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by Wouter Schenke — 2017
In this article learning of school leaders, teachers, and researchers through boundary crossing in research and development projects in schools is examined and related to types of cross-professional collaboration.

by Li-Ching Ho — 2016
Even though multicultural education is constructed very differently and serves very different purposes in different national contexts, relatively little attention has been paid to how education systems of countries such as China and Singapore give greater emphasis to the concepts of harmony and social cohesion. Drawing on interviews with 24 Singapore social studies teachers, this study interrogates the concept of harmony, investigates the implications of the state incorporating this concept as an educational goal for the public education system, and examines the affordances and constraints of harmony as an educational goal.

by Jeffrey Harding, Maggie Parker & Rob Toutkoushian — 2016
This article provides secondary statistical analysis of data from New Hampshire regarding the timing of information and decision-making in the college choice process. Findings support providing information and guidance to students earlier than has been traditionally considered.

by Alex Bowers, Mark Blitz, Marsha Modeste, Jason Salisbury & Richard Halverson — 2017
This purpose of this study is investigate the existence and extent of significantly different subgroups of teacher and leader responses to the Comprehensive Assessment of Leadership for Learning (CALL) survey. CALL is web-based formative assessment of school leadership developed by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison employing the principles of distributed leadership and current research on leadership activities that promote student learning. Two-level Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was used to examine the extent to which there are different subgroups of teacher responders, how the subgroups compare with the responses of the leaders to CALL, and if there are significantly different types of school academic and leadership climates as defined by the CALL data. We find that there are three statistically significant different subgroups of teacher responders to CALL, Low (31.4%), Moderate (43.3%), and High (25.4%). In addition, these subgroups cluster non-randomly across three significantly different types of schools: schools with generally low leadership for learning (40.2%), schools with moderate leadership for learning (47.0%), and the smallest subgroup, schools with high leadership for learning (12.8%). These differences help to inform future theory and practice around CALL and school leadership for learning across the different teacher subgroup survey response patterns, and how those patterns relate to the responses of the leaders in their schools. As one example, in the high leadership for learning schools, teacher response patterns were the most closely aligned with the leader survey response patterns, in comparison with the other school and teacher subgroups, suggesting a congruent and aligned school academic climate between the teachers and the leaders, but only in the smallest subgroup of schools.

by Nicole Louie — 2017
Through investigation of two cases of close teacher engagement with equity-oriented practice and two cases of relatively low engagement, this paper highlights four types of resources that appear critical for supporting teacher learning.

by Christine Andrews-Larson, Jonee Wilson & Adrian Larbi-Cherif — 2017
In this article, the authors examine the focus and facilitation of teachers’ collaborative conversations in schools that exhibited growth in instructional quality. We identify differences in the ways facilitators ask questions and press teachers to elaborate on their contributions, and we argue that these differences are likely to be consequential for teachers’ professional learning.

by Michael Gottfried — 2017
This study examined whether differences in achievement and socioemotional outcomes were correlated with having attended center-based care before/after school during kindergarten for children with disabilities. Using a national dataset of kindergarten students from the 2010–2011 school year (ECLS-K:2011), this study finds that children with disabilities who attended center-based care before/after school during kindergarten had lower achievement and socioemotional outcomes. The findings were differentiated by type of disability classification.

by Sarah Kavanagh — 2016
This article reports findings from a comparative case study that examined how teachers who held strong intentions to support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) students facilitated classroom discourse about LGBTQ identity.

by Kevin Bastian, C. Kevin Fortner, Alisa Chapman, M. Jayne Fleener, Ellen McIntyre & Linda Patriarca — 2016
This article calls for the creation of partnerships between teacher preparation programs and researchers or state education agencies to share individual-level data on program graduates with teacher preparation programs.

by Jamie Colwell & David Reinking — 2016
This article examines the results of a ten-week formative experiment to investigate how eighth-grade history instruction could be aligned with literacy goals. We give specific focus to our collaboration with the history teacher and her implementation of an instructional intervention to scaffold students’ reading and analysis of historical texts.

by Srikala Naraian — 2016
To disrupt the stubborn linkage between place and disability, this paper takes up spatial theory to stimulate new understandings of inclusion. Drawing on teacher interview data from ethnographically-oriented studies conducted between 2005 and 2014 in U.S. public schools, it proposes an alternate conceptualization of student learning difference to enable new relations between teacher identity and place, making inclusion a spatially fluid project.

by Scott Seider, Daren Graves, Aaliyah El-Amin, Shelby Clark, Madora Soutter, Jalene Tamerat, Pauline Jennett, Kathryn Gramigna, Jennifer Yung, Megan Kenslea & Sherri Sklarwitz — 2016
The present study considered the role of progressive and no-excuses schooling models in fostering marginalized adolescents’ ability to analyze, navigate, and challenge the social forces and institutions contributing to race and class inequality.

by Xueli Wang — 2016
This study examines the relationship among transfer to four-year institutions of varying selectivity and a rich set of institutional, academic, and individual factors for a national sample of beginning community college students. Conceptually and methodologically, this research extends existing scholarship on transfer by taking into account the heterogeneity of receiving four-year institutions.

by Judy Marquez Kiyama, Donna Harris & Amalia Dache-Gerbino — 2016
This article illustrates how oppressive structures shape Latinas’ education experiences, specifically examining how systemic forces position and oppress Latinas, resulting in physical violence, stereotypes, and environmental violence. The Latina participants shared the survival and resistance strategies that they employed, illustrating the importance of further interrogating systems of violence against marginalized women of color in educational settings.

by Sharon Nichols & Felicia Castro-Villarreal — 2016

by Peter Martin — 2016
This article presents a longitudinal study of an urban charter middle school to examine the impact testing pressures can have on the education of students with disabilities and English language learners, and how this may lead to a narrowing of the content they are taught.

by Felicia Castro-Villarreal & Sharon Nichols — 2016
This article provides a general overview of educational policy and practice as it relates to special education student populations.

by Adai Tefera & Catherine Kramarczuk Voulgarides — 2016
This article critically examines the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and No Child Left Behind. Authors demonstrate how and why these policies have failed to adequately ensure that students of color with disabilities receive the educational opportunities the policies were intended to provide.

by Jeanette Joyce, Judith Harrison & Danielle Murphy — 2016
The purpose of this article is to discuss student learning objectives as components of high-stakes teacher evaluation systems, within the context of learners with special needs.

by Federico Waitoller & Barbara Pazey — 2016
This article examines the tensions that can materialize at the intersection of high-stakes accountability assessments and the rights of parents of students with dis/abilities.

by Jessica Bacon, Carrie Rood & Beth Ferri — 2016
This paper critically examines a resultant phenomenon of the Standards-Based Reform movement: the emergence of self-contained Prioritized Curriculum classes, designed to provide students with disabilities access to standards-based general education curriculum in segregated classes.

by Robert Cotto Jr. — 2016
Connecticut experienced two major changes in testing policy for children with disabilities that played a major role in conclusions about educational progress in the state. The responses to these changes in testing policy make Connecticut an illuminating case regarding the problem of high-stakes testing and changes in policies for students with disabilities in a state characterized by deep racial and economic inequity.

by Neal Kingston, Meagan Karvonen, Sue Bechard & Karen Erickson — 2016
The Dynamic Learning Maps™ Alternate Assessment is based on a different set of guiding principles than other assessments. In this article we describe its characteristics and look at the history of alternate assessment and the problems in implementing useful assessment programs for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

by George Theoharis, Julie Causton & Chelsea Tracy-Bronson — 2016
This article reports on a project to better understand how educators grapple with externally imposed pressures as they work to change the organizational structure of their schools to implement greater inclusion of their students served by special education.

by Todd Glover, Linda Reddy, Ryan Kettler, Alexander Kunz & Adam Lekwa — 2016
The accountability movement and high-stakes testing fail to attend to ongoing instructional improvements based on the regular assessment of student skills and teacher practices. The purpose of this article is to describe the School System Improvement Project’s hybrid approach to utilizing both formative and summative assessments to (a) inform decisions about effective instruction based on all students’ and teachers’ needs, and (b) guide high-stakes decisions about teacher effectiveness.

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