Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements

An Examination of Teachersí Perceptions of Principal Support for Change and Teachersí Collaboration and Communication Around Literacy Instruction in Reading First Schools


by Dan Berebitsky, Roger D. Goddard & Joanne F. Carlisle ó 2014

Background/Context: Little research has directly examined whether principal leadership can increase the degree to which teachers work together regularly in focused ways around content. Prior research has shown that reform efforts seeking to alter the process of teaching can be successful if teachers collaborate to build capacity and improve instruction. Furthermore, the research literature has highlighted supportive principal leadership as a key component of teachersí perception of an effective collaborative change process.

Purpose: This study examines the empirical link between teachersí perceptions of principal support for change and teachersí reports of the degree of collaboration and communication with one another around literacy.

Setting: The data for this study was collected in all 165 Reading First schools in Michigan in the 2006-2007 school year.

Subjects: Survey data was collected from 1,738 teachers across all schools.

Research Design: Data for this study was collected as part of the evaluation of Reading First in Michigan. Literacy teachers in kindergarten through third grade completed surveys at three points throughout the school year (fall, winter, and spring). These surveys contained questions about principal support for change and collaboration and communication around literacy.

Data Collection and Analysis: The primary analytic method employed in this study was multilevel modeling. Factor analysis and full information maximum likelihood estimation were also used.

Findings/Results: The measure of principal support for change was a significant positive predictor of teachersí assessment of the degree of regular collaboration and communication around reading instruction; a one standard deviation increase in teachersí reports of principal support for change was associated with a 0.202 standard deviation increase in teachersí assessment of the degree of collaboration and communication around literacy when controlling for the other variables in the model.

Conclusions/Recommendations: This paper demonstrates that the degree to which teachers report collaboration and communication around literacy in Reading First schools is significantly related to their perceptions of principal support for change. If policymakers expect teachers to collaborate around issues of instruction, then they need to consider the principalís role in supporting change in the school by encouraging teachers to improve their instruction and take the risks associated with innovation. In sum, the results of this study are important for educators, as the role of the principal is potentially critical for positive changes in teacher collaboration and, consequently, student achievement in high-poverty schools.



To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase An Examination of Teachersí Perceptions of Principal Support for Change and Teachersí Collaboration and Communication Around Literacy Instruction in Reading First Schools
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $20 is available for a limited time.
$20
Visitor
Choose this to join the mailing list or add an announcement.
$0
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$145


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 116 Number 4, 2014, p. -
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 17401, Date Accessed: 7/24/2014 2:25:47 AM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
Article Tools
Related Articles

Related Discussion
 
Post a Comment | Read All

About the Author
  • Dan Berebitsky
    Southern Methodist University
    E-mail Author
    DAN BEREBITSKY is an Assistant Professor in the Educational Policy and Leadership department in the Simmons School of Education and Human Development at Southern Methodist University. His research focuses on the connections between school culture and instructional leadership. Recent research has appeared in Elementary School Journal, Scientific Studies of Reading, and Educational Administration Quarterly. Berebitsky is a former IES Postdoctoral Research Fellow, and in 2010, he was awarded the William J. Davis Award by UCEA for most outstanding article appearing in EAQ, with his coauthors, Roger D. Goddard and Serena Salloum.
  • Roger Goddard
    McREL
    ROGER D. GODDARD is a Senior Fellow at Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL). He is also currently Co-Principal Investigator of a randomized control trial evaluating the causal impact of McRELís Balanced Leadership program for school leaders sponsored by IES and Associate Editor for Educational Administration Quarterly. His research focuses on the social psychology of school organization and leadership with a particular emphasis on the conceptualization, measurement, sources, and impacts of efficacy beliefs. A former National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Post-doctoral Fellow, his most recent research has appeared in the Elementary School Journal, Educational Researcher, and Educational Administration Quarterly.
  • Joanne Carlisle
    University of Michigan
    E-mail Author
    JOANNE F. CARLISLE is Professor Emerita in the School of Education, University of Michigan. Her research interests focus on the relation of language and literacy development with a special interest in children for whom language and literacy acquisition presents unusual challenges. Recently, her research projects have focused on effective teaching of reading in the early elementary years, including a study of models of professional development for teachers of reading, a study of assessment of teachersí knowledge about reading, and development of an interactive Web-based program to provide opportunities for teachers to gain experience analyzing the effectiveness of early reading instruction, called Case Studies in Reading Lessons. She was responsible for the evaluation of the Reading First program in Michigan.
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS