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by Camika Royal & Simone Gibson — 2017
In this article, authors argue that school reform models employing neoliberalism, hyperaccountability, and hyperstandardization, replete with their demands on educators of conformity, sameness, and silence, have subdued educators’ concern for culturally relevant pedagogy and made high test scores the sole entity for which educators should aim.

by April Warren-Grice — 2017
This article examines culturally relevant pedagogy through the lens of advocacy by focusing on Black educators who serve as Educational Cultural Negotiators to help students of color in these spaces academically and socially.

by Celia Anderson, Erika Bullock, Beverly Cross & Angiline Powell — 2017
In this analytic essay, the authors consider the challenges to implementing culturally relevant pedagogy in a hyper-reform urban setting. The authors use Memphis as a particular context to outline these challenges and offer a framework describing the conceptual shifts that would support culturally relevant pedagogy in this context and others like it.

by H. Richard Milner IV — 2017
12 recent articles between 2004-2014 were randomly selected that examined mathematics or English language arts, culturally relevant pedagogy, and race. The following interrelated questions were considered in the review synthesis: (a) What are some essential findings from the articles, (b) how is culturally relevant pedagogy operationalized and/or employed in the studies/articles, and (c) how is race examined in the studies?

by Ayana Allen, Stephen Hancock, Chance Lewis & Tehia Starker-Glass — 2017
This article examines teacher education programs and proposes the integration and mapping of culturally relevant pedagogy into teacher education policies and programs, curriculum and instruction, and teacher educators and candidates. We present a critical framework for promoting cultural competence, critical consciousness, and academic achievement through critical reflection, social justice action, and critical questioning.

by Sharon Nichols & Felicia Castro-Villarreal — 2016

by Peter Martin — 2016
This article presents a longitudinal study of an urban charter middle school to examine the impact testing pressures can have on the education of students with disabilities and English language learners, and how this may lead to a narrowing of the content they are taught.

by Felicia Castro-Villarreal & Sharon Nichols — 2016
This article provides a general overview of educational policy and practice as it relates to special education student populations.

by Adai Tefera & Catherine Kramarczuk Voulgarides — 2016
This article critically examines the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and No Child Left Behind. Authors demonstrate how and why these policies have failed to adequately ensure that students of color with disabilities receive the educational opportunities the policies were intended to provide.

by Jeanette Joyce, Judith Harrison & Danielle Murphy — 2016
The purpose of this article is to discuss student learning objectives as components of high-stakes teacher evaluation systems, within the context of learners with special needs.

by Jessica Bacon, Carrie Rood & Beth Ferri — 2016
This paper critically examines a resultant phenomenon of the Standards-Based Reform movement: the emergence of self-contained Prioritized Curriculum classes, designed to provide students with disabilities access to standards-based general education curriculum in segregated classes.

by Robert Cotto Jr. — 2016
Connecticut experienced two major changes in testing policy for children with disabilities that played a major role in conclusions about educational progress in the state. The responses to these changes in testing policy make Connecticut an illuminating case regarding the problem of high-stakes testing and changes in policies for students with disabilities in a state characterized by deep racial and economic inequity.

by George Theoharis, Julie Causton & Chelsea Tracy-Bronson — 2016
This article reports on a project to better understand how educators grapple with externally imposed pressures as they work to change the organizational structure of their schools to implement greater inclusion of their students served by special education.

by Brittany Aronson, Kristin Murphy & Andrew Saultz — 2016
This article draws from the lessons learned from the Atlanta Public Schools cheating scandal that occurred from 2009–2011, with particular attention paid to the unintended consequences of high-stakes accountability practices, especially for students with disabilities.

by Judy Marquez Kiyama, Donna Harris & Amalia Dache-Gerbino — 2016
This article illustrates how oppressive structures shape Latinas’ education experiences, specifically examining how systemic forces position and oppress Latinas, resulting in physical violence, stereotypes, and environmental violence. The Latina participants shared the survival and resistance strategies that they employed, illustrating the importance of further interrogating systems of violence against marginalized women of color in educational settings.

by Sarah Kavanagh — 2016
This article reports findings from a comparative case study that examined how teachers who held strong intentions to support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) students facilitated classroom discourse about LGBTQ identity.

by Srikala Naraian — 2016
To disrupt the stubborn linkage between place and disability, this paper takes up spatial theory to stimulate new understandings of inclusion. Drawing on teacher interview data from ethnographically-oriented studies conducted between 2005 and 2014 in U.S. public schools, it proposes an alternate conceptualization of student learning difference to enable new relations between teacher identity and place, making inclusion a spatially fluid project.

by Scott Seider, Daren Graves, Aaliyah El-Amin, Shelby Clark, Madora Soutter, Jalene Tamerat, Pauline Jennett, Kathryn Gramigna, Jennifer Yung, Megan Kenslea & Sherri Sklarwitz — 2016
The present study considered the role of progressive and no-excuses schooling models in fostering marginalized adolescents’ ability to analyze, navigate, and challenge the social forces and institutions contributing to race and class inequality.

by Becky Huang & Alison Bailey — 2016
The current study focuses on the long-term English language outcomes of a sample of first-generation child immigrants from Asian, specifically Chinese, ethnic backgrounds.

by Ying Huang, Brendan Cantwell & Barrett Taylor — 2016
This study analyzed the 2006 administration of the U.S. National Science Foundation’s Survey of Doctorate Recipients to examine how multiple identities shape the reasons for doctoral recipients to work as postdocs. The analysis found that the interaction of race and foreign-born status were particularly influential in shaping the reason individuals’ chose to work as a postdoc.

by Hua-Yu Cherng — 2016
In this study uses a nationally representative sample of high schoolers to examine patterns of teachers communicating with parents. Even after considering measures of student behavior and academic performance, the author finds that patterns of contact between mathematics and English teachers and parents are consistent with stereotypes that teachers may subscribe to of different racial/ethnic and immigrant groups.

by G. Sue Kasun — 2016
Drawing on three years of critical multi-sited ethnographic research, this article examines the ways of knowing of Mexican-origin transnational families whose primary residence was the Washington, DC area. The author examines the educational implications of their “chained knowing,” or being chained in their knowing to the Mexico–U.S. border and being chained as extended families and communities who cross and intersect with that border.

by J. Luke Wood & Robert Palmer — 2016
This study examines determinants of Black male students’ intent to transfer from a community college to a 4-year university. Using multinomial, multilevel modeling, this study finds that students whose primary goal was to transfer were more likely to be younger, have earned more credits, be non-first-generation, be full-time enrollees, have taken developmental education courses, and be engaged in active and collaborative learning.

by Steven Athanases, Betty Achinstein, Marnie Curry & Rodney Ogawa — 2016
This study extends the "college-going culture" literature by providing a bilevel examination of organizational dimensions of efforts at an urban public charter school to promote Latina/o students' college-going.

by Joseph Nelson — 2016
This study employs a relational teaching framework to examine the learning relationships among teachers and a full cohort of eighth-grade Black boys (N = 27) at a single-sex middle school for boys of color in New York City. In-depth interviews from a critical ethnography conducted at the school-site (during the 2011–2012 academic year) culled boys’ narratives of their teacher-student relationships, in order to illustrate how specific relational teaching strategies supported Black boys’ engagement and learning.

by Chezare Warren, Ty-Ron Douglas & Tyrone Howard — 2016
This article outlines the imperative for strengths-based research to counter deficit perceptions and perspectives of Black males in contemporary discussions of their school achievement in the United States. The importance of young Black men and boys' voice in shaping research agendas, practice, and public policy is argued followed by a brief overview of the papers featured in the special issue “Erasing the Deficits: ‘My Brother’s Keeper’ and Contemporary Perspectives on Black Male School Achievement.”

by Bryan Hotchkins — 2016
This article examines the ways in which African American male students navigate racial microaggressions while attending a culturally diverse high school.

by Kenneth Anderson — 2016
This study examines the relationships between teacher sorting practices, course enrollment patterns, extracurricular activities, and student outcomes for high-achieving Black males in high school.

by Shaun Harper & Christopher Newman — 2016
This article is about Black undergraduate men’s academic adjustment experiences in the first college year. It is based on a study of 219 achievers at 42 colleges and universities across 20 states in the United States.

by Tyrone Howard, Ty-Ron Douglas & Chezare Warren — 2016
This brief presents the most significant recommendations based on a review of key findings from research presented in this special issue. The authors offer what they believe to be the most important considerations of what works for improving Black male school achievement in the domains of research, practice, and policy.

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