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The Conspiracy of the Good: Civil Rights and the Struggle for Community in Two American Cities, 1875-2000


reviewed by Ronald E. Butchart — February 19, 2007

coverTitle: The Conspiracy of the Good: Civil Rights and the Struggle for Community in Two American Cities, 1875-2000
Author(s): Michael E. James
Publisher: Peter Lang Publishing, New York
ISBN: 0820457795 , Pages: 408, Year: 2005
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Pasadena, California—home of the fabled Rose Bowl Parade and Cal Tech, one of America’s wealthiest cities through much of the twentieth century, and the first city west of the Rocky Mountains to experience court-ordered desegregation. Charlottesville, Virginia—home of Thomas Jefferson and his University of Virginia, long segregated by race and still marked by racial and class divisions, yet, ironically, named a decade ago by Reader’s Digest as one of the country’s ten best places to raise a family. Except for Pasadena’s annual New Year’s Day festivities of football and marching bands, neither city has figured prominently in national affairs. Neither of them has a reputation for violent racial incidents like those associated with Little Rock or Birmingham, Detroit or Boston. At the same time, neither has made a committed effort to become communities that authentically reach across class and race lines. Reasons enough, perhaps, for a comparative history. Michael E. James... (preview truncated at 150 words.)


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: February 19, 2007
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 13438, Date Accessed: 10/22/2017 9:47:40 AM

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About the Author
  • Ronald Butchart
    University of Georgia
    E-mail Author
    RONALD E. BUTCHART is Professor of History of Education at the University of Georgia. His most recent publication (2007) is "Remapping Racial Boundaries: Teachers as Border Police and Boundary Transgressors in Post-Emancipation Black Education, USA, 1861-1876," in Paedagogica Historica. In addition to extensive scholarship on nineteenth century African American education, he has also written on the history and political economy of school discipline, and is the author of a volume on historical methods, Local Schools: Exploring their History. He is currently working on a large-scale study of the students, schools, curriculum, and teachers in post-slavery southern black education.
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