Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements

The Privacy Conundrum, Public Education, and the Search for an Elusive Middle Ground


by Stuart Biegel ó December 01, 2010

Acknowledging the growing acceptability of a diminishing level of privacy protection in the U.S., this commentary examines three case studies that together reflect the challenges faced by members of the education community in this context: the 2007 massacre perpetrated by 23-year-old Seung-Hui Cho at Virginia Tech, the U.S. Supreme Courtís 2009 decision in the strip search of 13-year-old Arizona student Savana Redding, and the 2010 suicide of 18-year-old Rutgers student Tyler Clementi. Although the three events may appear very different from each other at first glance, an analysis of what transpired reveals many parallels and offers opportunities for education leaders to begin the process of regaining the elusive middle ground in this area.


To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase The Privacy Conundrum, Public Education, and the Search for an Elusive Middle Ground
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $25 is available for a limited time.
$25
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$210


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: December 01, 2010
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 16251, Date Accessed: 4/26/2017 11:41:51 AM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS