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Moral Questions in the Classroom: How to Get Kids to Think Deeply About Real Life and their Schoolwork


reviewed by Jim Garrison & David Hicks — 2002

coverTitle: Moral Questions in the Classroom: How to Get Kids to Think Deeply About Real Life and their Schoolwork
Author(s): Katherine G. Simon
Publisher: Yale University Press, New Haven
ISBN: 0300090323 , Pages: 256, Year: 2001
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Readers read for many different needs, interests, and purposes. Ours is a joint review constructed from different professional orientations. Therefore, we would like to share our motives for taking up this text. Jim Garrison is a professor of philosophy of education. While not an ethicist, he is interested in the moral aspects of teaching and found this text attractive because of its concern with thinking hard about “existential questions” in the classroom. David Hicks is an assistant professor of social studies education.  He approached the text with the hope of finding a resource through which his students could examine the assertion that social studies is not important for the neatly packaged- teacher centered- textbook based stories that have become the typical genre of social studies teaching. That we both found Simon’s book thought provoking and useful constitutes a sincere recommendation in itself. That we are primarily concerned with preservice teaching, but believe this fine text is even better suited for the K-12 teacher or administrator interested in... (preview truncated at 150 words.)


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 104 Number 5, 2002, p. 934-937
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 10862, Date Accessed: 10/19/2017 11:03:38 PM

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About the Author
  • Jim Garrison
    Virginia Tech University
    E-mail Author
    Jim Garrison is a professor of philosophy of education at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. His research and teaching interests center on pragmatism and especially the philosophy of John Dewey. Among his books are an edited work, The New Scholarship on Dewey, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1995, Dewey and Eros, Teachers College Press, 1997. He wrote the chapter on Education for the companion volume to The Collected Works of John Dewey and was an invited participant at the World Congress of Philosophy in 1998 where he spoke on Dewey’s theory of philosophical criticism. Jim is a past-president of the Philosophy of Education Society.
  • David Hicks
    Virginia Tech University
    E-mail Author
    David Hicks is an assistant professor of social studies education at Virginia Tech. David’s publications have appeared in Social Education, The Mathematics Teacher, Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, and the International Journal of Social Education. Currently he is investigating how concepts of citizenship and the integration of technology can influence how teachers approach the teaching and learning of history and social science.
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