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Prioritizing Urban Children, Teachers, and Schools Through Professional Development Schools


reviewed by Barbara Beyerbach July 16, 2009

coverTitle: Prioritizing Urban Children, Teachers, and Schools Through Professional Development Schools
Author(s): Pia Lindquist Wong and Ronald David Glass (eds.)
Publisher: State University of New York Press, Albany
ISBN: 1438425937, Pages: 288, Year: 2009
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Prioritizing Urban Children, Teachers, and Schools Through Professional Development Schools, edited by Wong and Glass, makes an important contribution to the literature on how to build partnerships in urban (and other) settings that disrupt, challenge, and transform oppressive social structures. The focus is squarely on improving education and life chances for low-income, racially, culturally, and linguistically diverse students through engaging preservice and practicing teachers and their communities in culturally relevant educational partnerships. The editors weave many voices throughout the book, primarily those of university based educators and some K-12 teachers, reporting on the evolution of the Equity Network of about a dozen professional development schools (PDS) in the greater Sacramento metropolitan area in partnership with a group of faculty at California State University Sacramento’s College of Education. The book is divided into three sections. The authors of the first section ground their work in a broad political context focused on making... (preview truncated at 150 words.)


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: July 16, 2009
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 15720, Date Accessed: 12/15/2017 2:58:54 PM

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About the Author
  • Barbara Beyerbach
    SUNY Oswego
    E-mail Author
    DR. BARBARA BEYERBACH is a professor of education in the department of Curriculum and Instruction, teaching Culturally Relevant Teaching and Co-directing Project SMART (Student-Centered, Multicultural, Active, Real-World Teaching), a professional development project to transform educational institutions K-16 through social justice pedagogy. Collaborating with colleagues across divisions of the University, with community partners, with schools from Oswego County, Syracuse City School District, the Onondaga Nation, New York City, and most recently with School Inspectors from Benin West Africa, Project SMART has grown from an elementary teacher inquiry science- focused professional development initiative to a multifaceted, multi subject K-16 urban rural network of teacher leaders who are actively engaged in school reform. SMART has received funding from NCLB TLQP, NSF, DDE Eisenhower Title II, and a variety of business and industry partners. Along with co-director Burrell, Beyerbach serves on the board of the national GESA (Generating Expectations for Student Achievement) Educational Alliance as Senior Research Associate. She collaborates with the NYS K-16 Alliance in supporting the dissemination of this award winning equity pedagogy program throughout schools in NYS and beyond, and has conducted evaluation studies on the impact of GESA.
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