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Board, The Editorial

The Editorial Board — 1943
Looking back over FRONTIERS' ten-year history it seems as though this journal's existence is being cut short at the very moment it was coming of age. Born of the aftermath of the Great Depression, FRONTIERS has been deeply concerned with the crises in social, economic and political affairs throughout the thirties, and the strategic war-election year of 1944 offered the greatest challenge of all.

The Editorial Board — 1943
IF WE WERE CHINESE INSTEAD OF INDO-Europeans, our historians of 2000 A.D. might call the half-century of western life since the 1890s The Time of The Great Learning. Never before our time, have civilized peoples been in such a strategic position to learn how to carry on a complex social system. Especially is this true of the Americans, because of their exceptional geographic and social-political conditions.

The Editorial Board — 1943
The arguments of Frontiers’ Special Paper No. 1 are: I. Battle Over America II. America's Foreign Policy and the World Struggle for Power III. An Enlightened America. The first and third sections of the present issue reflect the study of hundreds of magazine and newspaper articles, including Sunday supplements and features, a score of current books, the writings of distinguished columnists and editorial writers in the full scope of the press—both left, middle and right: the New York Times, Herald-Tribune, Post and PM . . . articles and special "papers" in Fortune, New Republic, Nation, Survey, New Leader, New Masses, Saturday Review . . . the major current government reports, monographs and pamphlets... similar materials of the Foreign Policy Association, the Union for Democratic Action, the Twentieth Century Fund, the National Education Association, the Progressive Education Association and others. Within the limits set by time we have sought to present, always of course within our own frame of reference, the issues, which our people confront, and the dominating and opposed views concerning them.

The Editorial Board — 1943
IN THIS THIRD SECTION, FROM MONTH to month, Frontiers will attempt to do three things. First, it will supplement the current material on the giant "opinion industries"—especially the periodical and book press, the radio, and the movies— which appears in the front section.

The Editorial Board — 1942
"FREEDOM FROM WANT, freedom from fear"; "Victory is essential but victory is not enough." Thus spoke President Roosevelt in two tones to the youth of 29 nations in the International Students Assembly in Washington last September 3—a promise and a warning and a demand broadcast in 31 languages all over the world. "We will not let you down," he said; but "you will have to take your part in shaping" the better world for which we are now fighting.

The Editorial Board — 1942
WITH THE BEGINNING OF THE NINTH YEAR OF PUBLICAtion of FRONTIERS OF DEMOCRACY there are changes on our Editorial Board which must be recorded. With deep regret we have accepted the resignations of two board members who have made significant contributions to the past work of this journal.

The Editorial Board — 1942
The work of this magazine stands clear. It exists to help the educational profession think itself into greater social intelligence. To this end we seek out competent writers to discuss in our pages social questions pertinent to the times. The magazine has a general orientation as to what areas of study are probably more rewarding of study, but its effort is to get its readers to think and decide, each for himself, after an honest study of pertinent data.

The Editorial Board — 1942
IT IS FITTING THAT THIS LAST ISSUE OF OUR JOURNAL this Spring should be devoted to an elaboration of the significance of the NRPB's new Bill of Rights. FRONTIERS OF DEMOCRACY will not appear again until October 15. It is difficult for the Editorial Board to accept this silence during what may prove to be the four most critical months in world history.

The Editorial Board — 1942
A Statement by the Board of Editors.

The Editorial Board — 1942
The MYTH OF RACIAL SUPREMACY WAS UP FOR QUESTION on three widely separated fronts this past month. The most telling questioning took place in the Far East, as J. L. C. points out in another editorial. The most publicized questioning in this country came about because of the protests to an article in that magazine, The Saturday Evening Post.

The Editorial Board — 1942
A MONTH AGO THE QUESTION HERE discussed was how our schools could revise their work so as to support the general war effort. This time we ask questions almost the reverse: wherein must we protect our schools against threats arising from war conditions? And how can we go forward in spite of the war?

The Editorial Board — 1942
AN ENCOURAGING EVIDENCE THAT HUMAN BEINGS CAN learn from their experience is found in the strength of the public demand-that this-time democracy must win the peace as well as the war. As a nation we are now united in the firm determination to see the war through to victory, but we exhibit little tendency to indulge in mass hysteria, intolerance and romantic glorifications of war as such.

The Editorial Board — 1942
ANY AMONG US EVEN REASONABLY well informed must know that our Negro population is not happy about the war and their treatment in it. The explanation is not hard to see nor to understand.

The Editorial Board — 1942
NEVER BEFORE HAS THIS SECTION OF OUR MAGAZINE been so aptly named. New developments take place today with a speed which is breath-taking. Even the short lapse between page proof and publication day can bring forth news items that may tower in importance far above the events that seemed so vital before the presses began to roll. As an example of this whirling scene (and that may perhaps be a better title), let's list some things within our own field of education—new things that deserve more mention and may get it later, but which are only listed here to show the changing picture.

The Editorial Board — 1942
Basic guiding principles.

The Editorial Board — 1942
FOR OUR SCHOOLS, THE WAR IN THE Orient opens a new era. Henceforth both China and Japan will, in new sense and degree, be part and parcel of our history and thinking. At the close of the war we shall owe both these countries new duties. For all these new relationships, both present and future, we must prepare ourselves along new lines. Beginning now, our schools must accept new responsibilities.

The Editorial Board — 1942
3) A further discussion:two differing editorials

The Editorial Board — 1941
ALL OVER THIS COUNTRY OUR SCHOOLS are re-examining themselves to see whether they are doing their full duty to democracy. The world situation and its challenge to democracy has stirred both the resentment and the conscience of the nation. In consequence many varied demands are being made by the public upon the schools, some wise, some otherwise. In this situation certain encouraging steps forward taken by the New York City schools seem worthy of our favorable notice.

The Editorial Board — 1941
AS WE GO TO PRESS, WE MUST RECORD THE FACT THAT the United States is at war with Japan. Much of what has appeared in our pages thus far this fall is now brought into sharper focus. Our official participation, however, raises new questions which this journal must study as the situation develops. This we hope to do.

The Editorial Board — 1941
THE STATEMENT IN OUR OCTOBER ISSUE ON "THIS WAR and America" was sent to the President of the United States, to various Congressmen, to all the liberal journals of opinion, to many newspapers and to all the national commentators on public affairs. As we know from our own office experience, these same groups are bombarded constantly with news releases, announcements, and with urgent pleas from this group and that to publicize and comment on various stands. Our release has died in waste baskets in editors' offices. We are not pouting because it has happened before; it does interest us, however, that what educators say and think and the stands they take do not somehow seem acceptable as news. It is an oblique commentary on the place education has in our national life, an area Frontiers plans to explore in coming issues, looking at what is and what should be.

The Editorial Board — 1941
IT WAS HOGBEN who gave vogue to the pithy phrase used in the title. He saw "a cultural crisis in which Reason is everywhere in retreat." As worded, his statement appears too strong. Not all reason is in retreat. It does appear, however, that along many lines there are signs of retreat. The situation is not good; certain dangers seriously threaten.

The Editorial Board — 1941
CONSPICUOUSLY ABSENT FROM THE FRONTIERS' discussion last month of American participation in the war were the name-callers with personal accusations of bad faith, and the labelling of opponents as secretly connected with Fascism, Communism or "vested capitalistic interests." The arguments pro and con were all relevant if not equally important. In this particular sector of the "Great Debate," evidently a group of people of good will but with radical differences of viewpoint were honestly arguing regarding the position Americans should take with reference to the most critical problem of our day. Where does such argument lead us? Will it change people's minds?

The Editorial Board — 1941
THE UNITED STATES HAS BEGUN TO TAX ITSELF HEAVILY and all signs indicate that this is just the beginning. Several questions are involved in this taxation: the justice of the burden the taxes impose, for example. Does the present measure call for contributions from persons of low income greater than their share in the national wealth?

The Editorial Board — 1941
MANY DISPARAGING REMARKS ABOUT EDUCATION AND educators are being circulated widely. One hears that a high official in our national government has said, "We do not call in educators in our national program. They never agree in conferences. If educators ever get together on any program, we will be ready to listen." Another statement is widely circulated, attributed to the director of an important foundation, "We have invested millions in education and the changes in schools have been meager." Many an educator hangs his head in sorrow when such statements are repeated in his presence.

The Editorial Board — 1941
A Statement to the Educational Profession by Twelve of the Fourteen Members of the Board of Editors of Frontiers of Democracy,offered to the profession as a basis for discussion. It is the hope of the Board of Editors that educators will use this statement in this way in faculty meetings, in classes in education and in community gatherings.

The Editorial Board — 1941
IN THIS, THE LAST ISSUE OF OUR JOURNAL until October 15, we have tried to open up questions which will be of continuing importance throughout the summer and year ahead. Our opening symposium emphasizes two basic facts: it is a new world we are moving into, and that absolutes have no place in that world. Mr. Mock and Mr. Larson in their descriptive article deal with one of education's immediate concerns in this new world, indicating how much and how little is happening to people in the draft camps. Mr. Redefer's article is closely related, for he shows how ill-prepared education is to play a major role in our national life. Comments on these articles which will indicate the most useful direction of our journal next year are solicited.

The Editorial Board — 1941
SO RAPIDLY AND SO TRAGICALLY DOES the world outlook now change that no reliable view into the future seems possible. Yet it is primarily with reference to the future that guidance in teaching must, socially, concern itself. The young, no matter how they be taught, can have no effective part in shaping present political events; their time comes in the future. It is therefore at that future which, socially, our education must aim.

The Editorial Board — 1941
THE STRIKE SITUATION OF THE PAST MONTH IS DISTURBING in many respects. Insofar as the strikes have seriously delayed defense production, there is cause for concern--for America cannot send too little, too late. For the very same reason, insofar as the strikes reflect people's grievances, there is grave cause for concern--for determined and satisfied workers are no less a part of our defenses than the material they produce.

The Editorial Board — 1941
EVERYWHERE AMONG SCHOOL AND college people one encounters disappointment, mistrust or discouragement at the part organized education is playing in Washington. The present period with its confusions, its complex of improvisations, its false starts and bold programs, as a continental democracy painfully organizes itself for defense, is also a time of unusual constructive opportunity. It is a moment when the normal, leisurely process of erosion of outworn educational forms and of construction of vital processes can be greatly accelerated.

The Editorial Board — 1941
IN RECENT YEARS VERY INADEQUATE PROVISION HAS BEEN made for the teaching of philosophy of education in many of the teachers colleges and normal schools. This is the more surprising because so many of the distinguished leaders of American education have been identified with the enterprise of philosophy. A number of factors account for this tendency to give philosophy of education less than its due in the curriculum of the teacher training institutions.

The Editorial Board — 1941
TWO MONTHS ago our main editorial sought to find a consistent attitude for liberalism to take with reference to the Rapp-Coudert investigation. The question then was what to think about the communist tactics used in Brooklyn College. The conclusion reached was against such tactics. We return now again to the same theme.

The Editorial Board — 1941
ORGANIZED LABOR WON A SIGNIFICANT ADVANCE THIS month when the government refused to accept a low bid from Henry Ford which did not comply with our national laws for labor's protection. This is timely recognition that in a democracy there is a relationship between means and ends. This country would make a damaging mistake if, to secure the tools to defend democracy; it ignored conditions of anti-democracy under which the tools are produced. Now when the products of his factories are so urgently needed, it is high time that Henry Ford joined the United States. A War Department concerned for total defense could bring this union about.

The Editorial Board — 1941
THE PRESENT WORLD THREAT TO democracy has stirred our people to unusual depths. In this crisis many are turning to the schools to demand that they teach democracy to our youth as effectively as the schools of Germany, Italy, and Russia are supposedly teaching Nazism, Fascism, and Communism to their respective youth. And not a few among us--even less clear as to what they think--go on to demand that our schools use the method of the totalitarian states, namely indoctrination, for the teaching of our democracy. Because indoctrination was until recent decades the usual method of teaching in our schools, the background thinking of our people is not clear as to the democratic way of teaching democracy. It is this general situation, with the dangers involved, that sets the problem here studied.

The Editorial Board — 1941
IT WAS WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE WHO SAID, "THAT WHICH we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet." As proof that the great Bard of Avon knows noses and roses, we cite the present behavior of some modern educators. There are some who believe oh! so wholeheartedly in progressive education...If they can call it by another name. There are others, more shy ones, who refuse to name at all what they are doing in their schools, although with vigor surprising, they deny in public that it is progressive education.

The Editorial Board — 1941
THE RAPP-COUDERT COMMITTEE was appointed by the New York State Legislature to "investigate, study, and review state aid, administration, conduct, methods, subject matter, and subversive activity" in the public schools of the state. A sub-committee consisting solely of Senator Coudert has been studying the "subversive" aspect of the problem. His hearings have been private, and those testifying have been denied transcripts of their testimony. Up to now the Teachers Union has been the special object of his inquiry, apparently to see what part the Communist party has been playing in the Union.

The Editorial Board — 1940
IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE ELECTION, POWERFUL forces began to press for the achievement of "spiritual unity" within the population. Under the sponsorship of the influential Council for Democracy (285 Madison Avenue, New York) a Carnegie Hall mass meeting was devoted-to the implied theme, "Let's forget our past differences and rally round the President and his defense program." Without raising any skeptical questions concerning the motivation of this particular effort, we may properly inquire what kind of psychological unity is worthy of our support.

The Editorial Board — 1940
Our changing editorial outlooks have illustrated the old saying: Many men, many minds. Each editor has been a personality in his own right and has had the freedom to say what he thought. Thus differences have appeared, and real differences too, but after all, the developing history of the journal has shown no fundamental shift of aim. Each succeeding editorial management has held to the original guiding aim as stated in the first issue of the magazine: to make of the journal "a prime medium for the development of a constructive social consciousness among educational workers." And, it may be added, if this aim was ever urgent, it is so today.

The Editorial Board — 1940
THIS IS TO STUDY ACADEMIC freedom in the light of President Butler’s address to his faculty a month ago and of the reactions that followed. The address was in relation to the program of national defense. The reactions were to certain incidental remarks taken as jeopardizing academic freedom. One particular statement in connection was made by eighteen professors at Teachers College. To this President Butler replied, we may anticipate, in a way to reassure all concerned. Certain questions at issue and their resolution seem worthy of comment here.

The Editorial Board — 1940
IT TAKES NO CRYSTAL GLOBE TO PREDICT THAT THIS WILL be a difficult year for education. Attacks from groups who have long been sharpening their knives will come under the guise of "defense," "economy," "Americanism" and every other label that will obfuscate their real interest. Educators have the choice of pulling in their horns or taking a bold stand for the things they feel are right.

The Editorial Board — 1940
NOR FOR DECADES HAS THERE BEEN so nearly one dominant election issue as now, neither so single nor so clear cut. Other issues in comparison stand aside. As regards threats from abroad and adequate preparedness for war both major candidates seem in fortunate agreement. As regards the third term question, that hardly seems real; few outside of those already otherwise opposed to Roosevelt seem much concerned about it.

The Editorial Board — 1940
AMERICA’S OWN UNDECLARED WAR, THE WAR ON IDEAS and institutions that differ from the accepted norm, developed actively during the last month

The Editorial Board — 1940
THIS ISSUE MARKS THE CLOSE OF THE first year of Frontiers of Democracy and the end of the sixth of the enterprise begun by The Social Frontier. The year’s work has been a threefold study: first, of the American situation, its demands and its resources; second, of the necessity of conscious planning; and third, of the part education should play in the process. In this closing issue as we ask: What is holding us back? The need to go forward is undeniable. No one who is both intelligent and humane could remain content with our country as it is, not to mention the warring world outside.

The Editorial Board — 1940
THERE SEEM TO BE at least two things about our ancestry that we are likely to forget: our relationship to the ape and our common European beginnings. Like Venus born full-bloom out of the sea, many present-day Americans seem to want to believe that they and their families burst upon this world with no beginnings outside of our own rockbound coast . . . and that all who differ are the devil's own.

The Editorial Board — 1940
NEW YORK CITY’S high school enrollment has declined. After years of steady gains the enrollment seems to have reached a peak and to be tumbling. The actual drop is still numerically small: 3,234 pupils less in October, 1939, than in March, 1939. This first sign of decrease may mark the beginning of an era in which most careful educational planning will have to be undertaken.

The Editorial Board — 1940
THE THEME FOR THIS ISSUE IS SOCIAL planning in American life. Our contributors discuss many phases of the problem and well, but the situation demands still more. Besides individual lines of planning, we must have general social planning, ultimate it would seem, in some very far-reaching sense and degree. But while to many of us this seems clear, to most as yet it is not so.

The Editorial Board — 1940
PRESIDENT WASHBURNE and the committee in charge have selected for the National Conference of the Progressive Education Association, to be held in February in Chicago, a theme of unusual timeliness and significance, "Resources and Education." A series of group meetings are being planned for the study of various aspects of die problem of our natural, human, and cultural resources, and the peculiar responsibilities of education in equipping the American people to make a more intelligent use of these resources.

The Editorial Board — 1940
THERE HAS BEEN MUCH ADO about the proposed merger of the Horace Mann and Lincoln Schools of Teachers College. Some have charged that the merger is a body blow against the progressive education movement; others gossiped about a supposed misapplication of funds. Among the general public many have assumed that "where there is smoke, there must be fire".

The Editorial Board — 1940
An Editorial.

The Editorial Board — 1939
THE LIFTING OF THE EMBARGO on arms and munitions to nations at war makes us armourer-in-chief to Great Britain and France. The full significance of this step does not seem to be appreciated. It means that as an arsenal we are already "in" the present European conflict, albeit on terms of limited participation. The repeal was unquestionably accomplished in accordance with the usual legislative processes of a political democracy; the Congressional vote reflected fairly accurately the division of sentiment within the population.

The Editorial Board — 1939
ON THE twentieth of October John Dewey, unsurpassed interpreter of the modern mind and of the meaning of American democracy and education, was eighty years old. His birthday was celebrated by gatherings of progressives held in all parts of the country. In New York City fourteen labor, civic, scientific and educational organizations united to sponsor a dinner in his honor.

The Editorial Board — 1939
THIS FIRST issue of FRONTIERS OF DEMOCRACY appears at a solemn time when on much of this world, man is fighting man. We take what small comfort we can from the fact that Americans today, a few weeks after the start of the war, do not yet seem to have closed their minds. There is neither the freezing pessimism that we can't stay out, nor the restrictive ness that comes with certainty as to just how we should conduct ourselves. So long as this restrained spirit of inquiry prevails, there is hope that we can keep before us the total picture of living. We must try to see ourselves as neutrals and try to understand what that means, to be sure. But important as that is, it is still only a part of die picture. If we stay neutral, we will be a neutral democracy; if we become engaged, we will become a democracy at war; after the peace, we will still be a democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1939
Directed at fuzzy political, social, and educational ideas.

The Editorial Board — 1939
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1938
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1938
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1938
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1938
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1938
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1938
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1938
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1938
THE "incidental" recommendation contained in the report of the President's Advisory Committee on Education that federal funds be made available for the support of private and parochial schools raises one of the most fundamental issues in the history of American education and politics. Let there be no mistake about what is involved in this proposal. It means that public money will be de made available to finance schools not controlled by the public.

The Editorial Board — 1938
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1938
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1938
THE man who has been President of the United States since 1933 is often considered to be the most socially minded Chief Executive the country has had since the days of Lincoln. As evidence we are invited to consider the remarkable change in the general climate of opinion that has occurred during the last five years, the enthusiastic support which labor and liberal groups have given him, and the many helpful new policies and measures which have become operative during his administration.

The Editorial Board — 1938
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1938
BEGINNING in January, 1938, the Editors of THE SOCIAL FRONTIER plan to list annually a limited number of educators whose -work reveals the great possibilities of the a school as progressive social force. We are conscious that this the first public ventures in the way of a Roll of Honor for American teachers. A major purpose designating these individuals is to call the attention of the profession to those special forms of social service which we believe merit the interest and probation of all teachers. In preparing the list, we are happy to have had the assistance of our national directors and our interested readers all over the country.

The Editorial Board — 1937
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1937
SOME understanding of the bitter controversy between the American Federation of Labor and the Committee for Industrial Organization is essential if educators are to prove helpful to communities affected by this internecine warfare THE SOCIAL FRONTIER’S sympathies lie with the C.I.O., largely because it represents vigorous and effective progressivism contrasting sharply with the unimaginative officialdom of the painfully conservative A.F.L.

The Editorial Board — 1937
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1937
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1937
WITH this number THE SOCIAL FRONTIER enters upon its fourth year of service to the teaching profession of our country. We find it hard to believe that we have already passed our third birthday, but that may be one of those illusions whereby "filled space tends—so psychologists assure us—to appear shorter than unfilled.

The Editorial Board — 1937
ACCORDING to the unimpeachable authority of the American Civil Liberties Union, 24 strikers, one police officer, and no non- striking workers (i.e., "scabs") were killed in industrial disputes in the United States from January 1 to July 31, 1937. This is a sorry picture and suggests that the prejudice aroused against organized labor based on alleged acts of violence is largely without foundation. The figures imply that far greater violence is used against strikers, especially on picket lines, than by them.

The Editorial Board — 1937
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1937
AN ANCIENT rule of wisdom advises that when the blind lead the blind they all stumble into the ditch. What happens when the blind try to lead those whose eyes have been partially opened, educational organizations may soon discover.

The Editorial Board — 1937
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1937
WE never have outlined a national educational policy in America. We have nurtured a national faith in education. Our statesmen are often eloquent about the absolute dependence of democratic self-government upon adequate public education facilities.

The Editorial Board — 1937
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1937
THE SOCIAL FRONTIER here publishes as an editorial the telegram to President Roosevelt, which grew out of a discussion of current affairs and their relation to education in a joint meeting of the Fellows of the John Dewey Society and the Directors of THE SOCIAL FRONTIER at New Orleans on February 21, 1937.

The Editorial Board — 1937
IT IS being bruited abroad that the meeting of the Department of Superintendence of the N.E.A. (now the American Association of School Administrators) at New Orleans, showed remarkable liberalizing developments.

The Editorial Board — 1937
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1937
IGNORANT defamation of American education is common enough, but decidedly dismaying when it comes from the pen of an editor of the intelligently successful Harper’s Magazine. In the January and February numbers, Bernard De Voto has slumped in his "Easy Chair" and let his raw prejudices flow out over the schools. He begins by a defense of hypocrisy and petty-gossip in abridging the freedom of teachers.

The Editorial Board — 1937
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1937
EDUCATORS attending the convention of the Department of Superintendence of the N.E.A. at New Orleans will be afforded exceptional opportunities both for learning and for teaching. New Orleans is a city replete with exotic charm—one of the few large American cities with a distinctive flavor and culture. Its citizens and teachers in planning the welcome for delegates have gone to exceptional lengths in assuring that the visiting educators shall be made enjoy-ably conscious of their city's qualities.

The Editorial Board — 1937
THOSE who relied on the newspapers for the facts did not get the whole story of the Frank affair.

The Editorial Board — 1937
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1936
THE LESSONS the Spanish tragedy offers those actively concerned with the future of democracy are many. Perhaps the most significant, and most disturbing, is the apparent inability of democracy to protect itself against the anti-democratic forces at large in the world today.

The Editorial Board — 1936
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1936
IT IS ALWAYS an occasion for surprise and distress when Jove nods. Among scientific leaders in America there is none more careful to try to state fairly and honestly his opponents' position, than Edward L. Thorndike. Why then, the complete misunderstanding and misrepresentation of critics of the profit motive, in Thorndike's article in the September number of Harpers Magazine?

The Editorial Board — 1936
In the judgment of the editorial committee functioning during the absence of Professor Counts from the country, the importance of the work of the N.E.A. Policies Commission calls for this extended editorial comment at this time. Professor Counts, who is a member of the Commission, was not consulted in the preparation of this statement.

The Editorial Board — 1936
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1936
The Social Frontier wishes to enlist readers from all parts of the United States in continued discussion of the social aims and reverberations of public education. The editors owe no allegiance to any particular section of the country nor to any particular school system or higher institution of learning. They have no personal or professional axe to grind. The viewpoint of the journal is based on the fundamental Americanism of, the Founding Fathers as that has been developed by changed material conditions, increasing knowledge, and broadening vision since the early days of the Republic. We would alter existing institutions by educational means until it is possible for everybody to enjoy the cultural opportunities now available only to a fortunate minority. Wisdom for this task, we believe, is being developed in differing ways in different sections of our country. By giving expression in the pages of our magazine to varying theoretic analyses and practical programs for the realization of this end we believe that we are advancing the cause of a genuinely educational democracy.

The Editorial Board — 1936
THE AMERICAN NEWSPAPER GUILD is out to win its second battle with Hearst. While Hearst officials and Hearst papers deny that the Milwaukee settlement represented a Guild victory, impartial examination of conditions guaranteeing the wages and working hours agreements on the Wisconsin News before and after the strike indicates clearly that the Guild came out on top.

The Editorial Board — 1936
THERE ARE PORTENTOUS SIGNS on the educational horizon. The next twelve months will be critical. Education will be affected by the outcome of the presidential campaign.

The Editorial Board — 1936
DURING the past year we have opened our pages to a consideration of the role of class in American society.

The Editorial Board — 1936
OUR "Journal of Educational Criticism and Reconstruction," with this issue, rounds out its second year. To say that in the two years of its existence it has fulfilled the varied expectations of its readers or even the closely integrated hopes of its Editors and its Board of Directors would be gross exaggeration.

The Editorial Board — 1936
IF THE daily press is to be believed, a perfectly incredible story seems to be unfolding in the state of Michigan.

The Editorial Board — 1936
EVIDENCE is accumulating that a large section of the membership of the American Legion possesses a far higher conception of the meaning of Americanism than certain of the national leaders. Apparently there are many legionnaires who do not relish the reputation for reaction, which the Legion has acquired.

The Editorial Board — 1936
Should schools teach the facts about all forms of government, including communism, fascism, and so forth? The replies to the query summarized below should bring greater hope and courage to educators everywhere.

The Editorial Board — 1936
FOR many years a leader of one of the greatest institutions of higher learning in this country, President James Rowland Angell, of Yale, is no mere university administrator. He enjoys the status of one of education's elder statesmen. It can be assumed that his views help to shape to a considerable extent the educational thinking of schoolmen in America. Dr. Angell's recent annual report, therefore, deserves more than a passing notice.

The Editorial Board — 1936
LEADING the van of this year's array of commencement orators is Governor Alfred M. Landon. On May 18th the famous budget balancer and presidential aspirant addressed the graduating class of the Attica, Kansas, High School. Just how much Mr. Landon contributed to the guidance of the twenty young people who were fortunate enough to hear him in person will never be known.

The Editorial Board — 1936
WHY do we tolerate persons--practical idealists--who discredit all our generally accepted practices? Whenever, by sweat and suffering, we attain a tolerable level of existence, immediately we are told how low the level is.

The Editorial Board — 1936
AT THE meeting of the Department of Superintendence in St. Louis, President Glenn Frank of the University of Wisconsin, delivered an address on "Education and the Social Welfare." This address was remarkable in many ways. Moreover, the chances are that we have not heard the last of it. Already it has been published in several places and has been repeated in various parts of the country.

The Editorial Board — 1936
A SUBSCRIBER has taken exception to our April editorial on the meeting of the Department of Superintendence.

The Editorial Board — 1936
EDWIN R. A. SELIGMAN, Professor Emeritus of Columbia University, famed economic scholar, and Editor-in-Chief of the Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, on the occasion of his seventy-fifth birthday on April 25th, consented to make a statement to the press. He reported that he was "hopeful for the future." "Capitalism is changing," he said.

The Editorial Board — 1936
WHAT is now happening to art and the artist cannot be ignored in any survey of the social trends, which have a bearing on the cultural possibilities of American life. The good life calls for art, which shall direct and shall itself be directed by broad human ideals and the striving of the masses of the people for greater dignity, freedom, and beauty.

The Editorial Board — 1936
An economic and industrial system that depreciates the intelligence, ignores the freedom of man and suppresses his natural rights stands condemned by the teaching of the Catholic educator as not compatible with the dignity of human nature and with human rights.

The Editorial Board — 1936
THE first duty of friends of democracy during the present troubled period is to guard with a jealous eye all of those liberties guaranteed in the bills of rights of the federal and state constitutions. Here unquestionably is our last line of defense.

The Editorial Board — 1936
AMERICAN youth is pushing steadily forward in recognizing the social contradictions and the experimental opportunities of the American scene. True, there is no Youth Movement as such--that must await the crystallization of issues more absorbing in appeal than those now evidenced.

The Editorial Board — 1936
THAT making people intelligent will, on the whole, promote the good life and good citizenship has been assumed by our school system from its beginning. But there has been a kink in the notion of intelligence.

The Editorial Board — 1936
IN THE years 1917 and 1918, millions of American boys were called to the colors with the battle-cry of "making the world safe for democracy." Whatever may be the verdict of history regarding he underlying conditions and purposes of the World War, the fact is indisputable that the great majority if those boys believed firmly that they were engaged in the age-long struggle against tyranny.

The Editorial Board — 1936
ON MARCH 28th at the Hotel Astor in New York City, a testimonial luncheon was given to Henry Richardson Linville.

The Editorial Board — 1936
IT is easy to call a meeting notable. During its history the Department of Superintendence has held many notable meetings--meetings to be remembered for one reason or another. But like other organizations it has held few significant meetings--meetings marking important developments in the history of American education.

The Editorial Board — 1936
IN REMOVING Payson Smith from the office of Commissioner of Education, Governor Curley of Massachusetts and the interests, which he represents, issued a warning and a challenge to all teachers and friends of education throughout the United States.

The Editorial Board — 1936
THE American teaching profession owes a debt of gratitude to Dr. Charles A. Beard and to Mr. George F. Davis for the masterly way in which they have exploded the fiction that teachers are not concerned with politics.

The Editorial Board — 1936
A CONFUSED interpretation of non-partisanship besets the social studies wherever teachers endeavor to be officially "on the fence" in respect to all issues upon which our people are divided. That fence sitting cannot be a universal rule, and ought not to be, should be obvious.

The Editorial Board — 1936
THE deliberations of the annual convention of the Progressive Education Association, held in Chicago at the end of February, add much to the hope that this organization may contribute considerably to the social maturity of the American teaching profession. The Progressive Education Association does not pretend to be, and has no aspiration of becoming, an all-inclusive teachers' organization.

The Editorial Board — 1936
Young Mr. Donald MacMurray, twenty-one and a New Yorker, entered the University of Chicago last fall, determined to complete four years' college work in one. He will have accomplished it by the time spring rolls 'round, his teachers say, if he passes two final psychology examinations. He announced when taking advantage of the school's new plan, permitting students to progress as rapidly as they can, that he would try to establish a record in educational cramming.

The Editorial Board — 1936
THE W. P. A. is no model of efficiency. It is a huge, bungling apparatus, constructed overnight to meet one of the major problems of the depression-that of the unemployed employable on the dole.

The Editorial Board — 1936
THIS number of The Social Frontier is devoted to the most urgent issue now before American education. Powerful forces, organized on a nationwide scale, are seeking to make the school an instrument of profound reaction. These forces have already succeeded in putting repressive laws on the statute books of twenty-two states and the District of Columbia.

The Editorial Board — 1936
THE suggestion has come from some quarters that the issue of freedom in the schools is for the most part a false issue--an issue created out of whole cloth by a small number of radicals. If the radicals were only suppressed, so the argument runs, the issue would disappear and everybody would be happy.

The Editorial Board — 1936
A SECOND solution to the problem is closely linked with the foregoing. Some persons, while maintaining a straight face, make the weighty observation that teachers would never get into any trouble, if they only had the good sense to keep away from all dangerous issues.

The Editorial Board — 1936
FROM the experience of recent years one conclusion emerges clear and unequivocal. It is this: if schools are to enjoy that measure of freedom which the best interests of society require, educators will have to lead the fight for it.

The Editorial Board — 1936
In the following group of articles the Editors have attempted to present a scale of representative ideas concerning the significance, scope, and limitations of academic freedom.

The Editorial Board — 1936
IN THE foregoing pages The Social Frontier has presented a variety of ideas concerning the social significance, scope, and limitations of liberty of teaching and the strategy whereby genuine freedom of the school might be achieved.

The Editorial Board — 1936
CLASSROOM teachers are reaching for power. Here is one of the most significant tendencies of the period. Teachers are becoming increasingly insistent on speaking for themselves, on placing representatives from their own number in positions of responsibility, on having a voice in the formulation of the policies of their profession.

The Editorial Board — 1936
AT THE meeting of the Department of Superintendence in Atlantic City last February a group of educators took steps to launch a society for the study of education in its social aspects and relations. In the meantime the society has been christened The John Dewey Society and three year-books have been projected.

The Editorial Board — 1936
TEACHERS have a good deal to learn from the members of the American Liberty League and The National Association of Manufacturers. These embattled roundsmen of the lords of profit and property are in business. They know what is bad for their business and they use every means at their disposal to combat it.

The Editorial Board — 1936
EVERY teacher in the United States should read the January issue of The Social Questions Bulletin, published by the Methodist Federation for Social Service. He should read and ponder.

The Editorial Board — 1936
AT THE fifth annual convention of the Pi Gamma Mu Society on December 28, Professor E. A. Ross of the University of Wisconsin added lustre to his reputation as a man of courage, integrity, and human sympathies. He also outlined a plan for exposing William Randolph Hearst in his unprincipled and vicious attack upon the schools of the country.

The Editorial Board — 1936
THAT the public school is an organ of society, and that the prime function of education by the state is to contribute to "the social order desired by society" is axiomatic.

The Editorial Board — 1936
IN THE sphere of educational theory and social thought in general the notions that the fundamental division in society is economic, that the prime mover behind institutional and cultural change is the conflict between economic classes, and that class struggle is a promising vehicle for bringing about a new and desirable scheme of life, are ever increasing in challenge. Sincere and intelligent educators may reject all these notions but they cannot be said to be very sensitive to the currents of contemporary thought unless they have carefully examined this powerful theory of social dynamics.

The Editorial Board — 1936
CONTROVERSY over birth control now rages between religious leaders of American Catholicism and leaders in the Protestant and Jewish faiths. With respect to the questions of war, social welfare, crime, and motion picture content, there has lately been remarkable agreement between these great religious denominations.

The Editorial Board — 1936
The vast majority of Americans earn less than enough to provide adequately for the basic needs of life as defined by so-called "American" standards, whereas a tiny fraction of the population is richer than Croesus ever dreamed of being. Any real democracy is manifestly impossible where differences of such extent in economic status obtain.

The Editorial Board — 1936
Letters from the readers.

The Editorial Board — 1936
THE National Education Association, with the cooperation of the Department of Superintendence, has recently taken a step which merits far more attention in the press and in the thought of the country than it has received. The Association has created an Educational Policies Commission.

The Editorial Board — 1936
Two hundreds years after Peter Zenger gave America its free press, we are undertaking today to finish the job that Zenger began. We’ll see it through.

The Editorial Board — 1936
UNTIL the next world war Armistice Day will probably signalize the end of the unutterable slaughter of the years 1914-1918. To most persons it will signalize peace. Or at least so thought the members of the Federation of Christian Youth in the Eastbay region of California when they prepared for the recent Armistice Day celebration in Oakland.

The Editorial Board — 1936
BY ENACTING a measure requiring the display of of the American flag wherever fifteen or more persons are foregathered to discuss politics, the Board of Alderman of New York City have made a notable contribution to the art of statecraft.

The Editorial Board — 1936
IN MASSACHUSETTS, once the seat of American liberty, Attorney General Dever, acting at the request of Governor Curley, has outlined stern measures to force all schools into line behind the Teachers’ Oath Law.

The Editorial Board — 1936
MORE than a hundred years ago, in the days of Andrew Jackson and the homespun democracy, a brilliant young Frenchman crossed the Atlantic to study life and institutions under the American republic. The result was the most penetrating work on the United States ever penned by a foreigner. The young man was Alexis de Tocqueville and the work was Democracy in America.

The Editorial Board — 1936
CAN a degree of politico-economic intelligence sufficient to the needs of the present day situation be spread among teachers in American schools and colleges? We are a people torn between loyalties to time-worn shibboleths and vague strivings toward a new and bolder outlook.

The Editorial Board — 1936
AS THE conditions of social instability, here and abroad, continue unabated, the choices before all those who cherish the ideal of an abundant and free life rapidly narrow down to the alternative of united action by liberals and radicals in the face of common dangers and common opportunities and abject surrender to the forces of reaction. Both liberals and Marxians need to realize the fallacies which lie behind the wreckage of their dreams and which have thus far prevented united action in the presence of the common foe—fascism.

The Editorial Board — 1935
The Social Frontier cannot but welcome the support which the Wisconsin legislature has thus given to the much needed improvement of the school program. This Journal believes that the initiative for socially significant changes in the conduct of the school should emerge in the main from the profession itself.

The Editorial Board — 1935
EVIDENCE is accumulating that the American people will not tolerate indefinitely the loyalty oaths for teachers, which during recent years have been forced through timid legislatures by the darkest and most reactionary forces in American life. Voices in high places, which should have been heard before, are inveighing against them

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE SOCIAL FRONTIER, from its first issue, has contended that education cannot and should not be reduced to a process of criticism. It has pointed out that criticism itself cannot proceed in a social vacuum in the rarefied atmosphere of absolute and universal principles, but must be carried on within a given framework of values and experience.

The Editorial Board — 1935
The function of science is, of course, to advance the frontiers of human understanding and objective accomplishment. But science must always operate under a social system of some kind. It is, therefore, to the interest of scientists, educators, and intellectuals generally to study in the well-established, cool, detached manner of their calling the alternative social systems of modern times.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THERE is some reason for believing that persons opposed to war can learn from experience. The Social Frontier is, of course, entirely and even painfully aware of the seeming rashness of this statement.

The Editorial Board — 1935
MANY persons of prominence in public life are joining the vocal crusade to lower the autobile accident toll. The year 1935 saw one million casualties with over 30,000 deaths. Money is being made on articles and pamphlets reporting the terrifying results upon human life when car meets car along our broad highways.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE type of speaker engaged by national and state association officials to address teachers' conventions is literally disgraceful.

The Editorial Board — 1935
As far back as the middle of the sixth century Heraclitus declared that "there are no laws but the laws of change," and that, "everything flows." At no time was change more rapid and more compelling than now. But the idea of change never was and still is not to the liking of many respectable and respected members of the community.

The Editorial Board — 1935
IN SEPTEMBER of this year, the N.E.A. published a research bulletin entitled The Teacher's Economic Position. Inspired and outlined by the arm chair reflections of a typical Associational committee of "key" educators worried about the "morale" of the rank and file, this bulletin was efficiently produced by a staff of trained researchers at obviously considerable expense.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE late Professor George H. Mead of the University of Chicago once interpreted democracy as an attempt to "institutionalize revolution." Here unquestionably is the central article of the political faith of the American people.

The Editorial Board — 1935
OBVIOUSLY the "Open Letter to Boyd H. Bode and William H. Kilpatrick," (October, 1935) failed by a long shot in achieving an immortal place in the annals of American humor. It was not, however, totally without effect for it elicited a very lucid and very interesting statement from Dr. Bode on the what and the why of his differences with the editorial policy of The Social Frontier (November, 1935). We shall try to answer this statement.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE newly elected President of Connecticut State College, Dr. A. N. Jorgensen, is to be congratulated for taking a step to remove from that institution the stigma of inquisitorial practice and to restore the College to its place among institutions of learning. Not a gigantic step, but a good beginning.

The Editorial Board — 1935
HOW is the mind of youth to be kept away from dangerous issues? Here is one of the supreme educational questions of all times. Here is a question that has faced every ruling class in history when it felt its position and privileges threatened.

The Editorial Board — 1935
ON OCTOBER 23 there appeared in the daily press an item which must have cheered the people of California, even as it dismayed the inhabitants of New York. The item was an open letter to the world, though addressed to the Editor of Daily Variety, Hollywood, California, from William Randolph Hearst

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE number of capable educational workers who are cast ruthlessly aside by school and college administrators for insufficient or unexplained reasons steadily mounts. The dismissal last summer of five members of the State Teachers College Faculty at Lockhaven, Pennsylvania, is but one of many instances in this record.

The Editorial Board — 1935
IT IS no secret that once the rank and file of the American army had tasted the grim reality of war on the Western front in 1917 and 1918, the almost universal wish was for peace. Numerous and successive premature rumors of peace formed the main topic of conversation among the common soldiers.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE readers of The Social Frontier are doubtless acquainted with the fact that the American Council on Education has set up a commission to mate a five-year study of the whole field of the care and education of American youth. The work of the commission will be adequately and even generously financed by the General Education Board. Already a grant of $800,000 has been made, $500,000 for overhead and $300,000 for two special studies. And this is presumably only the beginning. It looks like the youth of the nation are going to be studied thoroughly: they will be counted and measured and questioned as never before in history.

The Editorial Board — 1935
IN THE last issue The Social Frontier editorially suggested that the destiny of education, educators, and society in general depended on the outcome of the conflict between those who own and those who create wealth. It was pointed out that teachers are essentially workers—creators of wealth. In consequence, it was held right and proper for teachers to align themselves with labor and to utilize the school in an attempt to bring about a decision, which is favorable to the working population.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE struggle in the New York Local of the American Federation of Teachers, as represented in this issue, is utterly tragic. And not its least tragic aspect is the fact that it seems to be typical of liberal and radical movements. An organization, already pitifully weak in the light of its heavy tasks, has dissipated its energies for years in internecine strife.

The Editorial Board — 1935
Recently there has come to our office, through channels entirely trustworthy, a communication, which, though not intended for our eyes, tends to discredit The Social Frontier—its founders, its contributors, and indirectly its readers. Since the journal is involved through the use of your names in the communication, we feel impelled to call it to your attention; and since it is marked confidential, we believe it to be a true document and therefore worthy of the widest possible publicity.

The Editorial Board — 1935
The Social Frontier notes with deep regret the suicide on July 7th of President W. E. Sealock of the Municipal University of Omaha. President Sealock's death came as the climax of a series of developments and practices in his Board of Regents, similar instances of which are all too common among the substantial citizens who constitute the controlling boards of American universities.

The Editorial Board — 1935
IN AN editorial last June on the coming meeting of the National Education Association at Denver The Social Frontier observed that "while there are many issues in the current situation, there is one that overshadows all others—the issue of freedom in the schools." The event proved this observation correct. The question of teacher-freedom dominated the convention throughout its deliberations.

The Editorial Board — 1935
TEACHERS will prove themselves to be extraordinarily myopic if they fail to realize that the battle for freedom of the school to examine what ails American society and to propose ways to social health extends far beyond the office of the superintendent or president and the council room of the Board of Education or Board of Trustees. The truth of the matter is that the teachers' front traverses the legislatures of the forty-eight states and the United States Congress. If teachers fight their battle on too narrow a front they might, like the African explorer in the movies, save themselves from a mosquito only to be devoured by a tiger.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THERE are two points, each having its important corollary, about which no intelligent teacher can afford to be vague. First, there is no hope for the significant practice of education in a social order based on private property and profit—especially when these foundations are badly shaken. Second, teachers alone, no matter how intelligent and social-minded they might individually be, and no matter how effectively they might be organized, cannot unaided lay the foundations of a new social order.

The Editorial Board — 1935
RESOLUTION and zealous action minus patient, rational analysis of complicated social factors are never sufficient to render any inspired cause triumphant. The problem, which confronts those who would move America toward the ideal of a cooperative commonwealth, is a deeply involved one. It calls for an elaborate and detailed scrutiny of mass psychology, an analysis of the entire American social and cultural background, and an experimental construction of educational techniques aimed at broadening the political intelligence of the populace.

The Editorial Board — 1935
MEN are born and men die, but the human race and civilization live on forever, (at least let us so hope). There is, therefore, something very inspiring in the vision of a man who is oblivious to the paltry ambitions, interests, sufferings, failures, and successes of individuals in order the more to concern himself with the destiny of the race and civilization.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE present issue brings to a close the first year of publication of THE SOCIAL FRONTIER. A brief glance backward and forward therefore is not out of place. Although the journal has not brought about the new social order during the first year, its founders feel that they have just cause for gratification. Whatever may be said for and against the journal, all must agree that it has thrown out a challenge to educational complacency and conservatism and has stimulated thought on issues hitherto neglected.

The Editorial Board — 1935
IN July the National Education Association meets in Denver. Never before in its history has the Association faced a more critical situation.

The Editorial Board — 1935
MUCH has been said and written in recent years about the importation of ideas and doctrines from Russia. Even THE SOCIAL FRONTIER has been accused of receiving gold direct from Moscow. The informed citizen knows, of course, that this is nonsense; yet in a fashion rarely mentioned in the press or on the platform the American people do seem to be imitating a Russian example of venerable age. They, or at least some of their more vocal and powerful representatives, are becoming afraid of ideas and of centres of learning. They are becoming afraid of their own youth.

The Editorial Board — 1935
SENSITIVE people familiar with biblical literature will recollect the sense of wonder and of horror they experienced when they first read of the rites connected with the ancient Canaanite religious worship. In their utter devotion to what they considered an ideal and absolute "good" the old Canaanites were accumstomed to bring human beings as burnt-offerings on the altar* of that "good"—the Great God Moloch. That sense of wonder though not of horror will be largely mitigated upon the reflection that even now and among us there are many sincere and respectable people who for the sake of "individualism," "freedom," "initiative," "trueAmericanism" would maintain the institutions of private property and private profits which result in so much wastage of human life and human energy.

The Editorial Board — 1935
FROM state to state over the entire land the curricula of the public normal schools and teachers colleges are as like as peas in a pod. Only with extreme rarity does a state or city educational administrator display real statesmanship by looking the teacher-training problem in the face and proposing a program at variance with tradition.

The Editorial Board — 1935
ADMIRERS of Mark Twain will perhaps be able to recall the description, which he once wrote of a certain statue. In this description the author maintains throughout an appearance of gravity and appreciation. If, however, the reader will take the trouble to construct a mental picture from the data, which are furnished him, he is led to an astonishing result.

The Editorial Board — 1935
IT is an old American custom to dispose of the unpleasant by loudly announcing its demise. The custom seems to have its most vigorous and vociferous practitioners, in spite of well-organized propaganda to the contrary, in persons serving openly or secretly as public relations counsellors to the status quo. The depression has produced such persons in great numbers—among them Mr. Morse A. Cartwright, Director of the American Association for Adult Education.

The Editorial Board — 1935
It is time to re-examine the actual and the possible relation of science to social health, and therefore the place and the functions of science in public education.

The Editorial Board — 1935
WHILE liberal teachers are busily engaged in debating whether it is ethically correct and psychologically sound to disseminate their conviction that a new social order is necessary and desirable, the major portion of the press skillfully continues to bolster up our present moribund institutional system.

The Editorial Board — 1935
DECISIVE public pronouncements by American college and university presidents upon subjects of some contemporary significance are exceedingly rare. This is quite natural in view of the largely irrelevant qualifications demanded by business-minded trustees in the men who are to direct higher education.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE land of opportunity! The haven of the oppressed of all nations! The emblem of hope and progress and youthful vigor! In such terms did the American people speak and think of their country for generations. In such terms did the exploited classes of Europe appraise the republic during the first century and more of its existence. In the course of a hundred years following the election of Andrew Jackson more than thirty million men, women, and children crossed the Atlantic to seek their fortunes in the United States. And for an even longer period American youth found opportunity for personal advancement in the open lands of the West and in the growing cities of the East and in capitalistic industry everywhere. But gradually the terms in the American social and economic equation were altered.

The Editorial Board — 1935
ONLY in modern times and among supposedly civilized peoples has the younger generation come to be regarded as an abiding nuisance. The reason for this ironic historical twist is obviously enough the breakdown of inherited ways of thinking, feeling, and acting which has followed upon technologically conditioned changes in the workaday world.

The Editorial Board — 1935
ON April 6, the Associated Press reported that two teachers in the Muskegon, Michigan, high schools were without contracts for next year. One, Francis W. Beedon, AM., acting head of the Social Science department and for twelve years a teacher in the Muskegon High School was accused by Superintendent John A. Craig of having been "indiscreet," in that Beedon had raised in class a question about whether he, a married man with four children, should receive die same pay as a fellow teacher with no dependents.

The Editorial Board — 1935
PERHAPS the most common refuge of educational and social conservatism is the appeal to the expert. Again and again, when it is proposed that the school shift its basic orientation from the past to the future, from individualism to collectivism in economy, from the service of the few to the service of the many, the objection is raised that teachers are teachers and not economists or political scientists. They should stick to their last. They must wait upon the agreement of the experts. This persuasive and convenient alibi for inaction invites a number of observations and comments.

The Editorial Board — 1935
ON the morning of Sunday, February 24, there was organized at Atlantic City a society for the study of education in its social relations. General announcement was made at the afternoon meeting held under the auspices of THE SOCIAL FRONTIER. Here is a development in which all of our readers should be interested.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE meeting of the Department of Superintendence in Atlantic City during the last week of February has been described by some observers as the most notable in the history of the Department. Without subscribing completely to this appraisal, mainly because we have not attended all the meeting of this body, we venture the opinion that the 1935 convention will be long remembered by tie student of American education.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE high point of the official program of the superintendents was reached on Tuesday morning in the panel discussion of the yearbook on Social Change and Education. Some qualification of the review of this volume which appeared in the March issue of THE SOCIAL FRONTIER should therefore be made. Whatever its inherent merits as an exposition of the subject, it certainly served in this session to challenge the thinking of a large body of the school men of the country.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THERE was one issue that overshadowed all others at Atlantic City. It was the issue of freedom of teaching. This was the question that the educators talked about when they met in small groups in the lobbies, the rooms, and the dining halls of the hotels. And it was the question that most of them were very silent about when they stood before the public. The issue had been brought to a head by the nationwide effort of the Hearst press to muzzle instruction and throw fear into the hearts of all teachers possessing ideas or sentiments ever so slightly tinged with liberalism.

The Editorial Board — 1935
WHY are liberal and progressive educators indignant over the Hearst press? Wherein lies its menace to the advancement of American civilization? The answer may be found in the applications which the Prophet of San Simeon has made of two decisively creditable insights about the purpose and function of the daily newspaper

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE futility of much current thinking about education is well illustrated by an editorial in THE NATION of March 13th entitled "Propaganda and the Schools." After a few half-hearted tributes to the positive achievements at the recent meeting of the Department of Superintendence at Atlantic City, the editorial goes on to declare that THE NATION is against using education to impart specific social ideas to the youth of the country.

The Editorial Board — 1935
IT is time that educators, especially the more advanced thinkers on all levels of the profession, begin to make capital out of the patent fact that education properly conducted in the modern world, is an enemy and not a benign supporter of inherited ways of doing things. Education in its profoundest meaning is revolution.

The Editorial Board — 1935
ALL too frequently has the distinction been drawn between freedom and collectivism. It is a false distinction based on a conception of freedom devoid of social content and of general human significance. It is, moreover, a harmful distinction which can only serve to prolong the existing lag between human needs in a techno' logical civilization and the present economic institutions. For it is only by a transfer of ownership and control of the wealth-producing resources of the nation to the vast masses who are engaged in intellectual and physical labor that a genuinely free and democratic life can be created.

The Editorial Board — 1935
IMPLICIT in the structure and operation of industrial society in America is a system of education integrated on a national scale. As technology advances and makes of the entire country one closely interdependent economic and cultural unit, local and state boundaries mean less and less in the life of the people.

The Editorial Board — 1935
IT is well-known that, except in the rural districts and counties, the board controlling public education in the United States is drawn from a small segment of the population. This is true of city boards and state boards, as well of the special boards directing the policies of higher institutions. The public schools are overwhelmingly in the hands of the property-owning classes and their retainers.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE liberal superintendent of schools occupies a strategic position in American life in these uncertain years. His contribution to the solution of our difficult educational and social problems is unique and invaluable, and in the end may well prove to have been the most important service that could have been rendered by educators in this period.

The Editorial Board — 1935
ON the eve of the 1935 convention of the Department of Superintendence it seems entirely appropriate to examine the validity of the Department's claim to educational leadership. If it be granted that education is an art concerned with the transformation of life as we find it into life as we would like it, then no educational leader-lip is possible unless accompanied by a realistic understanding of the forces underlying contemporary society and by the definite projection of goals for a future and better arrangement of American economic, institutional, and cultural life.

The Editorial Board — 1935
WHEN a sensitive foreign educator was visiting America a few years ago, he remarked that the most amazing thing about American education, as he had observed it in all parts of the country, was the all-pervasive influence of the school administrator. As he saw it, American schools appeared to be running a mad race toward some mystic administrative goal.

The Editorial Board — 1935
REPEATEDLY THE SOCIAL FRONTIER has spoken of the potential power of the teaching profession and has proposed that the school accept the challenge of history to share in the creation of the type of human society rendered necessary by technology and based on human values. This journal is by no means unmindful, however, of the present mentality of the average teacher.

The Editorial Board — 1935
BECAUSE no “man on horseback” has yet appeared, an influential leader of American youth, speaking before six hundred of them, dismissed the fear of fascism as though it were little more than “seein’ things at night.” Is he right in this, or is he asleep? Teachers should know.

The Editorial Board — 1935
MANY of our readers perhaps will wonder why the present issue of THE SOCIAL FRONTIER is devoted so largely to William Randolph Hearst. The answer to this question is to be found in three directions. In the first place, no attack upon freedom of teaching in American schools should go unnoticed and unchallenged.

The Editorial Board — 1935
DURING the past five years public education has had a difficult time. The school term has been shortened in many states, the offerings of the curriculum have been curtailed, the budget for physical equipment has been pruned, the size of classes has been enlarged, the teaching load has been increased, the salaries of teachers have been reduced, the school has actually been closed in many an American community, and in general the educational opportunities of the rising generation have been contracted during these years of economic disaster.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE prize for the most original thinking in 1933 and 1934 should go to the die-hard majority of the American publishers. These stalwarts deserve recognition for their novel interpretation of the meaning of the freedom of the press and their odd notion of the purposes this time-honored ideal of democracy should serve. Naive Americans during many generations were wont to think that freedom of the press describes a state of affairs where competent persons are free to present in printed form facts, which they consider true and significant, opinions they think valid, and programs of action they deem promising.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE press as represented in the daily newspaper is clearly the continuing primer of the populace. Perused, day in and day out, by all elements and classes of American’s, it is basic in forming the core of local, national, and international information, which is held in common by everybody. Upon the news and the data gleaned from the daily paper general opinions, fundamental attitudes, and social ideals are built.

The Editorial Board — 1935
THE SOCIAL FRONTIER is anxious to know what stand the American Federation of Labor takes upon the issue of academic freedom.

The Editorial Board — 1935
WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST is again riding a “Red” scare. This time he has selected as the objects of his attacks all teachers and students in universities and colleges who dare to examine critically the contemporary social situation and who believe that social change demands reconstruction of political and economic institutions.

The Editorial Board — 1935
AS this issue of THE SOCIAL FRONTIER reaches its readers, America is being treated to another of the periodic onslaughts of newspaper spectacularity, which are made possible by "freedom of the press" under modern conditions of ownership and control for private profit. A little town in New Jersey basks in the sunshine of prosperity provided by a tragic occurrence nearly three years ago in the family of the most famous young American of his day—Charles A. Lindbergh.

The Editorial Board — 1935
A NEW generation of American youth has grown to adolescence since the end of the World War. We Americans of the generation, which participated in that war, have not kept the faith with our dead. The freshness of the resolutions we then made to one another, that war must never occur again, faded out as civilian pursuits occupied more and more fully the center of our attention.

The Editorial Board — 1935
ACCORDING to the Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1,105,921 persons were teaching in the schools and colleges of the country in 1910. Thus every forty-fifth gainfully employed person in the nation was engaged in teaching. Here is a fact of far-reaching social significance— a fact whose meaning has been fully grasped neither by society at large nor by the teaching profession. Indeed, one might say, less by the latter than by the former.

The Editorial Board — 1935
IN inviting the contributors to this issue to set down their views on indoctrination, THE SOCIAL FRONTIER was not merely attempting to elicit a discussion on the abstract issue, to indoctrinate or not to indoctrinate. It has rather utilized the issue of indoctrination as a point of departure for the clarification of the primary tasks, which confront the educational profession today.

The Editorial Board — 1935
IF THE SOCIAL FRONTIER were merely a journal of educational discussion, it would rest satisfied with the presentation of the challenging and stimulating articles printed in the foregoing pages. But it more than an organ for the assembling of diverse ides and opinions; it is a journal of educational criticism and reconstruction: it is an instrument for the positive fashioning of programs and philosophies. To be sure, as the present issue clearly demonstrates, it opens its columns to the vigorous and untrammeled exposition of any reasoned point of view on problems relevant to the age. Yet it is under obligation to develop and to state its own position without equivocation on every subject it treats.

The Editorial Board — 1934

The Editorial Board — 1934
THE daily press on November 15th carried a dispatch from Washington starting that MR. Robert Fechner, director of the Civilian Conservation Corps, had barred from the camps under his charge a fifty-five page pamphlet entitled You and Machines, prepared by Professor William F. Ogburn of the University of Chicago and sponsored by the United States Office of Education. The pamphlet was barred on the grounds that its contents were too pessimistic in tone. Inquiry reveals Mr. Fechner to be utterly incompetent to pass judgment on this matter.

The Editorial Board — 1934
“THE schools must follow, not lead. They must reflect opinion, not create it.” This is the gist of the counsel offered by educators afflicted with indifference or a more or less veiled hostility to any basic change. The fact is that few educators today are comparable in courage of conviction and clarity of thought with certain influential youth groups. In September of this year more than six hundred young men and women of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as”National Council of Methodist Youth", worked together for four days to help plan the church's work for young people throughout the country. Their report of proceedings is an attractive booklet* with very plain speaking on important matters.

The Editorial Board — 1934
THE appointment of Superintendent Willard Givens of the Oakland public schools as Secretary of the National Education Association gives encouragement to all forward-looking members of the educational profession. The Board of Trustees is to be commended for this appointment.

The Editorial Board — 1934
THE returns of the recent national election suggest that the American people have struck their tents and are once more on the march. But how far they are to travel and to what destination is a question that remains unanswered. Possibly, like a man lost in a blizzard on the western plains, they will move in circles and arrive nowhere, gradually dissipating their energies and eventually giving up the struggle from complete exhaustion. Certainly the American people themselves have no clear sense of direction, if indeed they are aware of being in motion.

The Editorial Board — 1934
IT is an important function of the educational profession to clarify the meaning of those ideas that ostensibly constitute the basis of our national traditions and institutions. To this proposition few would take exception. Even self-proclaimed patriots would readily assent to it. Somewhat more daring, but in fact incapable of frightening any but the fossilized, is the view that it is a legitimate function of education to re-interpret national ideals in the light of the changing context of group life. Yet axiomatic as these propositions appear, the active application of them might well have profound social consequences.

The Editorial Board — 1934
THE SOCIAL FRONTIER has used the word collectivism in its pages. It has even taken the position, in harmony with the conclusions of the Commission on Social Studies of the American Historical Association, that “the age of individualism and laissez faire in economy and government is closing and a new age of collectivism is emerging”. This has disturbed those conservative elements in society who cherish their special privileges above all else.

The Editorial Board — 1934
FIRST in importance among the tasks, which face American teachers, is the achievement of genuine academic freedom. Moreover, the logic of unfolding events both within and outside the school will increase the significance of this task and intensify the issues clustering about it. Already signs of an impending struggle for such status of the educational profession as would enable it to discharge its responsibilities in this crucial period of our national history is becoming visible. Likewise visible is the tightening of the lines for the battle, which seems to be impending.

The Editorial Board — 1934
OUTSIDE of the borders of America, the recrudescence of tribal nationalism, preparations for the coming war, flight from reason, and the attempt to' bar the doors against any effort to create a freer cultural and economic life are making rapid headway. Mussolini states that, "Fascism conceives life as a struggle" and proceeds to convert Italian education into a Spartan discipline for what he considers an inevitable war. Germany is rapidly being transformed from a great nation contributing signally to the enrichment of world culture, into an isolated tribe, repudiating "shallow intellectualism" in favor of a "mysticism of blood".

The Editorial Board — 1934
TEACHERS should know that during the past years a powerful ferment has been working among the newspapermen and women of the country. The result is a nationwide organization, called the American Newspaper Guild, which now reaches into one hundred cities and enrolls not far from one-third of those who contribute directly to the editorial output of daily and weekly news' papers—reporters, departmental editors, copyreaders, photographers, artists, feature writers, and others.

The Editorial Board — 1934
THE most important single educational appointment of the decade will be, beyond question, the selection of a new general secretary of the National Education Association. This post is, potentially, the most strategic position in American education in the present critical period, potentially of far greater importance than the presidency of any university no matter how ancient and dignified

The Editorial Board — 1934
THE SOCIAL FRONTIER acknowledges allegiance to no narrow conception of education. While recognizing the school as society’s central educational agency, it refuses to limit itself to a consideration of the work of this institution. On the contrary, it includes within its field of interest all of those formative influences and agencies which serve to induct the individual—whether old or young—into the life and culture of the group. It regards education as an aspect of a culture in process of evolution. It therefore has no desire to promote a restricted and technical professionalism. Rather does it address itself to the task of considering the broad role of education in advancing the welfare and interest of the great massed of the people who do the work of society—those who labor on arms and ships and in the mines, shops, and factories of the world.

The Editorial Board — 1934
IN TRANSFORMING the plane of social living from insecurity, from chaos to planning, from the private profit audit to that of collective utility, from the lurid contrast of vulgar luxury and dire want to the shared abundant life made possible by technological advance, an organized educational profession can play an important role.

The Editorial Board — 1934
ON AUGUST 10, 1934, Governor Lehman of New York signed the Ives bill. In view of the fact that the bill affects directly the work and status of the teacher and is not unlike legislative measures pending or enactments in force in a number of American states, THE SOCIAL FRONTIER is convinced that the profession should lose no time in developing a policy with respect to legislation of this character. The future may see much more of it.

The Editorial Board — 1934
THE INCREASING NUMBER of cases in which teachers are hindered by Tory pressure from performing their full duty as teachers and as citizens calls for immediate and vigorous action by educational organizations. On the last day of July 1934, James M. Shields, for a dozen years a successful principal in the public schools of Winston-Salem, N. C., received word that he had not been re-elected.

The Editorial Board — 1934
The apparent general unconcern about the one social ideal to which teachers have always been consciously loyal, namely Democracy, is the most shocking phenomenon of all. Must they really choose between Communism and Fascism? In the academic year now upon them the obligation to ask searching questions and to observe in strict seriousness the movement of events and opinion is fundamental to the crystallization of intelligent loyalties.

 
Author Index
Jump to lastname starting with:
A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
A.Boyce, George
A.Hanson, Abel
Aagaard, Lola
Abbate, Fred J.
Abbe, George
Abbot, Julia W.
Abbott, Allan
Abbott, Daniel H.
Abbott, Dorothy
Abbott, Forest L.
Abbott, Herbert V.
Abbott, Mary Allen
Abbott, Mary Ellen
Abbs, Peter
Abdi, Ali A.
Abdus-Sabur, Qadir
Abedi, Jamal
Abel, David A.
Abel, Emily K.
Abel, Jerian
Abel, Yolanda
Abeles, Harold F.
Abelmann, Nancy
Abelson, Harold H.
Aben, Patricia
Abernathy, Ruth
Abernathy, Scott F.
Abeson, Alan
Abney, Louise
Abo-Zena, Mona
Aboulafia, Mitchell
Abowitz, Kathleen Knight
Abrahams, Frank
Abrahams, Salie
Abram, Percy
Abrams, Alfred W.
Abrams, Lisa
Abrams, Samuel E.
Abrams, Sandra Schamroth
Abramson, David A.
Abrego, Michelle
Abry, Tashia
Abu El-Haj, Thea
Acharya, Urmila
Achenbach, Thomas M.
Achilles, Charles M.
Achinstein, Betty
Achner, M. J.
Ackerman, Debra
Ackerman, John M.
Ackerman, Phillip L.
Ackerman, Winona B.
Acosta, Elda
Acosta, Melanie M.
Acosta, Rudy
Acosta , Vasthi Reyes
Acuff, Bette
Ada, Alma Flor
Adair, Jennifer Keys
Adair, Vivyan C.
Adam, Roy
Adamany, David
Adams, Arlene
Adams, Arthur S.
Adams, Curt M.
Adams, Donald
Adams, Hazard
Adams, Kathy
Adams, Kenneth R.
Adams, Margaret
Adams, Megan
Adams, Natalie Guice
Adams, Susan R.
Adamson, Susan C.
Adelson, Joseph
Adely, Fida J.
Adkins, Amee
Adkins, Dorothy C.
Adkins, Winthrop D.
Adkison, Judith
Adler, Chaim
Adler, Karlyn
Adler, Mortimer J.
Adler, Susan Matoba
Ado, Kathryn
af Malmborg, Nils M.
Afzal, Saima
Agans, Jennifer P.
Agee, Jane
Agirdag, Orhan
Agius, Kirsten
Agne, Russell M.
Agnew, Walter D.
Agosto, Vonzell
Agre, Gene P.
Agren, Raymond
Aguiar, Jeff
Aguilar, Jose V.
Aguilera-Black Bear, Dorothy
Aguirre, Julia
Aguirre Jr, Adalberto
Ahearn, Amy
Ahern, T. James
Ahern, Terence
Ahlberg, Mauri
Ahlstrom, Winton M.
Ahmad, Iftikhar
Ahmad, Nabeel
Ahn, June
Ahram, Roey
Ahrens, Maurice R.
Aiken, Henry David
Aiken-Wisniewski, Sharon A
Aikin, Wilford M.
Aikins, Ross
Airasian, Peter W.
Airton, Lee
Aitchison, Alison E.
Aitchison, Gertrude M.
Aitken, Graeme
Aitken, Jenny
Aitken, Johanna
aka Don Trent Jacobs, Four Arrows
Akanbi , Linda
Akers, Milton E.
Akerson, Valarie L.
Akiba, Daisuke
Akiba, Motoko
Akin, Clayton
Akinrinola, Ademola
Akita, Kiyomi
Akkari, Abdeljalil
Akom, Antwi
Akrawi, Matta
Al Atiyat , Ibtesam
Alarcon, Jeannette
Alatis, James E.
Alba, Richard
Albert, Gerald
Albert, Marta K.
Alberty, H. B.
Alberty, Harold
Albrecht, Arthur E.
Albrecht, Lisa
Albright, Julie M.
Albright, Kathy Zanella
Alcantar, Cynthia M.
Aldemir, Jale
Alden, Elizabeth
Alden, Vernon R.
Alderfer, H.F.
Aldrich, Grace L.
Alessi, Jr., Samuel J.
Alexander, Carter
Alexander, Dameon V.
Alexander, Francie
Alexander, Gadi
Alexander, Herbert B.
Alexander, Jonathan
Alexander, Karl L.
Alexander, Leslie
Alexander, Nathan N.
Alexander, Neville
Alexander, Nicola A.
Alexander, Patricia A.
Alexander, Theron
Alexander, Thomas
Alexander, W. P.
Alexander, William M.
Alexander, M.D., Franz
Alfonso, Mariana
Alford, Harold D.
Alford, Schevaletta M.
Alfred, Mary
Alger, Chadwick F.
Alharthi, Ahmad A.
Ali-Khan, Carolyne
Alibutod, Marilyn
Alicea, Monica
Alishahi, Afsoon
Alkin, Marvin C.
Allegrante, John P.
Alleman, Janet
Allen, Anna-Ruth
Allen, Arthur
Allen, Ayana
Allen, C. R.
Allen, Clinton M.
Allen, Danielle
Allen, David
Allen, Forrest
Allen, Harvey A.
Allen, Ira Madison
Allen, Jan
Allen, Jane C.
Allen, Jennifer
Allen, Keisha McIntosh
Allen, R. V.
Allen, Richard D.
Allen, Tawannah G.
Allen, Virginia F.
Allen, W. Paul
Allen, Walter R.
Allen, Wendell C.
Allen, Willard Paul
Allen-Jones , Glenda L.
Allensworth, Elaine
Alleyne, Melissa L.
Alline, Anna L.
Allington, Richard
Allison, Valerie A.
Allport, Gordon W.
Allyn, David
Almack, John C.
Almeda, Victoria Q.
Almog, Tamar
Almy, Millie
Alonso, Harriet Hyman
Alonzo, Julie
Alpern, D. K.
Alperstein , Janet F.
Alpert, Augusta
Alridge, Derrick P.
Alsaedi, Najah
Alsbury, Thomas L.
Alson, Allan
Alston, Chandra
Altbach, Philip G.
Althouse, J.G.
Altman, James W.
Altman, William
Alvermann, Donna E.
Alviar-Martin, Theresa
Alvy, Harvey B.
Amanti, Cathy
Ambach, Gordon M.
Ambrosio, John
Ames, Carole A.
Amonette, Henry L.
Amory, Alan
Amrein-Beardsley, Audrey
Amsel, Eric
Amster, Jeanne E.
Amthor, Ramona Fruja
An, Sohyun
Anagnostopoulos , Dorothea
Anastasi, Anne
Ancess, Jacqueline
and Associates,
And His Students,
and others,
and others,
and others,
Anderegg, David
Anderman, Lynley H.
Anders, Patricia
Andersen, C. T.
Andersen, Erik A.
Andersen, Neil
Anderson, Archibald W.
Anderson, Barry D.
Anderson, Bernice E.
Anderson, Brett
Anderson, C. Arnold
Anderson, Celia Rousseau
Anderson, Celia M.
Anderson, G. Lester
Anderson, Gary L.
Anderson, Gina
Anderson, Gregory M.
Anderson, Haithe
Anderson, Harold A.
Anderson, Helen
Anderson, Homer W.
Anderson, Howard R.
Anderson, James D.
Anderson, James
Anderson, Jeffrey B.
Anderson, Jervis
Anderson, John E.
Anderson, Kate T.
Anderson, Kelly
Anderson, Kenneth Alonzo
Anderson, L. Dewey
Anderson, Lauren
Anderson, Lorin W.
Anderson, Michael L.
Anderson , Noel S.
Anderson, O. Rober
Anderson, Richard E.
Anderson, Richard C.
Anderson, Robert H.
Anderson, Rodino F.
Anderson, Rowland C.
Anderson, Roy N.
Anderson, Sir George
Anderson, Thomas H.
Anderson, W. P.
Anderson-Thompkins, Sibby
Andic, Martin
André, Aline B.
Andreescu, Titu
Andrei, Elena
Andress, Paul
Andrew, Thomas
Andrews, Alon
Andrews, Benjamin R.
Andrews, Gillian "Gus"
Andrews, Richard L.
Andrews-Larson, Christine
Andrianaivo, Solange
Andrus, Ruth
Andry, Robert C.
Andrzejewski, Carey E.
Angelis, Janet
Angoff, Charles
Angulo, A. J.
Angus, David L.
Annamma, Subini
Annenberg, Norman
Ansari, Sana
Ansell, Amy E.
Anthony, Albert S.
Anthony, Kate S.
Antia , Shirin
Antler, Joyce
Antler, Stephen
Antonelli, George A.
Antrop-González, René
Anyon, Jean
Aoudé, Ibrahim G.
Apfel, Nancy
Appell, Clara T.
Appiah, Kwame Anthony
Apple, Michael W.
Applebaum, Barbara
Applebee, Arthur N.
Appleman, Deborah
Aptheker, Herbert
Apugo , Danielle L.
Aquino-Sterling, Cristian
Araaya, Hailu
Arafeh, Sousan
Arbeit, Miriam R.
Arberg, Harold W.
Arbuckle, Dugald
Archibald, Sarah
Arcilla, Rene Vincente
Ardsdale, May B.
Areen, Judith
Arenas, Alberto
Arends, Jack
Arent, Emma
Ares, Nancy
Arey, Charles K.
Argyris, Chris
Arias, M. Beatriz
Arisman, Kenneth J.
Arlett, Elizabeth
Armbruster, Bonnie B.
Armentrout, W.D.
Armor, David J.
Arms, Emily
Armstrong, Denise E.
Armstrong, John A.
Armstrong, Louis W.
Armstrong, Willis C.
Arndt, C. O.
Arnesen, Arthur E.
Arnett, Alex Mathews
Arnheim, Rudolf
Arnold, David B.
Arnold, Katharine S.
Arnold, Noelle Witherspoon
Arnot, Madeleine
Arnspiger, V. C.
Arnstein, George E.
Arnstine, Barbara
Arnstine, Donald J.
Arntsine, Barbara
Aronowitz, Stanley
Arons, Stephen
Aronson, Brittany
Arrastia, Lisa
Arrington, Angelique Renee
Arrington, Ruth E.
Arrowsmith, Mary Noel
Arroyo, Andrew T.
Arsenian, Seth
Arseo, Sean
Arshad, Rosnidar
Arshavsky, Nina
Artelt , Cordula
Artiles, Alfredo J.
Arzubiaga, Angela E.
Asby, Sir Eric
Asch, Adrienne
Aschbacher, Pamela R.
Ascher, Abraham
Ascher, Carol
Ash, Doris
Ashbaugh, Ernest J.
Ashby, Christine
Ashby, Lloyd W.
Ashcom, Banjamin M.
Ashcraft, Catherine
Asheim, Lester
Asher, Nina
Ashford, Shetay N.
Ashida, K.
Ashley, Dwayne
Ashmore, Jerome
Ashton, Patricia E.
Ashworth, Delmer
Asil, Mustafa
Asimeng-Boahene, Lewis
Askeland, O.
Assouline, Susan G.
Assow, A. Harry
Assuncao Flores, Maria
Astelle, George E.
Aster, Samuel
Astin, Helen S.
Astin, John A.
Astor, Ron Avi
Astuto, Terry A.
Ata, Atakan
Atanda, Awo Korantemaa
Athanases, Steven Z.
Atherley, Marilyn
Atkin, J. Myron
Atkinson, Ruth V.
Attannucci, Jane S.
Atteberry, Allison
Attwood, Adam
Atwater, Mary
Atwater, Sheri
Atwell, Nancie
Atwell, Robert King
Atwood, Virginia Rogers
Atyco, Henry C.
Au, Wayne
Aubert, Adrianna
Aubrey, Roger F.
Audley-Piotrowski, Shannon
Auerbach, Susan
Auguste, Byron
Aultman, Lori
Aurini, Janice
Auser, Cortland P.
Austin, Ann E
Austin, David B.
Austin, Duke W.
Austin, Glenn
Austin, Jean
Austin, Mary C.
Austin, Mike
Austin, Theresa
Austin, Vance
Ausubel, David P.
Autin, David B.
Avalos, Mary A.
Avcioglu, Ilhan
Averch, Harvey
Averill, Hugh M.
Averill, Julia
Averill, W. A.
Avila, JuliAnna
Avila, Maria
Avila Saiter, Sean M.
Aviles, Ann M.
Avison, O. R.
Axelrod, Paul
Axelrod, Ysaaca
Axelson, Alfhild J.
Axline, Virginia M.
Axtelle, G. E.
Ayala, Jennifer
Ayalon, Hanna
Ayer, Adelaide M.
Ayer, Fred C.
Ayers , Bill
Ayers, David
Ayers, Leonard P.
Ayers, Richard
Ayers, Rick
Ayers, William
Ayieko, Rachel
Azevedo, Roger
Azzam, Tarek
 
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