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Bottom-Up Efforts to Improve New York City’s Schooling: The New Localism as Neighborhood-based Education Organizing


by Norm Fruchter — 2009

This article analyzes how Community Organizing and Engagement Program (CO&E) school improvement work in New York City evolved from supporting neighborhood organizing to improve local schools, to building regional coalitions of these neighborhood organizing groups, to coordinating CEJ, a citywide coalition of these groups formed to advance systemic solutions to poor school performance across the New York City school system.


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This article originally appeared as NSSE Yearbook Vol 108. No. 1.


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 111 Number 13, 2009, p. 86-111
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 18461, Date Accessed: 12/12/2017 1:16:34 AM

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About the Author
  • Norm Fruchter
    Brown University
    E-mail Author
    NORM FRUCHTER works on policy and special projects for the Annenberg Institute’s Community Organizing and Engagement division, which he previously directed. He recently completed the film PARENT POWER, Education Organizing in New York City, 1995-2010. Before coming to the Institute, he founded and directed New York University’s Institute for Education and Social Policy. Norm has served as a senior consultant with the Academy for Educational Development and Advocates for Children of New York; director of the Institute for Citizen Involvement in Education in New Jersey; co-founder and co-director of Independence High School in Newark, an alternative high school for dropouts; and, for ten years, an elected school board member in Brooklyn's District 15. He holds a B.A. from Rutgers University and an M.Ed. from Teachers College, Columbia University. He has published extensively in the field of education policy and equity; his most recent book, Urban Schools, Public Will: Making Education Work for All Our Children, was published by Teachers College Press in 2007. He has also written two novels and made several award-winning documentary films. Norm was appointed to the New York City Panel for Educational Policy by Mayor Bill de Blasio in 2013. He was one of five new appointees named to the board, which is responsible for approving all major policy changes and spending decisions at the Department of Education.
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