Lexie Grudnoff & Graeme Aitken — 2014
This article examines the challenges and promises of complexity theory as a theoretical framework for teacher education research.

by Charles Peck & Morva McDonald — 2014
In this article, documented accounts of evidence-based program renewal in two teacher education programs are interpreted through the lens of Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT).

by Chen Schechter & Tova Michalsky — 2014
The present study explored the value of systematic learning from success as a complementary reflective framework during the practicum phase in teacher preparatory programs. Results indicated greater performance improvement on pedagogical content knowledge measures and on sense of self-efficacy measures when contemplating both problematic and successful experiences than when focusing solely on problematic experiences.

by Randi Stanulis & Susan Brondyk — 2013
This article analyzes the complexities involved in learning to mentor, by considering how role identity and context influence two mentors as they experience the same professional development program.

by Hilda Borko & Janette Klingner — 2013
To meet the growing demand for teacher learning opportunities, the educational community must create scalable professional development models and study their effectiveness. In this chapter, we argue that design-based implementation research (DBIR) is ideally suited to these efforts, and we use two research projects in which we are currently involved as illustrative cases: CSR Colorado and Implementing the Problem-Solving Cycle (iPSC). The core of CSR Colorado is Collaborative Strategic Reading, an instructional approach designed to enhance reading comprehension in content classes. The focus of iPSC is the Problem-Solving Cycle, a mathematics professional development (PD) program designed to help teachers improve their instruction through closely examining mathematics problems, student thinking, and pedagogical practices. Each project works with a school district to bring a PD model to scale, and both projects are studying the structures and resources needed to build the district’s capacity to sustain the model beyond the duration of the research. The chapter describes each project and discusses the successes and challenges we experienced as we collaborated with the districts and schools to carry them out. By highlighting two very different projects we show how, through different means, it is possible to achieve the same ultimate end of a scaled-up program for improving instructional practices.

by Anne Whitney & Linda Friedrich — 2013
In this article, we explore the legacy of the National Writing Project, a thirty-seven-year-old professional development network dedicated to improving the teaching of writing, focusing on the broader orientations developed within that network rather than solely on the transmission of specific teaching strategies.

by Laura Desimone, Thomas Smith & Kristie Phillips — 2013
This is a three-year longitudinal study that links teacher participation in content-focused professional development in mathematics to the use of particular types of instruction, and then examines links between those types of instruction and student achievement.

by Matthew Sanger & Richard Osguthorpe — 2013
This chapter examines the gap between the widespread acknowledgment that teaching is a moral endeavor, on the one hand, and the lack of explicit, systematic teacher education research and practice to support preparing teachers for the moral aspects of teaching. After providing an initial description of the aforementioned gap, the chapter surveys the evidence that such a gap exists, then takes up a number of themes found in the literature bordering the gap. It concludes with a discussion of possible paths for teacher education research and practice to move forward.

by Lauren Anderson & Jamy Stillman — 2013
This article begins with one student teacher’s recounted example of classroom practice and then draws on cultural historical activity theory to consider how teacher educators might have better supported this student teacher, thereby enhancing her own and her students’ learning.

by Marilyn Cochran-Smith, Matthew Cannady, Kirstin McEachern, Kara Mitchell, Peter Piazza, Christine Power & Amy Ryan — 2012
This article provides a conceptual analysis of empirical research that examines the connection between teachers’ education and its outcomes, consequences, or results, and then links this research to the political controversies and the local and larger policy debates that have shaped it. The article identifies six genres that capture the multiple ways researchers from different disciplines and with different intentions have conceptualized and studied these connections.

by Morgaen Donaldson — 2012
Entrants to teaching from other careers potentially provide a source of teachers for hard-to-staff rural and urban schools. Based on retrospective, longitudinal data collected through a survey of over 2,000 Teach For America (TFA) teachers who began their careers in schools serving high proportions of low-income and minority children, I found that older TFA entrants to teaching had a lower risk than did younger entrants of leaving low-income schools, the teaching profession, and broader school-based roles. I further found that, among those who left teaching, older entrants’ reasons for doing so differed from those of their younger counterparts.

by Peter Youngs, Kenneth Frank, Yeow Meng Thum & Mark Low — 2012
In this chapter, we develop a theory to explain the effects of mentoring and induction activities on new teachers' commitment, instructional quality, and effectiveness, and we describe how utility functions can express variation in these outcomes. Then we explicate the role of three-level models (i.e., with random effects) in estimating the effects of effort on commitment, instructional quality, and student achievement with teachers nested within subgroups within schools.

by Edward Britton — 2012
This chapter draws from recent qualitative studies of nine mathematics-specific induction programs around the country and abroad. Half of the U.S. programs were created with support from the National Science Foundation to specifically serve mathematics novices; the other programs served beginning teachers of all subjects and grades and included program strategies focused on mathematics-specific needs of their beginning secondary teachers. The chapter explores the mathematics-specific needs of beginning mathematics teachers, the strengths and challenges of programs aimed at addressing such needs, and dimensions to be considered in matching mathematics mentors with mentees and training the mentors. The chapter closes by noting the implications for induction policies.

by Pamela Grossman, Susanna Loeb, Jeannie Myung, Donald Boyd, Hamilton Lankford & James Wyckoff — 2012
Mentoring programs for beginning teachers have grown in prominence in school districts nationwide as a strategy for inducting new teachers into the profession and promoting retention. In 2004, the New York City Department of Education invested $36 million in a teacher mentoring program for all first-year teachers to address the dual problems of high teacher attrition and low student achievement. The authors use survey data from first-year teachers in combination with district-level administrative data to investigate the effectiveness of this mentoring program in meeting the needs of beginning teachers.

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Book Reviews
by Victoria J. Risko & MaryEllen Vogt
reviwed by Jennifer Tuten & Mallory Locke — 2017

by Troy Hicks, Anne Elrod Whitney, James Fredricksen, & Leah Zuidema
reviwed by Elsie Lindy Olan — 2017

by Christine M. Dawson
reviwed by Rebecca Woodard — 2017

by Steven P. Jones
reviwed by James Davis — 2016

by Shelley B. Wepner, Diane W. Gómez, Katie Egan Cunningham, Kristin N. Rainville, & Courtney Kelly
reviwed by Stephanie Bennett — 2016

by Eleanor Drago-Severson and Jessica Blum-DeStefano
reviwed by Susan Brondyk — 2016

by Aimee A. Howley and Mary Barbara Trube
reviwed by Linda Tilman — 2016

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Resources
  • Phi Delta Kappan
    The Phi Delta Kappan publishes articles concerned with educational research, service, and leadership; issues, trends, and policy are emphasized.
  • Teacher Education Accreditation Council
    The Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC)is a nonprofit organization of institutions of higher education and other groups and individuals devoted to the improvement of academic degree programs for professional educators.
  • Staff Development Policy: Fuzzy Choices in an Imperfect Market
    It is argued here that staff development in the public elementary and secondary schools of the United States is misguided in both policy and practice.
  • Issues in the Undergraduate Mathematics Preparation of School Teachers: The Journal
    The Journal is intended to provide a formal forum for the dissemination of the research results, insights, and ideas of professional educators and mathematicians on the wide variety of issues that pertain to the college level mathematics preparation of future K-12 teachers.
  • Educational Insights
    In 1990, a graduate-student journal, Educational Insights, was initiated by the Centre to give graduate students an opportunity to reach out to other educators by publishing what they have learned from their studies and by serving in an editorial capacity to help others share their work.
  • Educational Review
    Educational Review publishes general articles and accounts of research of interest to teachers, to lecturers, to research workers in education and educational psychology, and to students of education.
  • Educational Researcher
    Published by the American Educational Research Association, the Educational Researcher features section publishes manuscripts that report, synthesize, review, or analyze scholarly inquiry, especially manuscripts that focus on the interpretation, implication, or significance of R&D work in education, and manuscripts that examine developments important to the R&D field.
  • Education Review
    Education Review (ER) publishes review articles of recently published books in education. ER contains sixteen departments covering the range of educational scholarship, and is intended to promote wider understanding of the latest and best research in the field.
  • American Journal of Education
    The American Journal of Education is devoted to original inquiries in education, to the evaluation and synthesis of educational scholarship, and to scholarly commentary of educational practice.
  • FORUM: for promoting 3-19 comprehensive education
    FORUM has for almost forty years been the pre-eminent focal point in the United Kingdom for topical and informed analysis - very often highly forthright and critical - of all aspects of government policy as it influences the education of children from primary through to higher education.
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