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Transmediation as a Tool for English Language Learners to Access Academic Discourse


by Paula Wolfe — 2010

This chapter explores the concept of transmediation or translation from one mode (textual) to another (visual). Transmediation has proven valuable in increasing English Learners’ academic reading abilities. There are multiple conceptions of what transmediation is and how it should be implemented, and this paper argues that choices about implementation should be connected to student needs and abilities.


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This article originally appeared as NSSE Yearbook Vol 109. No. 2.


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 112 Number 14, 2010, p. 438-452
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 18489, Date Accessed: 10/16/2017 7:59:08 PM

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About the Author
  • Paula Wolfe
    University of Wisconsin–Madison
    E-mail Author
    PAULA WOLFE is at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she holds positions as assistant professor and secondary English program coordinator. Her award-winning research there focused on a new adolescent demographic. She applied spoken word poetry and hip hop music to better tap the minds of students with diverse backgrounds. This research led her to consult on a documentary film about spoken word poetry.
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