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Tenure on Trial: Case Studies of Change in Faculty Employment Policies


reviewed by C. Dean Campbell & William G. Tierney — 2003

coverTitle: Tenure on Trial: Case Studies of Change in Faculty Employment Policies
Author(s): William T. Mallon
Publisher: Routledge/Falmer, New York
ISBN: 041593219X, Pages: 208, Year: 2001
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William T. Mallon observes in his introductory chapter that many statements in the literature about tenure policy change are not founded in research, but in conjecture (p. 43).  He then undertakes a workmanlike study of four institutions that includes how each institution endured change and what cultural factors instigated change.  In the opening chapters, Mallon proposes that institutions have adopted tenure in a collegial fashion, wherein deliberation occurs collaboratively across the institution.  He proposes that institutions, however, currently tend to eliminate tenure in a top-down fashion, whereby the president, trustees, and administration by-pass faculty governance and approval.  Mallon predicts that the popular loosely coupled theory of organizational change applies only to institutions that adopt tenure and not to those that eliminated it.    The book is based upon Mallon’s dissertation done while he was a graduate student at Harvard University.  Of consequence, the chapters tend to move through well-worn territory.  He points out, for example, that the origin of American tenure, Lehrfreiheit, the freedom for faculty to conduct research and teach without... (preview truncated at 150 words.)


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 105 Number 1, 2003, p. 67-70
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 10907, Date Accessed: 3/23/2017 6:27:13 AM

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About the Author
  • C. Campbell
    University of Southern California
    E-mail Author
    C. Dean Campbell is a research assistant at the Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis (CHEPA) at the University of Southern California. His research interests are in higher education administration, governance, and organizational performance. Within CHEPA, Campbell is currently working with William Tierney on a project entitled, "Enhancing Diversity: Graduate Student Socialization and Preparing Future Faculty".
  • William Tierney
    University of Southern California
    E-mail Author
    William Tierney is Director of the Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis at the University of Southern California. His research interests pertain to faculty productivity, decision-making, and issues of equity. His books include: The Responsive University: Restructuring for High Performance (1998); Official Encouragement, Institutional Discouragement: Minorities in Academe - The Native American Experience (1992); and Building Communities of Difference: Higher Education in the 21st Century (1993). He teaches graduate courses on curricular theory, administration, policy, organizational behavior, and qualitative methodology.
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