Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements

A Co-Construction Perspective on Organizational Change and Educational Reform


by Hugh Mehan, Lea Hubbard & Amanda Datnow — 2010

This chapter explains and expands on the co-construction perspective using examples from studies the authors have conducted on educational reform. They begin by contrasting the technical-rational and co-construction perspectives on school reform. They then describe how their formulation of co-construction takes into account issues of power and authority. The authors then elaborate on the perspective by presenting different cases of co-construction of reforms by actors at different levels of the educational system.


To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase A Co-Construction Perspective on Organizational Change and Educational Reform
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $25 is available for a limited time.
$25
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$210


This article originally appeared as NSSE Yearbook Vol 109. No. 1.


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 112 Number 13, 2010, p. 98-112
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 18404, Date Accessed: 5/25/2017 2:21:07 PM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
Article Tools
Related Articles

Related Discussion
 
Post a Comment | Read All

About the Author
  • Hugh Mehan
    University of California, San Diego
    HUGH MEHAN is professor of sociology and director of the Center for Research on Educational Equity, Access and Teaching Excellence (CREATE) at UC San Diego, appointments that link his commitments to research and practice. He has studied classroom organization, educational testing, and tracking and detracking. Recent publications include Reform as Learning (with Mary Kay Stein and Lea Hubbard), “Engaging the Sociological Imagination” (2008 Anthropology and Education Quarterly), and “A Sociological Perspective on Opportunity to Learn and Assessment” (2009).
  • Lea Hubbard
    University of San Diego
    E-mail Author
    LEA HUBBARD is a professor in the School of Leadership and Education Sciences at the University of San Diego. Her work focuses on educational reform and district leadership as well as educational inequities as they exist across ethnicity, class, and gender. Her recent publications include Reform as Learning: When School Reform Collided With School Culture and Community Politics in San Diego (2006, Routledge, with Hugh Mehan and Mary Kay Stein), “Charter Schools: Learning From the Past, Planning for the Future” (2009, Journal of Educational Change with Rucheeta Kulkarni), and “Research to Practice: The Case of Boston Public Schools, Education Matters and Boston Plan for Excellence” (2010, Rowman and Littlefield).
  • Amanda Datnow
    University of California, San Diego
    E-mail Author
    AMANDA DATNOW is professor and director of the education studies program at the University of California, San Diego. Her research focuses on the politics and policies of school reform, particularly with regard to the professional lives of educators and issues of equity. Her recent publications include “Co-constructing Distributed Leadership: District and School Connections in Data-Driven Decision Making” (School Leadership and Management, 2009) and “Conceptualizing Policy Implementation: Large-Scale Reform in an Era of Complexity” (AERA Handbook on Education Policy Research, 2009).
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS