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Obesity as an Educational Issue


by Robert Crosnoe — March 03, 2010

Youth obesity rates have risen dramatically. In general, this issue has been defined as a public health problem, and, as such, efforts to address it have mostly included schools to the extent that they can affect physical fitness, diet, and nutrition. Yet, ample evidence indicates that the stigma of obesity rising can also interfere with the educational missions of schools by disrupting the socioemotional development of young people. In this way, rising obesity rates constitute an educational issue that requires different kinds of responses from schools. In this commentary, a sociologist describes the contours of the “obesity pandemic” and puts forward several points for debate about what schools can do not just to reduce the prevalence of obesity but also to prevent the socioemotional risks of obesity from interfering with teaching and learning.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: March 03, 2010
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 15924, Date Accessed: 7/27/2017 12:28:06 AM

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About the Author
  • Robert Crosnoe
    University of Texas at Austin
    E-mail Author
    ROBERT CROSNOE is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and a faculty researcher in the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin.
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