Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements

A History of Informal, Out-of-School Education


by Ryan W. Coughlan, Alan R. Sadovnik & Susan F. Semel — 2014

Informal, out-of-school education encompasses a variety of programs existing alongside the founding and growth of public schools. This chapter explores the history of the institutionalization of informal, out-of-school education, including programs offered by religious institutions, social service organizations, cultural institutions, special interest organizations, the media and universities. Access to these programs is neither uniformly offered nor guaranteed, a situation that potentially exacerbates existent inequities.


To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase A History of Informal, Out-of-School Education
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $25 is available for a limited time.
$25
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$210


This article originally appeared as NSSE Yearbook Vol 113. No. 2.


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 116 Number 14, 2014, p. 359-382
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 18297, Date Accessed: 7/21/2017 10:45:13 AM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
Article Tools
Related Articles

Related Discussion
 
Post a Comment | Read All

About the Author
  • Ryan Coughlan
    Rutgers University
    E-mail Author
    RYAN W. COUGHLAN is completing his doctoral work in Educational Policy in Urban Systems at Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey as a Presidential Fellow. He received his AB from Harvard University and his MA in secondary education at the City College of New York. Previously, Ryan taught environmental science at Validus Preparatory Academy, a small public high school in the Bronx. His research interests include the sociology of education, systems of informal education, community schools, and teacher retention.
  • Alan R. Sadovnik
    Rutgers University
    E-mail Author
    ALAN R. SADOVNIK is Board of Governors Distinguished Service Professor of Education, Sociology and Public Administration and Affairs at Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey, where he is the Co-Director of the Institute on Educational Law and Policy and the Newark Schools Research Collaborative, and Coordinator of the Educational Policy track of the PhD Program in Urban Systems. He received his BA in sociology from Queens College of the City University of New York and MA and PhD in sociology from New York University. Among his publications are Exploring Education: An Introduction to the Foundations of Education (1994, 2001, 2006, 2013) and Sociology of Education: A Critical Reader (2007, 2010). His research interests include the sociology of education, urban educational reform and improvement, and the history of progressive education.
  • Susan F. Semel
    City College of New York
    E-mail Author
    SUSAN F. SEMEL is Chair of the Department of Secondary Education and Professor of Education at the City College of New York, as well as Professor of Urban Education at the CUNY Graduate Center. Among her publications are The Dalton School: The Transformation of a Progressive School (1992); Exploring Education: An Introduction to the Foundations of Education (1994, 2001, 2006, 2013); Foundations of Education: The Essential Texts (2010); “Schools of Tomorrow,” Schools of Today: What Happened to Progressive Education (1999).
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS