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Which Piper to Pay? When Technology-Enabled Personalization and Accountability Regimes Collide


by Douglas D. Ready, Iris Daruwala & Shani Bretas September 05, 2018

In this commentary, authors situate the relatively new wave of technology-enabled personalized learning platforms within the broader context of institutional accountability.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: September 05, 2018
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 22494, Date Accessed: 12/18/2018 12:26:54 PM

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About the Author
  • Douglas D. Ready
    Teachers College Columbia University
    E-mail Author
    DOUGLAS D. READY is an Associate Professor of Education and Public Policy, and the Director of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE-TC), at Teachers College Columbia University. His research explores the links between education policy, social policy, and educational equity, with a particular focus on how contemporary policies and programs moderate or exacerbate socio-demographic disparities in cognitive development.
  • Iris Daruwala
    Teachers College Columbia University
    E-mail Author
    SHANI BRETAS is a Ph.D. student in Education Policy at Teachers College, Columbia University, and a Researcher at the Consortium for Policy Research in Education, where she conducts mixed-methods evaluations of educational policies and programs that seek to transform the technical core of teaching and learning. Her other interests include the sociological conditions that create educational inequality, and the design and implementation of efforts aimed at increasing equity and access.
  • Shani Bretas
    Teachers College Columbia University
    E-mail Author
    IRIS DARUWALA is a Ph.D. candidate in Sociology and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, and a Researcher at the Consortium for Policy Research in Education. Her research interests include cross-sector collaboration, school segregation, and the organizational sociology of education systems. Prior to joining CPRE, she worked on large-scale, mixed methods policy and program evaluations at the American Institutes for Research (AIR).
 
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