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Physical Activities for Improving Children’s Learning and Behavior


reviewed by Jason H. Mateika & Andrew M. Gordon — 2001

coverTitle: Physical Activities for Improving Children’s Learning and Behavior
Author(s): Billye Ann Cheatum, Allison A. Hammond
Publisher: Human Kinetics , Champaign
ISBN: 0880118741, Pages: 341, Year: 2000
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Most elementary, middle school and high school teachers completing graduate degrees in education are not required to enroll in an elementary course in neuroscience despite the availability of applicable courses at the institutions in which they are enrolled. As a result, most teachers are not aware of the impact that developmental neuroscience has on learning and behavior in the classroom. This lack of awareness also extends to many parents who might be faced with a child displaying signs of learning and behavior problems. Consequently, many of the underlying causes for these problems in the home and classroom are not detected at an early stage, although they may be most evident in these settings. Furthermore, because of this lack of insight, once a diagnosis is determined parents and teachers may be passive participants in the treatment process even though they could potentially provide valuable insights that might enhance the course of treatment. Although information on this subject may presently be available, there may be a lack of... (preview truncated at 150 words.)


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 103 Number 1, 2001, p. 29-32
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 10576, Date Accessed: 12/18/2017 12:20:21 AM

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About the Author
  • Jason Mateika
    Teachers College, Columbia University
    E-mail Author
    Jason H. Mateika is assistant professor of applied physiology at Teachers College, Columbia University. His research focuses on the relationship between sleep patterns and school performance. Recent publications include Adaptive and dynamic interactions between the respiratory and motor systems during object manipulation (with A.M. Gordon) in Brain Research (1999) and Continuous measurements of the baroreflex response during sleep in non-apneic snoring individuals (with N. Kavey and G. Mitru) in Sleep (1999).
  • Andrew Gordon
    Teachers College, Columbia University
    Andrew M. Gordon is associate professor of movement science and education at Teachers College, Columbia University. His work focuses on the biological basis of hand impairments in populations with movement disorders. He has developed a rehabilitative approach for children with cerebral palsy that aims to increase the use and efficiency of the affected extremity and promote greater independence in activities of daily living. Recent publications include Impaired force coordination during object release in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (with A.C. Eliasson) in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology (2000) and Relation between clinical measures and fine manipulative control in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology (1999).
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