Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements
Articles
by Dennis Barr, Beth Boulay, Robert Selman, Rachel McCormick, Ethan Lowenstein, Beth Gamse, Melinda Fine & M. Brielle Leonard — 2015
This article reports on a randomized controlled experiment examining the impact of a professional development intervention that helps teachers foster students’ historical thinking skills, social and ethical reflection, and civic learning.

by Stephen Quaye — 2014
In this article, I examine the experiences of 22 postsecondary educators facilitating dialogues about racial issues in classroom settings. Findings reveal four main strategies participants employed: using group work and discussions, incorporating an integrated assortment of resources, inviting students to apply racial concepts to their lives, and having learners debrief following each dialogue session.

by Desirée Baolian Qin & Eun-Jin Han — 2014
Drawing on longitudinal interview data collected on 72 Chinese immigrant children and their parents, we examined how immigration reshapes parental involvement in mostly working-class Chinese immigrant families. Our findings include multiple challenges parents face after migration in school involvement, parental feelings of powerlessness, and children’s forced precocious independence.

by Wayne Au & Joseph Ferrare — 2014
Using social network analysis, critical policy studies, and literacy theory, this study analyzes the network of policy actors involved in the campaign to pass a charter school initiative in the state of Washington. This study finds that through a combination individual donations and the support to key local organizations provided by their affiliated philanthropic organizations, a small group of wealthy individuals leveraged a disproportionate amount of influence over the direction and outcome of the charter school initiative in the state of Washington, particularly relative to the average Washington voter.

by Emery Petchauer — 2014
This two-year qualitative study used the theoretical constructs of identity contingencies and situational cues to explore the experiences of 22 African American preservice teachers in their teacher licensure testing events. Findings illustrate that race can become a salient dimension of the testing event through (a) interactions with test proctors and site administrators and (b) actions of other test takers that inadvertently cue racial stereotypes and judgments.

by Alan Daly, Nienke Moolenaar, Claudia Der-Martirosian & Yi-Hwa Liou — 2014
In this study we use a human and social capital framework to explore the relationship between teachers’ social interactions and student achievement on an interim benchmark assessment. We test our hypothesis about the effects of human and social capital on student achievement using social network analysis and hierarchical linear modeling.

by Sydney Freeman Jr. & Marybeth Gasman — 2014
This study captures the background characteristics of HBCU leaders in order to lay the groundwork for future studies on HBCU presidents. It also seeks to understand the role these leaders play in grooming and mentoring the next generation of HBCU leaders.

by Bruce Kimball — 2014
Comprehensive, multi-year mass fundraising campaigns in American higher education began with the Harvard Endowment Fund (HEF) drive, which extended from 1915 to 1925. Based on the first thorough study of the archival records, this essay reveals that the campaign established novel features of university fundraising through contentious negotiations among conflicting groups, prompted the university administration to centralize and control alumni affairs and development efforts for the first time, and, above all, introduced today’s ubiquitous episodic pattern of continuous fundraising, in which mass comprehensive campaigns alternate with discrete solicitations of wealthy donors, whose dominant roles have never changed.

by Toni Rogat, Shelly Witham & Clark Chinn — 2014
Our purpose is to enrich current conceptualizations of autonomy support that remain constrained by the context of study and by the limited available descriptions of teacher enactment. Toward this end, we richly describe teachers’ provision of academically significant autonomy support within an inquiry-based science curricular context to incorporate higher quality differentiations.

by James Spillane & Lauren Anderson — 2014
This manuscript explores novice school principals’ efforts to make sense of their new occupation immediately following their boundary passage into the principalship.

by — 2014

by Michael Gottfried, Robert Bozick & Sinduja Srinivasan — 2014
This study examines the relationship between applied STEM coursetaking (i.e., ‘scientific research & engineering’ and ‘information technology’) in high school and standardized math achievement. Using longitudinal data from a nationally-representative cohort of high school students, this study tests the effect of enrolling in applied STEM courses conditional on pipeline placement in traditional academic math courses, with the former emphasizing the application of concepts taught in the latter to specific occupational settings. Fixed effects regression analyses reveal that applied STEM courses have a statistically significant, but substantively small positive effect on math test scores. Students who fall lower on the math ability pipeline (i.e., who take only below average math courses like basic math and pre-Algebra) benefit much more from applied STEM courses than do students who take more advanced courses.

by Srikala Naraian — 2014
This paper reviews data from multiple sites to disclose teachers’ practices at the confluence of multiple discourses that collectively construct inclusion in uncertain terms. It suggests that teacher agency for inclusion is situated within the contradictions of everyday schooling practice and offers a framing of inclusion that is grounded in such conditions.

by Laura Bray, Alicia Mrachko & Christopher Lemons — 2014
In this qualitative case study, we examined the writing opportunities provided to students in four eighth-grade English classrooms at a full inclusion middle school.

by Drew Gitomer, Courtney Bell, Yi Qi, Daniel McCaffrey, Bridget Hamre & Robert Pianta — 2014
Using an observation protocol designed to measure classroom interactions, we find that the quality of instructional and emotional support in algebra classrooms is much weaker than classroom organization. These differences parallel observers’ relative strengths and weaknesses in reliably evaluating practice. Our finding that certain aspects of teaching are carried out better than others and observed with more consistency has implications for the evaluation and improvement of teaching.

by Min Sun, Anne Garrison Wilhelm, Christine Larson & Kenneth Frank — 2014
This study examines how middle school teachers’ networks influence their mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) and instructional practices. We also examined how mathematics coaches’ expertise, in the form of MKT, plays a role in augmenting the extent to which teachers learn through interacting with close colleagues. Drawing on longitudinal data from a larger NSF-funded project that has worked with 29 middle schools in four large, urban districts, we used multilevel linear models with cross-level interaction effects and in-depth sensitivity analyses of the effects of close colleagues and coaches. Our results show that changes in teachers’ instructional practice were positively related to their access to instructional expertise through interactions with close colleagues. But we did not find a similar significantly positive association between changes in teachers’ MKT and access to their close colleagues’ MKT expertise. Rather, coaches’ MKT expertise positively moderated the extent to which teachers learned MKT from their close colleagues through seeking advice on teaching mathematics; that is, having an expert coach in the school enhanced the MKT learning opportunities that teachers had from interacting with close colleagues. Results from this study shed light on how to support teachers’ on-the-job learning and successfully implement ambitious instructional reforms in schools.

by Sara Levy — 2014
This qualitative case study examines how students understand and identify with histories with which they have a heritage connection when they learn about the histories from multiple, possibly conflicting, sources: their families and the formal public school curriculum.

by Arlo Kempf — 2014
This article examines the way Cuban teachers address racism in their professional practice, with a specific focus on teacher home visits to address issues of racism with parents and guardians. Using critical race theory and a reconsideration of the ecological systems theory, this article analyzes the relationship between Cuban teachers and the families of students they teach based on in-depth interviews and a survey of Cuban teachers.

by Ebony McGee — 2014
In this article the author explores the mathematics and life experiences of 13 Black elementary education pre-service college students, encompassing both their reflections as students of mathematics and as future mathematics teachers of most likely Black and Latino students. Their “voices” suggest that these Black pre-service students generated constructions that include considerations of race and racism as part of their shared African American experience in the United States; that is, a mathematics learning experience and future mathematics-based teaching ideologies structured, in part, by larger negative and unjust race relations existing in US culture, in spite of early at-home mathematics support.

by Alejandro Covarrubias & Daniel Liou — 2014
After decades of research that repudiates the thesis of Asian Americans as model minorities, the visibility of Asian Americans in higher education continues to reinforce essentialist paradigms about their presumed success. This article presents the most recent educational pipeline for Asian Americans while examining disparities in attainment across race, class, gender, citizenship, and earning power as a method to further policy discussions on education and civil rights.

by Melinda Karp & Rachel Bork — 2014
This article draws interview data from three community colleges in Virginia to articulate the largely unspoken expectations, behaviors, and attitudes to which community college students must adhere if they are to be successful.

by Marilyn Cochran-Smith, Fiona Ell, Larry Ludlow, Lexie Grudnoff & Graeme Aitken — 2014
This article examines the challenges and promises of complexity theory as a theoretical framework for teacher education research.

by Robert Ream, James Lewis, Begoña Echeverria & Reba Page — 2014
How do we account for the persistent difficulty the u.s. community of science has in educating larger numbers of talented and diverse undergraduates? We argue that the problem lies in the community’s single-minded focus on scientific subject matter and individual motivation, to the profound neglect of social relations—particularly trust. Ee report a linked, two-part, longitudinal study: (i) structural models documenting a dialectic wherein trust bolsters motivation and achievement in science, particularly among traditionally underserved undergraduates enrolled in a supplemental, federally-funded program aimed at diversifying representation in science; and (ii) an evaluation documenting the federal program’s “added value” in promoting trust between diverse undergraduates and their university mentors. In sum, trust is measureable, producible in undergraduate science education, and matters, most particularly for students who are members of groups historically underrepresented in the sciences.

by Kadriye Ercikan & Wolff-Michael Roth — 2014
Commonly applied criteria for generalizing that focus on experimental design or representativeness of samples of the population of units neglect considering the diversity in the targeted populations of interest and uses of knowledge generated from the generalization. This paper (a) articulates the structure and discusses limitations of different forms of generalizations across the spectrum of quantitative and qualitative research; and it (b) argues for an overarching framework that includes population heterogeneity and uses of knowledge claims as part of the rationale for generalizations from educational research.

by Li-Ching Ho, Theresa Alviar-Martin & Enrique Leviste — 2014
This study of 35 social studies teachers in Singapore focuses on constraints to the teaching of controversial topics and the manner in which teachers navigate their personal beliefs amidst the evolving contours of public and official discourses. The findings illustrate how the state's power to define conventional values and demarcate the discursive spaces of teachers can both limit a teacher's capacity to discuss controversial topics in class and, paradoxically, provide more freedom for them to address controversy in the classroom.

Found 200
Displaying 1 to 25
<Back | Next>
Most E-mailed

Most Read
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS