Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements

The Paradoxes of High Stakes Testing: How They Affect Students, Their Parents, Teachers, Principals, Schools, and Society


reviewed by Sharon L. Nichols — June 24, 2009

coverTitle: The Paradoxes of High Stakes Testing: How They Affect Students, Their Parents, Teachers, Principals, Schools, and Society
Author(s): George Madaus, Michael Russell, and Jennifer Higgins
Publisher: Information Age Publishing, Charlotte
ISBN: 1607520273, Pages: 264, Year: 2009
Search for book at Amazon.com

Madaus, Russell, and Higgins provide an authoritative historical and contemporary account of the role, impact, and consequences of high-stakes testing—tests that are used to make decisions about people or institutions. Although some of the evidence they present is not new (e.g., that high-stakes testing narrows the curriculum or changes how teachers teach), their contextualization of high-stakes testing from an historical viewpoint offers a fresh and much needed perspective on the evolution and impact of high-stakes testing in society. The authors’ primary argument is that the practice of high-stakes testing presents an inherent paradox. As one example of this, they argue that high-stakes testing may increase student motivation and learning or improve teaching among some, while they erode it for others. Consequently, if we are to use high-stakes testing as a lever for school reform, they ask us to consider how we might “accentuate the positive” while we simultaneously, “eliminate” these... (preview truncated at 150 words.)


To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase The Paradoxes of High Stakes Testing: How They Affect Students, Their Parents, Teachers, Principals, Schools, and Society
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $25 is available for a limited time.
$25
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$210


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: June 24, 2009
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 15685, Date Accessed: 12/16/2017 11:58:48 AM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
Article Tools
Related Articles

Related Discussion
 
Post a Comment | Read All

About the Author
  • Sharon Nichols
    University of Texas, San Antonio
    E-mail Author
    SHARON L. NICHOLS is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Her research interests include high-stakes testing and its impact on teacher development and practice as well as student learning, motivation, and development. She is coauthor of Collateral damage: How high-stakes testing corrupts America’s schools (with D. C. Berliner, Harvard Education Press, 2007). She has also recently published in the Phi Delta Kappan (2008, “Why has high-stakes testing so easily slipped into contemporary American life?” 89(9), 672-676) and Educational Leadership (2008 “Testing the joy out of learning.” 65(6), 14-18). Her current work focuses on the impact of accountability of preservice and in-service teachers on student motivational development.
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS