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New Players, Different Game: Understanding the Rise of For-Profit Colleges and Universities


reviewed by Mark E. Engberg — September 03, 2008

coverTitle: New Players, Different Game: Understanding the Rise of For-Profit Colleges and Universities
Author(s): William G. Tierney and Guilbert C. Hentschke
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore
ISBN: 0801886570, Pages: 232, Year: 2007
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While for-profit colleges and universities (FPCUs) have existed for decades, and certainly became noteworthy for both their rapid growth and affront on traditional notions of postsecondary education, only a handful of comprehensive works exist that effectively draw out the similarities and differences among FPCUs and traditional colleges and universities (TCUs). Tierney and Hentschke’s recent book, Understanding the Rise of For-Profit Colleges and Universities: New Players, Different Game, is an important addition to the extant literature on FPCUs that provides an in-depth examination of the fundamental characteristics of FPCUs while presenting an impartial analysis of the historical and ongoing philosophical and policy debates that undergird their dramatic rise. The authors begin their investigation by ruminating as to whether FPCUs represent a dramatic departure from traditional notions of higher education or alternatively, illuminate an inevitable transition in the evolution of the postsecondary education sector. Ultimately, the answer to this question begets a fundamental... (preview truncated at 150 words.)


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: September 03, 2008
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 15358, Date Accessed: 12/17/2017 2:44:47 PM

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About the Author
  • Mark Engberg
    Loyola University Chicago
    E-mail Author
    MARK E. ENGBERG is an Assistant Professor of Higher Education at Loyola University Chicago. Dr. Engberg is an expert in research methodology, evaluation and assessment, and diversity-based research. Dr. Engberg’s current research agenda is focused on college access and opportunity, with particular emphasis on understanding the role of the high school context on college choice, academic achievement, and persistence. Dr. Engberg has also served as an enrollment management consultant for numerous colleges, helping admission and enrollment professionals build relational databases and employ econometric analyses to simulate admission and financial aid strategies that achieve their goals for access and diversity. He received the 2005 AERA Review of Research award for his article, Improving intergroup relations in higher education: A critical examination of the influence of educational interventions on racial bias. He is actively involved in a number of educational associations and has published in numerous journals, including the Review of Educational Research, TC Record, Journal of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, and the Journal of College Student Development.
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