Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements

Non-Evidence about Tracking: Critiquing the New Report from the Fordham Institute


by Kevin G. Welner ó December 14, 2009

A new report authored by Tom Loveless and published by the Fordham Institute misleads in an attempt to convince policymakers to maintain tracking policies. The report combines weak data with questionable analyses to manufacture a flawed argument against detracking.


To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase Non-Evidence about Tracking: Critiquing the New Report from the Fordham Institute
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $20 is available for a limited time.
$20
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$145


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: December 14, 2009
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 15872, Date Accessed: 4/20/2014 2:25:09 PM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
Article Tools
Related Articles

Related Discussion
 
Post a Comment | Read All

About the Author
  • Kevin Welner
    University of Colorado at Boulder
    E-mail Author
    KEVIN G. WELNER is Professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder. His present research examines small school reforms, tuition tax credit voucher policies, and various issues concerning the intersection between education rights litigation and educational opportunity scholarship. His past research studied the change process associated with equity-minded reform efforts - reforms aimed at benefiting those who hold less powerful school and community positions (primarily Latinos, African Americans, and the poor).
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS