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Raising the Bar and Reducing Failure on State-Mandated Exit Exams


by Stuart S. Yeh January 28, 2008

A majority of students will soon be subject to exit exams that require knowledge of high school subjects such as algebra and geometry, despite evidence from employers that these topics are frequently unrelated to occupational requirements. A variety of evidence suggests that an alternative approach, involving exit exams that reward each level of student achievement with a corresponding diploma option, is more likely to promote high educational standards and improve student achievement without excessive failure rates.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: January 28, 2008
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 14939, Date Accessed: 11/22/2014 11:33:00 PM

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About the Author
  • Stuart Yeh
    University of Minnesota
    E-mail Author
    STUART YEH is Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Policy and Administration at the University of Minnesota. His research focuses on improved ways of designing assessment and accountability systems. His book, Raising Student Achievement Through Rapid Assessment and Test Reform (Teachers College Press, 2006), recommends changes in federal, state, and district level testing policies.
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