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by Amanda Kibler, Allison Atteberry, Christine Hardigree & April Salerno — 2015
This mixed-methods study describes the changing social networks of adolescents participating in an extracurricular dual-language program.

by Muhammad Khalifa & Felecia Briscoe — 2015
The purpose of this autoethnography was to examine how school district-level administrators respond to investigations and findings of racism in their districts. We examined administrators’ responses to our requests about their districts’ racialized disciplinary data, and their responses to our sharing of these findings. We describe four technical–rational practices through which school district administrators maintain blindness toward racial inequities and thereby allow racism to continue in their districts.

by Anthony Peguero & Jennifer Bondy — 2015
Perceptions of justice, fairness, and order can influence pro-social behavior, psychological well-being, healthy interpersonal relationships, and educational progress and success for students. It is also known that students’ perceptions of school justice can vary by race, ethnicity, and gender. What remains uncertain is how the fastest-growing segment of the United States, students in immigrant families, perceive the school justice, fairness, and order within their school. This study utilizes data from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 and incorporates multilevel analysis to examine how students in immigrant families perceive justice, fairness, and order at their school. Findings do suggest that the students’ perceptions of justice, fairness, and order are indeed moderated by immigrant generation, race, ethnicity, and gender. The implications of the evident racial, ethnic, and gender, as well as generational, disparities in students’ perceptions of justice, fairness, and order in the United States school system are discussed more broadly.

by Jessica Pandya, Kathleah Pagdilao & Enok Kim — 2015
In this article, we explore the ways transnational children identified as certain kinds of transnational, immigrant, or “American” students, while they orchestrated multiple, often competing voices of in multimodal, digital autobiographies.

by Danah Henriksen & Punya Mishra — 2015
How do exemplary teachers incorporate creativity in their teaching? Through in-depth interviews with National Teacher of the Year award winners, this research aims to better understand their beliefs, interests, and practices involving creative teaching. Results identify key themes of how these teachers approach the creative process, as well as the connection between their personal interests and professional creativity.

by Mable Kinzie, Jessica Whittaker , Pat McGuire , Youngju Lee & Carolyn Kilday — 2015
We present the Research on Curricular Design (RCD) model and describe its use to design, develop, and test the efficacy of early childhood mathematics and science curricula. We share what was achieved with application of the RCD model and offer observations on the value of this approach for research on and development of educational products.

by Michael Gottfried & Morgan Polikoff — 2015
This research evaluates whether English Language Learner (ELL) classmates are associated with the social skills outcomes of students with disabilities in kindergarten. Using a national large-scale sample of kindergarten students, the results show that having a greater number of ELL classmates has a positive effect on the social skills outcomes for students with disabilities.

by Meredith Richards & Kori Stroub — 2015
In this study, we draw attention to the issue of attendance zone gerrymandering, the manipulation of school boundaries into irregular shapes that alter patterns of school attendance and, thereby, students' access to educational opportunities. Drawing on the literature on electoral gerrymandering, we outline a framework for conceptualizing and measuring the gerrymandering of educational boundaries. Using geospatial techniques, we provide initial empirical evidence on the severity and distribution of gerrymandering using a national sample of 23,945 attendance zones. We find that attendance zones are highly gerrymandered—nearly as much as congressional districts—and are becoming more gerrymandered over time. Findings underscore the racial and, to a lesser extent, socioeconomic character of gerrymandering, which is particularly acute in whiter and more affluent schools and in areas experiencing rapid racial change.

by Tina Trujillo & Kenneth Howe — 2015
Introduction to the special issue of Teachers College Record

by David Meens & Kenneth Howe — 2015
This article examines the NCLB Act and its underlying reform agenda of increased “accountability” and “choice” in light of its consequences for education policymaking and democratic education.

by Ben Kirshner & Antwan Jefferson — 2015
We synthesize scholarship about participatory democracy, youth–adult partnerships, and thirdspace in order to develop guiding principles for an inclusive and democratic approach to improving schools.

by Tina Trujillo & Michelle Renée — 2015
This article evaluates the tensions with democratic education inherent in the federal School Improvement Grant program’s market-based school reforms. The paper culminates in a set of recommendations that are intended to re-center the purposes of public education for low-income students, students of color, and local communities in developing more equitable, democratic school turnarounds.

by John Rogers, Chris Lubienski, Janelle Scott & Kevin Welner — 2015
This article tracks the emergence of parent trigger policies, considers the political and financial forces that have supported the parent trigger movement, and examines evidence concerning the potential of this approach for improving schools, empowering parents, and enhancing democracy.

by Thai-Huy Nguyen & Marybeth Gasman — 2015
This is a historical study of the formation and role of the Vietnamese student organizations at the University of California, Irvine from 1980 to 1990.

by Chandra Alston & Michelle Brown — 2015
This study investigated the intellectual challenge of typical writing tasks and the intellectual quality of student work in classrooms of higher and lower value-added middle school English language arts teachers to understand what value-added modeling might capture in terms of writing instruction.

by Craig Peck, Kimberly Hewitt, Carol Mullen, Carl Lashley, John Eldridge & Ty-Ron Douglas — 2015
This study explores how the confluence of promising instructional technology innovations and digitally driven youth culture affected the experiences of students in two southeastern United States high schools.

by Megan Holland — 2015
This article examines how students negotiate the “college-for-all” norm in two diverse, high-achieving high schools. The findings indicate that in these contexts, the norm was interpreted as “four-year college-for-all,” leading to the development of a stigma surrounding two-year community college attendance.

by Christy Galletta Horner, Tanner LeBaron Wallace & Matthew Bundick — 2015
This study explores youths’ perspectives on school-based emotional expression, emotional suppression, and emotion coaching in urban high schools.

by Tova Michalsky & Bracha Kramarski — 2015
The goal of this study was to examine how preservice science teachers may capitalize on learning from different types of reflection prompts based on the IMPROVE self-questioning model oriented toward technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) in order to enhance their design of technology-infused science lessons for students and to allow them to develop their own self-reflection abilities. Results indicated that preservice teachers who contemplated a combination of both judgment and modification reflections in treatment improved more in their lesson-design skills and in their self-reflection ability (of both types at the three phases), as compared with preservice teachers who contemplated only a single type of reflective prompt (generic or only judgment or modification).

by Kathleen Nolan — 2015
This article develops the concept and provides an illustrative portrait of teachers’ care-based resistance practices in the context of neoliberal school reform. Data presented come from a critical ethnographic study of policy enactment in an urban high school experiencing high levels of school reform.

by Amanda Datnow & Lea Hubbard — 2015
This article provides a review of literature on teachers’ use of assessment data to inform instruction. The article reviews research on the types assessment data teachers use to inform instruction, how teachers analyze data, and how their instruction is impacted. Although teachers are often asked to analyze data in a consistent way, agendas for data use, the nature of the assessments, and teacher beliefs all come into play, leading to variability in how they use data.

by Julie Marsh, Melanie Bertrand & Alice Huguet — 2015
Drawing on data collected in six middle schools, this article finds that coaches and professional learning communities (PLCs) played an important role in mediating teachers’ responses to data. We find that dialogue and the dynamic relationship between two types of expertise may help explain the ways in which PLCs and coaches facilitated deeper-level changes in pedagogy, and that school leadership and district-level context shaped the possibility for such changes.

by Ellen Mandinach , Jeremy Friedman & Edith Gummer — 2015
This article reports on a three-part study about how schools of education are preparing teacher candidates to use data effectively and responsibly. The study consisted of a survey to a nationally representative sample of schools of education, a review of select syllabi, and an examination of state licensure and certification requirements. This article provides a context for why schools of education can and must play an important role in preparing teachers to use data.

by Kim Schildkamp & Cindy Poortman — 2015
This study focuses on the factors influencing a professional development intervention for data-based decision making: the data team procedure. Data teams are teams of teachers and school leaders who collaboratively learn how to use data. In this article, we discuss how data characteristics (e.g., access to data), school organizational characteristics (e.g., shared goal), and individual/team characteristics (e.g., pedagogical content knowledge) influence the use of data in data teams, and how these factors are interrelated.

by Elizabeth Farley-Ripple & Joan Buttram — 2015
This paper explores the development of data use capacity in an elementary school through a social network approach. Findings reveal that data use networks are influenced by the larger professional structure of the school and may be productive in developing shared practices. This study illustrates several ways in which this approach can be valuable in understanding individual and school capacity for data use.

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