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The Pragmatist as Pacifist: John Dewey's Views on Peace Education


by Charles F. Howlett 1982

Dewey's writings defined the role of educators in society and their ability to influence world peace, international cooperation, the meaning of patriotism, and the role of the social sciences in understanding other cultures. Dewey perceived the job of the educator as teaching basic values of peace and nonviolence as correct social behavior. (Source: ERIC)


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 83 Number 3, 1982, p. 435-451
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 735, Date Accessed: 10/22/2017 10:34:22 PM

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About the Author
  • Charles Howlett
    Teachers College, Columbia University
    CHARLES F. HOWLETT teaches social studies at Amityville Memorial High School. He received his PH. D. in 1974 from the State University of New York at Albany. He is the author of Troubled Philosophers (1977). He has just completed a book length manuscript entitled More Than Business Unionism: Brookwood Labor College and the Quest for Social Reform. He is currently writing a book that examines the comparative peace views of former Columbia professor Nicholas M. Butler, John Dewey, and James T. Shotwell.
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