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by Kenneth Zeichner & Hilary Conklin — 2017
This paper analyzes how research has been misused in debates about the future of teacher education and offers several specific suggestions for improving the quality of this debate.

by Joseph Nelson — 2016
This study employs a relational teaching framework to examine the learning relationships among teachers and a full cohort of eighth-grade Black boys (N = 27) at a single-sex middle school for boys of color in New York City. In-depth interviews from a critical ethnography conducted at the school-site (during the 2011–2012 academic year) culled boys’ narratives of their teacher-student relationships, in order to illustrate how specific relational teaching strategies supported Black boys’ engagement and learning.

by Terry Flennaugh — 2016
The article examines academic self-concept with two academically high-performing Black male high school students through the conceptual and methodological tool of identity mapping.

by Chezare Warren, Ty-Ron Douglas & Tyrone Howard — 2016
This article outlines the imperative for strengths-based research to counter deficit perceptions and perspectives of Black males in contemporary discussions of their school achievement in the United States. The importance of young men of color in shaping research agendas, practice, and public policy is argued followed by a brief overview of the papers featured in the special issue “Erasing the Deficits: ‘My Brother’s Keeper’ and Contemporary Perspectives on Black Male School Achievement.”

by Bryan Hotchkins — 2016
This article examines the ways in which African American male students navigate racial microaggressions while attending a culturally diverse high school.

by Kenneth Anderson — 2016
This study examines the relationships between teacher sorting practices, course enrollment patterns, extracurricular activities, and student outcomes for high-achieving Black males in high school.

by Shaun Harper & Christopher Newman — 2016
This article is about Black undergraduate men’s academic adjustment experiences in the first college year. It is based on a study of 219 achievers at 42 colleges and universities across 20 states in the United States.

by Ty-Ron Douglas & Noelle Witherspoon Arnold — 2016
Drawing on a larger oral history project, this paper reports the findings of a secondary narrative analysis of a Black Bermudian male to provide an in-depth understanding of his in-school and out-of-school educational experiences, identity construction and success.

by Tyrone Howard, Ty-Ron Douglas & Chezare Warren — 2016
This brief presents the most significant recommendations based on a review of key findings from research presented in this special issue. The authors offer what they believe to be the most important considerations of what works for improving Black male school achievement in the domains of research, practice, and policy.

by Ivory Toldson & David Johns — 2016
This is the epilogue to the special issue. The authors, two White House officials and policy experts, describe how negative narratives surrounding Black men and the misuse of data can manifest as barriers to high quality learning environments or workforce development opportunities.

by Wendy Cavendish, Beth Harry, Ana Maria Menda, Anabel Espinosa & Margarette Mahotiere — 2016
The purpose of this study is to examine the Response to Intervention (RTI) implementation process in two culturally diverse, urban schools. The authors describe the process of large scale RTI implementation through the lens of Systems Change Theory.

by Jody Piro & Gina Anderson — 2016
In this article, a typology for an online Socrates Café discussion forum emerges from the theoretical framework of pedagogical and dispositional components guiding the pedagogy. The typology may assist instructors to create and sustain purposeful online discussion forums that engage students in deliberative discussion.

by Jessica Thompson, Sara Hagenah, Hosun Kang, David Stroupe, Melissa Braaten, Carolyn Colley & Mark Windschitl — 2016
Maintaining rigorous and equitable classroom discourse is a worthy goal, yet there is no clear consensus of how this actually works in a classroom. This mixed-method study examines differences in discourse within and across classroom episodes (warm-ups, small group conversations, whole group conversation, etc.) that elevate, or fail to elevate, students’ explanatory rigor in equitable ways.

by Laura Desimone, Eric Hochberg & Jennifer McMaken — 2016
Do teacher knowledge and instructional quality grow in the first two years of teaching? Are they related to each other? The authors examine these questions with a sample of 45 middle school math teachers in their first two years of teaching, from 11 districts in four states.

by Linda Caswell, Alina Martinez, Okhee Lee, Barbara Brauner Berns & Hilary Rhodes — 2016
This study examined whether the National Science Foundation’s Discovery Research in K–12 program has made a unique contribution to the research in the fields of science and mathematics education for English language learners (ELLs). We compared research from ELL science and mathematics projects that were funded by the program with research in these fields in terms of research topics, design, methods, outcomes, and researcher expertise.

by Francesca López — 2016
This study examines the relationship between teacher-reported culturally responsive beliefs and behaviors and grade 3–5 Latino students’ reading outcomes.

by Wayne Journell — 2016
This article analyzes the act of teacher political disclosure using both the democratic and interpersonal aspects of Foucault’s notion of parrhēsia.

by Xueli Wang — 2016
Guided by Weidman’s Undergraduate Socialization Theory, this study explores factors influencing the educational expectations and progress of students at a public 2-year college in a Midwestern state.

by Rosa Valls & Laura Ruiz — 2016
Introduction to the Special Issue

by Carme Garcia-Yeste, Gisela Redondo-Sama, Maria Padrós & Patricia Melgar — 2016
At the turn of the 20th Century, a surprising series of events occurred in Spain, including the loss of its overseas colonies, which sent the country into a state of confusion and provoked strong political tensions within. Simultaneously its cultural scene developed a fascinating degree of momentum. Spain became the cradle of some of the world’s foremost painters, poets, writers, and intellectuals, including the Catalan pedagogue Ferrer i Guàrdia (1859-1909), who became a world figure with his educational project, the Modern School.

by Elisenda Giner, Laura Ruiz, Mª Ángeles Serrano & Rosa Valls — 2016
For the more than 20,000 working-class women who participated in the Free Women movement in Spain, women’s sexuality was a key topic in both their process of empowerment and their claims and activities. The objective of this paper is to explore the ways in which this movement helped improve the personal lives of women in that period, and to analyze how it contributed to sexual education and encouraged other women to have sexual and affective relationships free of violence.

by Adrianna Aubert, Bea Villarejo, Joan Cabré & Tatiana Santos — 2016
The article analyzes the democratic organization of the Adult School of La Verneda-Sant Martí in Barcelona, Spain. The school is relevant at the international level because of its trajectory and its contributions to the transformative movement in democratic education.

by Esther Oliver, Itxaso Tellado, Montserrat Yuste & Rosa Larena-Fernández — 2016
This article studies the origins of democratic adult education in Spain by examining historical educational experiences such as the libertarian movement and the influences of social and educational theories, including Paulo Freire’s work.

by Terrance Green & Mark Gooden — 2016
Introduction to the special issue on Milliken v. Bradley.

by Terrance Green & Mark Gooden — 2016
The purpose of this study is to examine the context and contradictions in Milliken. In doing so, we review select federal school desegregation cases that informed the judicial and plaintiff’s thinking in Milliken, and provide an in-depth description of the city of Detroit and Detroit Public Schools, prior to and during Milliken. We also analyze how the Milliken decision reinforced what we refer to as the “contours of privilege” as well as materialized property rights for white, suburban students and school districts at the expense of African American students in Detroit Public Schools.

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