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The Children Come Full: From High Leverage to Humanizing and Culturally Sustaining Literacy Practices in Urban Schools


by Kindel Nash & Leah Panther - February 11, 2019

This research note offers a critique of high leverage practices, refuting previous claims from a 2016 Teachers College Record commentary based on the authors' study, which initially sought to investigate high leverage practices. It includes discussion about the evolution of the authors' understanding of high leverage practices and eventual decision to abandon that concept based on findings from their study.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: February 11, 2019
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 22669, Date Accessed: 7/14/2020 7:05:21 PM

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About the Author
  • Kindel Nash
    University of Maryland
    E-mail Author
    KINDEL NASH is an associate professor of early childhood education at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and a former pre-K-8th grade teacher and literacy specialist in urban schools. Dr. Nash’s research explores critical issues in early literacy learning–particularly how issues of race, language, and culture interface with children’s school experiences. Her forthcoming book, Honoring Children: From Culturally Relevant to Culturally Sustaining Early Literacy Practices, will be published by the National Council of Teachers of English/Routledge.
  • Leah Panther
    Mercer University
    E-mail Author
    LEAH PANTHER is an assistant professor of literacy education at Mercer University in Atlanta, Georgia. Her research, teaching, and community advocacy focus on adolescent literacy in culturally and linguistically diverse urban schools. Her most recent publication, Child-Created Book Labeling: An Innovative, Culturally Sustaining Literacy Practice (2018), was published in The Reading Teacher.
 
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