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Teaching U.S. History Thematically: Document-Based Lessons for the Secondary Classroom


reviewed by Gregory Samuels & Amy Samuels — April 12, 2018

coverTitle: Teaching U.S. History Thematically: Document-Based Lessons for the Secondary Classroom
Author(s): Rosalie Metro
Publisher: Teachers College Press, New York
ISBN: 080775868X, Pages: 224, Year: 2017
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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: April 12, 2018
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 22328, Date Accessed: 12/16/2018 10:28:03 AM

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About the Author
  • Gregory Samuels
    University of Montevallo
    E-mail Author
    GREGORY SAMUELS is an assistant professor of secondary education at the University of Montevallo in Alabama. In addition to teaching courses on classroom management, diversity, literacy, and social justice, he supervises interns in an alternative secondary education master’s program. His research interests include pedagogical applications in the social studies, teaching and learning for social justice, facilitation of critical pedagogy, and working to include marginalized voices in the curriculum. His recent publications include "Untold Stories: Using Common Core State Standards to Give Voice to Japanese Americans" (The Councilor: A Journal of the Social Studies, 2017), "Un-silencing Voices: Investigating Human Rights Violations Regarding Violence Against African American Males" (Social Studies Education Review, 2017), and "Uncovering Lost Voices: African American Involvement in the Liberation of Jews During the Holocaust" (in Mending Walls: Historical, Socio-Political, Economic, and Geographical Perspectives, 2017, edited by Diem and Berson). Current projects include a qualitative study titled “Educators’ Perceptions of Advocating for Racially Just Schools,” designed to examine educators’ perceptions of how race and racism impact teaching, learning, access, and opportunities, as well as their perceptions of how to advocate for racially just schools.
  • Amy Samuels
    University of Montevallo
    E-mail Author
    AMY SAMUELS is an assistant professor of leadership at the University of Montevallo in Alabama. She teaches courses on action research, curriculum, equity, mentoring, professional development, restorative leadership, and social justice in both the Instructional Leadership and Teacher Leadership programs. Her research interests include examining how race and economic status influence and shape educational and social contexts, as well as culturally and ethnically responsive educational practice. Her recent publications include "Exploring Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: Teachers’ Perspectives of Fostering Equitable and Inclusive Classrooms" (The SRATE Journal, 2018), "The Dialogue of Denial: Perpetuating Racism through Thoughtful Inaction" (Understanding and Dismantling Privilege, 2017), and "Un-silencing Voices: Investigating Human Rights Violations Regarding Violence against African American Males" (Social Studies Education Review, 2017). Current projects include a qualitative study titled “Educators’ Perceptions of Advocating for Racially Just Schools,” designed to examine educators’ perceptions of how race and racism impact teaching, learning, access, and opportunities, as well as their perceptions of how to advocate for racially just schools.
 
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