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The Self-Conscious Mind and the Meaning and Mystery of Personal Existence


by John C. Eccles 1981

Human beings must realize the great unknowns in the material makeup and operation of the brain, in the relationship of brain to mind, in the creative imagination, and in the uniqueness of the psyche. The essential feature of the dualist-interaction theory is that mind and body are independent entities which somehow interact. (Source: ERIC)


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 82 Number 3, 1981, p. 403-426
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 995, Date Accessed: 10/19/2017 7:41:14 PM

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About the Author
  • John Eccles
    Contra, Switzerland
    Sir John Carew Eccles is distinguished Emeritus Professor at the State University of New York in Buffalo. A research neurophysiologist, he received the Nobel prize for medicine in 1963. He has been a distinguished lecturer and research fellow at many universities around the world and was the Gifford lecturer at Edinburgh University in 1977 and 1978. Among his many publications are included most recently, Facing Reality: Philosophical Adventures of a Brain Scientist, Understanding the Brain, Physiology of Synapses, and The Self and Its Brain co-authored with Karl Popper, and the Gifford Lectures, The Human Mystery and The Human Psyche.
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