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Leonard Covello and the Making of Benjamin Franklin High School: Education as if Citizenship Mattered


reviewed by Thomas Fallace — May 29, 2007

coverTitle: Leonard Covello and the Making of Benjamin Franklin High School: Education as if Citizenship Mattered
Author(s): Michael C. Johanek & John L. Puckett
Publisher: Temple University Press, Philadelphia
ISBN: 1592135218 , Pages: 384, Year: 2006
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Historical studies of progressive education tend to be of two kinds. The first relates how the well-intended, but faulty ideas of John Dewey and his cadre of pedagogical progressives successfully replaced the academic curriculum with an anti-intellectual, utilitarian one. As a result of these reforms, American schools lost their focus— a consequence we are still paying for today. On the other hand, the second narrative relates how Dewey created a theoretically sound, ambitious plan for improving American schools that, except for a few well-documented examples, never really took hold because conservative critics and social efficiency experts squashed the movement before it was ever given a chance. For authors of the former interpretation, progressive education needs to be overcome and abandoned. For authors of the latter, it needs to be revived and supported. Michael C. Johanek and John L. Puckett’s new book, Leonard Covello and the Making of Benjamin Franklin High School:... (preview truncated at 150 words.)


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: May 29, 2007
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 14501, Date Accessed: 7/21/2017 10:47:28 AM

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About the Author
  • Thomas Fallace
    University of Mary Washington
    E-mail Author
    THOMAS D. FALLACE is an assistant professor of education at the University of Mary Washington and a lecturer at the University of Virginia. He teaches elementary and secondary social studies methods courses and works with student teachers. He has written articles on the history of Holocaust education, the role of historiography in history teacher education, and the origins of the social studies. Professor Fallace is the author of The Emergence of Holocaust Education in American Schools (Palgrave-Macmillan, forthcoming) and “Did the Social Studies Really Replace History in American Secondary Schools?” (Teachers College Record, forthcoming).
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