Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements

Understanding Teacher Distribution Cross-Nationally: Recent Empirical Evidence


by Amita Chudgar & Thomas F. Luschei — November 02, 2016

Background/Context: There are several important limitations of the existing international literature on the distribution of teachers across students, schools, and regions. Most importantly, the coverage of low-income countries is somewhat uneven, particularly in Africa.

Research Questions: We examine the question of who teaches marginalized children across more than 20 countries in Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and sub-Saharan Africa.

Research Design: We employed descriptive analysis of four cross-national datasets to describe the distribution of teachers across students and schools. We first identified students in the top and bottom levels of key marginalization measures, including achievement scores, belongings in the home, parental education, and language. We then calculated separate means of the key teacher characteristics for students at the top and bottom levels of marginalization to identify gaps in teacher attributes across more and less advantaged students. We also examined gaps in teacher attributes across schools at the top and bottom levels of school infrastructure, average test score performance, size, climate, and location.

Findings/Results: Our results provide systematic and persuasive cross-national evidence of an inequitable distribution of teachers across schools and students.

Conclusions/Recommendations: Our analysis highlights the inequities in education systems that governments may be perpetuating either advertently or inadvertently through teacher recruitment and deployment practices. This underscores the need for governments to continue evaluating their teacher placement policies that may exacerbate such inequities. This work also highlights the importance of simple descriptive data analyses that government agencies may undertake to assess and evaluate the patterns of teacher distribution within their own systems.



To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase Understanding Teacher Distribution Cross-Nationally: Recent Empirical Evidence
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $25 is available for a limited time.
$25
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$210


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: November 02, 2016
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 21712, Date Accessed: 12/15/2017 3:26:16 AM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
Article Tools
Related Articles

Related Discussion
 
Post a Comment | Read All

About the Author
  • Amita Chudgar
    Michigan State University
    E-mail Author
    AMITA CHUDGAR is an associate professor at Michigan State University’s College of Education. Her long-term interests as a scholar focus on ensuring that children and adults in resource-constrained environments have equal access to high-quality learning opportunities irrespective of their backgrounds. Her recent publications include Teacher Distribution in Developing Countries: Teachers of Marginalized Students in India, Mexico, and Tanzania, published by Palgrave Macmillan (2016, with Thomas F. Luschei) and “How Are Private School Enrolment Patterns Changing Across Indian Districts with a Growth in Private School Availability?” in the Oxford Review of Education (2016, with Benjamin Creed).
  • Thomas Luschei
    Claremont Graduate University
    E-mail Author
    THOMAS F. LUSCHEI is an associate professor in the School of Educational Studies at Claremont Graduate University. His research uses an international and comparative perspective to study the impact and availability of educational resources—particularly high-quality teachers—among economically disadvantaged children. His recent publications include Teacher Distribution in Developing Countries: Teachers of Marginalized Students in India, Mexico, and Tanzania, published by Palgrave Macmillan (2016, with Amita Chudgar) and “A Vanishing Rural School Advantage? Changing Urban/Rural Student Achievement Differences in Latin America and the Caribbean,” in the Comparative Education Review (2016, with Loris P. Fagioli).
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS