Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements

Family (Dis)Advantage and the Educational Prospects of Better Off African American Youth: How Race Still Matters


by Travis L. Gosa & Karl L. Alexander — 2007

While the educational difficulties of poor black students are well documented and have been discussed extensively, the academic performance of well-off African American children has received much less attention. Even with economic and educational resources in the home, well-off African American youth are not achieving at the levels of their white peers. Why is this? A review of relevant literature identifies a set of social processes that pose formidable barriers to the academic and personal development of middle-class African American youth, the closing of the black-white achievement gap, and the preservation of African American family advantage across generations. Constituting a social ecology of African American family life, these processes emanate outward from the immediate home environment, through peers and friends, into neighborhoods and schools, and to society at large.


To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase Family (Dis)Advantage and the Educational Prospects of Better Off African American Youth: How Race Still Matters
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $25 is available for a limited time.
$25
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$210


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 109 Number 2, 2007, p. 285-321
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 12800, Date Accessed: 10/18/2017 3:36:05 AM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
Article Tools
Related Articles

Related Discussion
 
Post a Comment | Read All

About the Author
  • Travis Gosa
    Johns Hopkins University
    E-mail Author
    TRAVIS L. GOSA is a doctoral candidate in sociology, Department of Sociology, Johns Hopkins University. His main fields of interest are race, education, and stratification. He is currently examining how middle class black parents manage their children’s schooling.
  • Karl Alexander
    Johns Hopkins University
    E-mail Author
    KARL L. ALEXANDER is John Dewey Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, Johns Hopkins University. His interests center on schools and their role in educational stratification. Since 1982 he and colleague Doris Entwisle have been directing the Baltimore-based Beginning School Study (BSS). The BSS is an on-going, long-term study of youth development with a particular interest in the lasting imprint of early home and schooling experiences. Two books are included among the project’s many publications: “Children Schools and Inequality” (with Linda Olson; Westview Press, 1997); “On the Success of Failure: A Reassessment of the Effects of Retention in the Primary Grades” (with Susan Dauber; Cambridge University Press, 1993, expanded and updated in 2003).
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS