Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements

Black African Educational Needs and the Soviet Response


by Harold D. Weaver, Jr. — 1970

Crucial questions in any objective analysis of educational relations between Africa and the Soviet Union would be as follows: 1) What are some of the pressing African educational needs? 2) Has the Soviet Union been involved—both inside and outside the U.S.S.R.—in helping to alleviate these needs? If so, in what ways? This paper attempts to respond to those two basic questions, with data collected up through 1964.


To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase Black African Educational Needs and the Soviet Response
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $25 is available for a limited time.
$25
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$210


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 71 Number 4, 1970, p. 613-628
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 1733, Date Accessed: 10/18/2017 11:51:07 PM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
Article Tools
Related Articles

Related Discussion
 
Post a Comment | Read All

About the Author
  • Harold Weaver, Jr.
    St. John's University
    Mr. Weaver is Adlai E. Stevenson Fellow, United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR), and Assistant Professor of African and Afro-American Studies, Center for African Studies, St. John's. He wishes to express his gratitude to the Ford Foundations Foreign Area Fellowship Program for support during the course of his research on educational relations between Africa and the USSR. The views expressed in his paper, he writes, "are obviously personal and do not in any way reflect those of my present or past sponsor."
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS