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Mapping Culturally Relevant Pedagogy into Teacher Education Programs: A Critical Framework


by Ayana Allen, Stephen D. Hancock, Chance W. Lewis & Tehia Starker-Glass — 2017

Background/Context: Teacher education programs are charged with the daunting task of preparing the next generation of teachers. However, the extant literature has documented that teacher education programs have struggled to effectively arm teacher candidates with effective pedagogies to meet the needs of our increasingly diverse student population. Culturally relevant pedagogy (CRP) is a social justice framework posited to support academic achievement, cultural competence, and critical consciousness for all learners. To this end, this article examines the integration of CRP into teacher education programs.

Purpose: In this article, we discuss CRP and interrogate teacher education programs in the critical areas of governance and accountability, policies and programs, curriculum and instruction, and teacher educators. Furthermore, this article presents a conceptual framework for the integration of CRP into teacher education programs.

Research Design: This article is a conceptual paper that builds upon the hallmarks of CRP, which are rooted in a critical race paradigm that centers on exposing and challenging racial policies that maintain the status quo in teacher education programs. We present a critical framework to support the mapping of CRP into teacher education programs through critical reflection, social justice action, and critical questioning.

Conclusion/Recommendations: A teacher preparation program that does not critically interrogate race, power, and privilege in the context of schools does not maintain a social justice mission and consequently does not meet the tenets of CRP. A critical examination of race and other sociocultural concepts that disenfranchise K–12 students in schools must be an integral and reflective practice for teacher candidates. Requiring teacher candidates to gain skills in critical reflection and critical consciousness in an effort to deconstruct the existing social order is imperative to support culturally relevant pedagogy in teacher education curriculum.



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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 119 Number 1, 2017, p. 1-26
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 21746, Date Accessed: 6/27/2017 11:34:29 AM

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About the Author
  • Ayana Allen
    Drexel University
    E-mail Author
    AYANA ALLEN is an Assistant Professor of Urban Education in the department of Policy, Organization, and Leadership at Drexel University. Her research interests include examining issues of access, equity, and social justice in urban schools and communities. She is engaged in youth participatory action research (YPAR) that builds upon a community cultural wealth framework and the positive identity development of historically marginalized children. She is co-editor of Autoethnography as a Lighthouse: Illuminating Race, Research, and the Politics of Schooling as well as recently published articles in Equity and Excellence in Education and The Education Law & Policy Review.
  • Stephen Hancock
    University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    E-mail Author
    STEPHEN D. HANCOCK is an Associate Professor of Multicultural Education in the Department of Reading and Elementary Education at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, where he also serves as the Assistant Director of the Urban Education Collaborative. He is an International Visiting Professor at the Pedagogische Hocshule in Ludwigsburg, Germany, where he teaches Diversity and Globalization in Education. His research interests support academic relationships in urban school context, reading practices and strategies for urban students, ethnographic and autoethnographic methodologies, and White teacher effectiveness in multicultural spaces. He is co-editor of Autoethnography as a Lighthouse: Illuminating Race, Research, and the Politics of Schooling and White Women’s Work: Examining the Intersectionality of Teaching, Identity, and Race. In addition, he has published in journals including the Harvard Education Review.
  • Chance Lewis
    University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    E-mail Author
    CHANCE W. LEWIS is the Carol Grotnes Belk Distinguished Professor of Urban Education and Director of The Urban Education Collaborative at UNC Charlotte. His research interests are centered on increasing academic opportunities for African American students and the recruitment and retention of African American teachers. Dr. Lewis is the co-editor of the national best-selling book, Reaching the Mountaintop of the Academy: Personal Narratives, Advice and Strategies from Black Distinguished and Endowed Professors (Information Age, 2015) and African American Male Students in PK–12 Settings: Information Research, Policy and Practice (Emerald, 2014).
  • Tehia Starker-Glass
    University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    E-mail Author
    TEHIA STARKER-GLASS is an Associate Professor of Elementary Education and Educational Psychology in the department of Reading and Elementary Education at UNC Charlotte. Her research interests include preparing preservice and inservice teachers’ culturally responsive teaching self-efficacy, examining motivational factors that influence teachers’ behavior towards culturally diverse students, culturally responsive classroom management, the impact of teacher education at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCU’s), and instructional design. She is co-author of “The Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Self-Efficacy Scale Development and Initial Validation,” which was recently published in Urban Education.
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