Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements

Accessing Capital Resources: Investigating the Effects of Teacher Human and Social Capital on Student Achievement


by Alan J. Daly, Nienke M. Moolenaar, Claudia Der-Martirosian & Yi-Hwa Liou — 2014

Background: A growing empirical base suggests that there is a positive relationship between teacher social interaction and student achievement. However, much of this research is based on standardized summative assessments, which, while important, may have limited applicability to timely instructional decision making. As such, in this work, we examine the relationship between teacher social interaction and interim benchmark formative assessments, which have been argued to play a more useful role in instructional decision making.

Purpose: In this study we used a human and social capital framework to explore the relationship between teacher social interaction and student achievement on an interim benchmark formative assessment. We hypothesized that teacher social capital would be positively related with student achievement as measured by an interim assessment, even after controlling for student and teacher demographics as well as proxies for teacher human capital.

Population: A sample of 63 teachers from five elementary schools in a midsize U.S. district completed a demographic and social network survey, from which we generated our human and social capital measures. For student-level data, we collected current and prior student achievement from 1,196 third to fifth grade students on an English Language Arts Interim Benchmark Assessment.

Research Design:We used survey data to conduct social network analysis and hierarchical linear modeling to explore the multilevel relationship between human and social capital and student achievement.

Results: Results indicated that even when controlling for student demographics and prior achievement, teachers’ human and social capital had a significant effect on student achievement as measured by interim assessments. More specifically our results indicated that more teaching experience in the current school was associated with better student performance on the interim assessment. In addition, the act of reaching out to other teachers to share knowledge regarding reading comprehension was associated with higher student scores on the interim assessment even when controlling for demographics and past academic performance.

Conclusions: This study offers a unique insight into the role of accessing capital resources and student achievement in strengthening schools under increased pressure to improve. Our work adds to the growing empirical base that suggests that teacher social interaction has a relationship with student achievement. To encourage social interaction, creating formal policies and structures for teachers to develop social ties with one another related to content may be a useful strategy in supporting student outcomes.



To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase Accessing Capital Resources: Investigating the Effects of Teacher Human and Social Capital on Student Achievement
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $25 is available for a limited time.
$25
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$210


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 116 Number 7, 2014, p. 1-42
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 17486, Date Accessed: 10/23/2017 5:53:38 AM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
Article Tools
Related Articles

Related Discussion
 
Post a Comment | Read All

About the Author
  • Alan Daly
    University of California
    E-mail Author
    ALAN J. DALY is an associate professor and Chair of the Department of Education Studies at the University of California, San Diego. His research and teaching focuses on leadership, educational policy, district reform, and social network theory. Recent studies have focused on research evidence and the supports and constrains of social networks at multiple levels of the educational system ranging from the elementary schools to higher education. In addition, he has published an edited volume on social networks entitled Social Network Theory and Educational Change with Harvard Press and guest-edited special issues of the American Journal of Education and the Journal of Educational Administration.
  • Nienke Moolenaar
    University of California
    E-mail Author
    NIENKE M. MOOLENAAR is a post-doctoral researcher at the Department of Education Studies of the University of California, San Diego and the Department of Educational Organization & Management at the University of Twente, the Netherlands. Her research interests include social capital theory, social network analysis, educational leadership and policy, and shared cognition. Her current work focuses on the co-evolution of social networks and educational change, funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). She published several articles on leadership and social networks, and recently guest-edited a special issue of the American Journal of Education on social networks.
  • Claudia Der-Martirosian
    University of California
    E-mail Author
    CLAUDIA DER-MARTIROSIAN, PhD is a research health scientist at the Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) Veterans Emergency Management Evaluation Center (VEMEC) with over 15 years of experience in quantitative research methods. She was a senior statistician at UC San Diego Department of Education Studies at the time this manuscript was developed. Her research includes one book publication in sociology focusing on the role of networks and economic integration and over 45 co-authored publications in health related fields such as public health, quality of life, and medical education.
  • Yi-Hwa Liou
    University of California
    E-mail Author
    YI-HWA LIOU is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, San Diego. She received a M.S. and Ph.D. in Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her research focuses on the ways in which practitioners access, receive, exchange, and advance contextually situated practices in enacting reform efforts from the lens of social/human/intellectual capital theory and the use of social network theory and analysis. Her recent work on social networks appears in Educational Administration Quarterly and the Journal of School leadership.
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS