Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements

To Test or Not To Test? Drug Testing Teachers: The View of the Superintendent


by Todd A. DeMitchell, Stephen Kossakoski & Tony Baldasaro — 2008

Purpose: School superintendents are charged with maintaining the safety and security of the schools in their district. One major recognized threat to the security and safety of students and staff is the use of illegal drugs. Superintendents are responding to the constitutionality of student drug-testing policies by implementing drug-testing programs. Are superintendents implementing drug-testing policies in response to recent court decisions that have allowed for the preemployment and the suspicionless drug testing of teachers?

Population: Superintendents nationwide were randomly selected for the study.

Research Design: A mixed methodology was used to address the following questions: (1) Have school districts adopted a mandatory drug-testing policy, either preemployment or suspicionless, for teachers? (2) Do superintendents support a mandatory drug-testing policy, either preemployment or suspicionless, for teachers? (3) Do superintendents have differentiated support for preemployment and suspicionless drug-testing policies for teachers? Legal analysis was used to map the applicable court cases and constitutional ground that forms the foundation of drug testing. Quantitative analysis was used on the 144 returned surveys. The third part of the methodology was an analysis of short-answer questions using quasi-qualitative methods.

Conclusions: This study found that superintendents believe that they have the authority, without offending the Constitution, to implement teacher preemployment and suspicionless drug-testing policies. However, in large part, they are not implementing such policies. The responding superintendents have a greater comfort level with preemployment testing than suspicionless drug testing of teachers. Most superintendents believed that the drug problem among teachers was not large enough to warrant action, but many reserved the right to revisit the implementation of such policies if the circumstances in their school district changed.



To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase To Test or Not To Test? Drug Testing Teachers: The View of the Superintendent
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 110 Number 6, 2008, p. 1207-1240
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 14724, Date Accessed: 12/17/2017 4:39:03 PM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
Article Tools
Related Articles

Related Discussion
 
Post a Comment | Read All

About the Author
  • Todd DeMitchell
    University of New Hampshire
    E-mail Author
    TODD A. DEMITCHELL is a Kimball Fellow and professor in the Department of Education and Justice Studies Program at the University of New Hampshire. His research interests are the legal mechanisms that impact schools and colleges, such as education law, collective bargaining, and policy analysis. Recent publications include Negligence: What Principals Need to Know to Avoid Liability (Roman & Littlefield Education, 2006); “Academic Freedom and the Public School Teacher: An Exploratory Study of Perception, Policy, and the Law” in Brigham Young University Education and Law Journal (with Vincent Connelly); and “Teacher Perceptions of Professionalism and Unionism: A Tangled Relationship” in Education Law Reporter (with Casey Cobb).
  • Stephen Kossakoski
    Supervisory Administrative Unit #16, Exeter, New Hampshire
    STEPHEN KOSSAKOSKI is assistant superintendent for technology and research, Supervisory Administrative Unit #16 in Exeter, New Hampshire. His research interests are high-stakes testing and use of technology.
  • Tony Baldasaro
    University of New Hampshire; Supervisory Administrative Unit #16, Exeter, New Hampshire
    TONY BALDASARO is schools district improvement administrator and a doctoral student at the University of New Hampshire. His research interests are school law and data analysis.
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS