Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements

Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today’s Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter


reviewed by Anthony Cocciolo — 2006

coverTitle: Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today’s Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter
Author(s): Steven Johnson
Publisher: Riverhead Books, New York
ISBN: 1573223077, Pages: 238, Year: 2005
Search for book at Amazon.com

I was piping WNYC public radio into my office on an early morning in May, funneling down my Starbucks coffee and situating myself for the long day ahead.  In the background, Brian Lehrer--the comforting radio voice synonymous with my daily ritual--was conversing with a brisk sounding gentleman.  This chatty gentleman had written a book with an intriguing but troubling premise: today’s popular culture is actually making us smarter!  Realizing the book’s author was Steven Johnson, who had written, Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software, I was compelled to pick up a copy.   Although no stranger to modern media (I have admittedly spent more than one evening watching The Apprentice.), I have remained skeptical of its influences.  Perhaps the horrors of flipping through channels and accidentally landing on Fear Factor predisposed me to hesitation.  Or conceivably the ghosts of Adorno and Marcuse were unduly influencing me, lightly... (preview truncated at 150 words.)


To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today’s Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $25 is available for a limited time.
$25
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$210


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 108 Number 1, 2006, p. 187-190
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 12076, Date Accessed: 10/19/2017 11:13:05 PM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
Article Tools
Related Articles

Related Discussion
 
Post a Comment | Read All

About the Author
  • Anthony Cocciolo
    Teachers College, Columbia University
    E-mail Author
    ANTHONY COCCIOLO is a technologist and doctoral student in the Communication and Education program at Teachers College, Columbia University. His research interests basically revolve around the possibilities for subjective, educative development within digitally fabricated environments. Currently, he is working to design and develop social approaches to digital environments and looking at the cognitive, affective and educational implications. For more information on Anthony’s work, please refer to his webpage at http://anthony.thinkingprojects.org.
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS