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Articles
by Daniel Chazan & Patricio Herbst — 2012
This article introduces two-dimensional video-based animations of fictional classroom interactions as a new kind of video image for representing classrooms. The authors suggest that this addition to the existing repertoire for representing practice can support conversations about tactical and strategic dimensions of the work of teaching in ways that overcome some of the limitations of usual video footage.

by Clifford Hill — 2012
I was invited to give the annual lecture that honors Lawrence Cremin, the historian of American education at Teachers College, Columbia University. To pay tribute to the way in which Cremin used an academic discipline to bring rigor and depth to educational research, I described the way in which I used an academic discipline—linguistics and its varied tools of discourse analysis—to conduct research at the College.

by Lesley Farmer — 2010
As education librarians seek to collaborate with preservice teacher preparation programs, they need to apply informatics principles to optimize the library’s ultimate impact on student achievement. Specifically, education librarians need to examine several levels of information processing systems: student, faculty, program, institution, and government entities. Furthermore, education librarians need to identify the conditions or environments of these information systems because the infrastructure, available resources, and knowledge base all impact student learning.

by Carol Wright — 2010
This article discusses user information behavior though analysis of demographic factors, academic disciplinary characteristics, and the nature of educational research. Understanding elements of user information behavior will inform the development of a system of education informatics.

by Kevin O'Connor & William Penuel — 2010
This essay introduces the issue, Learning Research as a Human Science.

by Martin Packer — 2010
The author suggests that questions in educational research are often about constitution, and that to answer such questions we want a methodology that goes beyond randomized clinical trials and customary qualitative research methods. The author focuses on the contributions of ethnographic fieldwork to research on constitution, though interviews and detailed interaction analysis are also important components.

by Roy Pea & Lee Martin — 2010
In the spirit of deepening our understanding of the social conditions of everyday uses of mathematics, the authors studied 20 diverse families with a middle school child by interviewing family members together at home about their occasions of mathematics use.

by Na'ilah Nasir — 2010
This chapter highlights two important challenges in studying identity in learning contexts from a human science perspective. The first challenge is integrating different perspectives and potential contradictions in accounts of identity. The second is considering both presented and authentic selves in accounts of identity. Both of these challenges stem from a concern with understanding the complexity of identity in learning contexts and with capturing critical nuances in theoretical accounts of identity.

by Leslie Herrenkohl, Lezlie Dewater & Keiko Kawasaki — 2010
This chapter discusses a teacher–researcher partnership oriented toward phronesis, or wise action used to solve practical problems. The three practical problems the authors emphasize are: (1) How did they use their work together to improve teaching and learning? (2) How did they relate to each other in the work? and (3) How did they organize their time and resources to do the work, given their organizational settings and constraints?

by Ben Kirshner — 2010
This chapter examines productive tensions that arise for research and learning when university researchers collaborate with young people to identify, study, and act on relevant social problems. These tensions are explored through a discussion of an intergenerational and interracial youth participatory action research (YPAR) project to study the impact of a high school closure on students. The chapter identifies tensions and dilemmas experienced by participants, including the author, and discusses insights that these generate for doing research in partnership with youth.

by Suzanne De Castell & Jennifer Jenson — 2010
This chapter presents a discussion of obstacles and impediments to and immobilities of a study of queer street-involved youth. The authors’ specific purpose is to identify and consider several specific “blockages” that the study brought to light and to try to say something useful about what these blockages might mean for reconceiving the ways, means, and ends of education and educational research for and with students outside the mainstream.

by William Penuel & Kevin O'Connor — 2010
This concluding chapter revisits the question of why a human sciences approach to research on learning is necessary and summarizes major themes from across the chapters. The conclusion highlights the need for a democratic practice of educational research, the importance of researchers’ making explicit and participating in the imagination and constitution of new social futures, and the expansion of possibilities for understanding, action, and “liminal” participation in practice as potential teloi of learning.

by James Spillane & David Miele — 2007
While much of the recent educational literature has been devoted to explaining how investigators can produce high quality, practical research evidence (e.g., Cook, 2002; Feuer, Towne, & Shavelson, 2002; Shavelson & Towne, 2002; Slavin, 2002; Towne, Wise, & Winters, 2005), little attention has been paid to how evidence can and should be used by teachers and school leaders. Our goal is not to review the empirical literature on teachers’ and school leaders’ use of evidence, but rather to identify the conceptual tools that frame our thinking about this work. Policymakers often work on the assumption that evidence-based practice should be a simple and straightforward process for school practitioners; that is, practitioners need only follow the guidance offered by evidence—typically equated with qualitative research findings and trends in student achievement data—when deciding what they should do and how they should do it. However, this belief is based on several questionable assumptions.

by Cheryl Craig — 2007
Using the “story constellations” version of narrative inquiry, I tell of two schools—Cochrane Academy and Hardy Academy—that evolved from a shared social narrative history and that were given stories of school and stories of reform that had many features in common.

by Tom Stritikus & Ann-Marie Wiese — 2006
The use of ethnographic methods yields a rich account of various factors that play a crucial role in determining how educational policy is implemented.

by Brent Kilbourn — 2006
The generic qualities of a qualitative doctoral dissertation proposal are discussed in this article, including how they relate to the dissertation and to the nature of a research university. Standard parts of a proposal are discussed and reasons given for the role each plays.

by Julie Slayton & Lorena Llosa — 2005
This article argues for the use of qualitative methods in large-scale evaluations. We demonstrate that despite the challenges it presents, the incorporation of qualitative methods significantly improved an evaluation of the Waterford Early Reading Program and translated into findings that were meaningful and useful to stakeholders.

by Angel Kymes — 2005
Although the media education/media literacy debate has yet to find its way into the majority of classrooms across the United States, school libraries and library media specialists are the exception to this general rule. For a decade or more, librarians have been encouraging students to use multiple media to locate and utilize information. And a prerequisite for effective use is evaluation, based on issues such as timeliness, authority, and relevance. Whether the information is presented in traditional print texts, in graphic novels, in video, on websites, or through other media, library media specialists have assumed the responsibility of teaching students to select and use the items most relevant to their immediate need. Now, as the call for a more critical approach to literacy has surfaced in education, the library media specialist is in a position to continue assisting students in utilizing and processing information from a variety of media.

by Paul Shaker & Elizabeth Heilman — 2004
An increasingly broad array of cultural and institutional forces are at work creating a new “common sense” of education that maligns or manipulates the corpus of educational research and attacks promising practices and reforms. In addition, a new type of education scholarship has emerged that is delivered in alternative ways, funded through unorthodox sources, motivated by nonacademic purposes, and supported through direct access to media and political organizations, including the federal government. This article examines the details of the new commonsense policy and rhetoric and considers what is being lost and what educators need to do to restore to public education its position of civic and moral leadership in our society.

by Barbara Schneider — 2004
This article argues for the importance of replication and data sharing in educational research. Relying on standards set in other disciplines, such as sociology, the paper discusses how professional associations can help to create norms and incentives for data sharing and data archiving.

by Marilyn Dabady — 2003
This special section of Teachers College Record is comprised of papers presented at the National Research Council Workshop on Measuring Racial Disparities and Discrimination in Elementary and Secondary Education.

by Roslyn Mickelson — 2003
In this article I seek to answer the question, "When are racial disparities in education the result of racial discrimination?" To answer it I synthesize the social science research on racially correlated disparities in education.

by Harry Holzer & Jens Ludwig — 2003
This paper reviews the methodologies most frequently used by social scientists when measuring discrimination in housing and labor markets and assesses their potential usefulness for analyzing discrimination in education.

by Cynthia Ballenger & Ann Rosebery — 2003
Many questions remain among both teachers and researchers about the research methods used in teacher research, about how theory is used, about what people are doing when they do it, about the values behind it, and about how it can be best used.

by Brian Rowan, Richard Correnti & Robert Miller — 2002
This papers considers concerptual and methodological issues that arise in large-scale survey research on teaching and uses data from Prospects to draw some substantive conclusions about the overall magnitude and sources of teachers' effects on student achievement in elementary schools.

by Lisa Petrides & Susan Guiney — 2002
While there has been a great deal of recognition in the business world that information and knowledge management can be vital tools in organizations, it is only recently that educational administrators have begun to look at how they might use information systems to assist in creating effective learning environments. In the business research environment, the evolution from data to information and from information to knowledge plays a leading role in shaping how organizations develop strategies and plans for the future. Using examples from schools, this paper illustrates how knowledge management can enable schools to examine the plethora of data they collect, and how an ecological framework can be used to transform these data into meaningful information.

by Ray McDermott — 2001
This paper offers an analysis of Mead’s contributions and contradictions in two sections, one on her ethnography, the other on her legacy applied to the problems of education in the contemporary United States, particularly her rarely noticed contributions to a theory of learning.

by Frances Kochan & Carol Mullen — 2001
Fairness and justice in collaborative authorship practice.

by Brent Kilbourn — 2001
A detailed analysis of a sample first paragraph of a thesis

by Gary Natriello — 2000

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Book Reviews
by Dannielle Joy Davis, Rachelle J. Brunn-Bevel, & James L. Olive
reviwed by Tabitha Dell'Angelo — 2017

by Rebecca J. Morris
reviwed by Jose Montelongo — 2016

by Nancy Mack
reviwed by Timothy Wells & Mirka Koro-Ljungberg — 2016

by Noriyuki Inoue
reviwed by Marilee Bresciani — 2016

by Tamara Halle, Allison Metz, Ivelisse Martinez-Beck (Eds.)
reviwed by Barbara Spector — 2016

by John Smyth, Barry Down, Peter McInerney, Robert Hattam
reviwed by Melanie Brooks — 2015

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reviwed by Jeremy Godwin & Sherick Hughes — 2015

by Lucinda Carspecken, Phil Francis Carspecken, & Barbara Dennis (Eds.)
reviwed by Derek Hutchinson & Mary Lynn Hamilton — 2015

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Resources
  • The Deep Web: Surfacing Hidden Value
    An examination of the wealth of information that is available only on dynamically created Web sites, those that don't exist except as relational databases until someone seeks information from them.
  • Portal: Libraries and the Academy
    A journal that presents research findings and provides regular coverage of issues in technology, publishing, and periodicals, Portal is written by librarians for librarians. Peer-reviewed articles address subjects such as library administration, information technology, and information policy. The journal examines the role of libraries in meeting institutional missions, explores how technology affects librarianship and scholarship, and conveys this research to academic librarians in a timely manner.
  • University of Wisconsin Writing Center
    The Writing Center at Madison has helped literally tens of thousands of University of Wisconsin students, both undergraduate and graduate, learn more about writing and has helped them successfully complete course papers, theses, dissertations, and articles for publication--in all sorts of academic disciplines.
  • Declaring Independence: Returning Scientific Publishing to Scientists
    A discussion of SPARC's "Declaring Independence" project and the resulting manifesto for scientists who are tired of rising journal prices.
  • Information Technology and Libraries
    Information Technology and Libraries is a refereed journal published quarterly by the Library and Information Technology Association, a division of the American Library Association.
  • Urban Libraries Council
    The Urban Libraries Council (ULC) is an association of large public libraries and corporations which serve them, organized to solve common problems, better understand new opportunities and conduct applied research which improves professional practice.
  • Reflecting on Our Future
    This paper considers the future of libraries and ponders changes in technology, philosophy, the way things get done.
  • School Library Journal
    School Library Journal, the print magazine, and now, School Library Journal Online, the web site, serve librarians who work with young people in school and public libraries. The two publications give librarians indispensable information needed to manage libraries, from creating high-quality collections to understanding how technology can assist (or hinder) learning.
  • Special Libraries Association
    Headquartered in Washington, D.C., the Special Libraries Association (SLA) is the international association representing the interests of thousands of information professionals in sixty countries.
  • Digital Object Library Products
  • Ariadne
    Ariadne magazine is targeted principally at information science professionals in academia, and also to interested lay people both in and beyond the Higher Education community. Its main geographic focus is the UK, but it is widely read in the US and worldwide.
  • Library and Information Technology Association
    LITA educates, serves, and reaches out to its members, other ALA members and divisions, and the entire library and information community through its publications, programs, and other activities designed to promote, develop, and aid in the implementation of library and information technology.
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